Water stones can also be made out of natural or synthetic materials and they are fast becoming the most popular type of whetstone as they only require the use of water to lubricate the stone. They are not as messy to work with as an oil stone and deliver fast sharpening results but for even better results, soak the stone in water for 5 or 10 minutes.

Before we start, I want to make clear that there are dozens of different ways to sharpen a knife. Everyone has a way they think is best, and men have all sorts  of techniques and tools that they feel are essential in getting a sharp blade. In the end, much of it comes down to personal preference. I’m going to show you the way I learned how to sharpen a pocket knife. It’s very basic, good for beginners, and best of all, it works. If you have an alternative method that you prefer, great. Share it with us in the comments. I’d love to hear your tips.

When the stone is intended for use on a flat surface, it is called a Bench Stone. On the other hand, small, portable, hand-held stones are referred to as Pocket Stones. Also, because Pocket Stones are smaller than Bench Stones, they are more easily transported but, they also present difficulty in maintaining a consistent angle and even pressure when attempting to sharpen longer blades. Consequently, Bench Stones are commonly used at home or in camp whereas, Pocket Stones are generally reserved for honing an edge in the field.

I am just starting out sharpening with whet stones. I have found these stones to be very nice and the instructional videos that come along with the set on knifeplanet are extremely helpful to anyone starting out. The cost of the set was very reasonable and seems to be a great value. The customer service is amazing, I lost the site for the videos and sent an email to get the information and immediately there was a reply with all of the links that I needed. I appreciate their attention to their customers!!
1. Diamond Stones. I’ve used two, many years ago, to sharpen steel knives & found that the diamond coating wore away. They did work well at first, but then I was sharpening on the backing material. This puzzled me, because diamond is harder than steel, but have only recently read that the diamond particles are torn off the backing material because they stick to the softer steel. Diamond stones are recommended for sharpening ceramic knives only. This info about diamond stones & steel knives I got from an Edge-Pro article.
Whetstone sharpener or sharpening stone has been here and there for a long time even before we born in the form of natural stone whatever they look like. Until today, the natural stone likely to be the most preferred options to sharpening things because of their versatility. As the technology improves, there are immerging new models and we are now not only having an option to the natural stone, but there are also other types considered better and more practical to use. The arrays can be bewildering to the inexperienced sharpeners that so often times many of them end up with a crap or wrong decision on stone type for their utensils.
All stones require either water or oil as a lubricant to sharpen the knife. We prefer water stones because they’re easier to use, less messy and don’t have the possibility to go rancid like oil does. If you choose a water stone, all you have to do is either add water to the stone before placing the knife on the surface, or soak the stone in water for 10 minutes before use. You’ll want to read the instruction for the stone you purchase to find out how to use it properly.
A common myth is that sharpening steels actually sharpen knives, and can replace stones or other sharpening devices. Steels actually hone a knife and help keep its edge if used regularly. A steel should be used before and after each knife use for proper maintenance. Easily enough, it's used the same way you use a sharpening stone. To find the proper angle, hold the knife horizontally with the edge touching the steel. Move the spine upward to create a 45-degree angle, and then half that again for your optimal sharpening angle.
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We’ve shown you how to keep knives sharp before, and even discussed why water stones are best, but this crash course is quick, fast, and gets to the point. In most cases the most the average person at home can do is either hone their blade with a honing steel, which straightens and lines up the blade’s edge, but it doesn’t sharpen it. Alternatively you could run it through a handheld or electronic sharpener, but depending on the model you use it can do more harm than good.
These are very popular stones. 8" Dia-Sharps have a single grit per stone making them more expensive, but at 8" by 3" they are wider than the 8" DuoSharps, offering a good working surface. The 8" Dia-Sharp line also has the widest range of grits available from DMT, with extra extra coarse, medium extra fine and extra extra fine options not available in other sizes, so it is good line to consider. One coarse and one fine stone is a good starting point.
Start off on the rough grit side of the stone. Check the grit on your stone, or the packaging that came with the stone, to identify which is which. In general, whetstones and diamond stones each have different grits on either side. The rough grit side is used to grind the steel down, while the fine grit side is used to sharpen or hone the knife. The grinding process comes first, so you start on the rough grit side.
My first set of sharpening stones so I have nothing to compare them to. For $50, though, great price to get into the world of sharpening. Stones are great and easy to use. Was able to put hair shaving edges on knives. Took a couple of knives to feel comfortable and better with the process and how to sharpen, but the stones you get work great. Here's the secret though. Get the green leather stoping block as well. As great as the stone are, I have found that stroping the knife after the fact is what really brings out that razor edge. And after using the knife, stroping it again, will restore and keep it razor sharp. Hope you enjoy it as much as I am.
I've been using this stone for months and have started to find that, while the fine side does provide a nice sharp edge, the 400gr side is wearing my knives unevenly, which causes me to be unable to finely sharpen the entire length of the blade when moving to the fine side. The logo that is put in the middle of the 400gr side of the knife is causing more material to be removed than the rest of the blade when I'm sweeping across. I even verified this by going straight down the length of the fine side and watching the wear pattern come from the material coming off of the knife onto the stone.

This is an important but often confusing aspect of the sharpening process. When you sharpen knives, especially on coarser stones, you'll notice a burr form on the opposite side of the edge. It can be difficult to see, but easy to feel. Carefully feel for the burr by running your finger from the spine of the knife to the edge. The burr will jump from side to side as you sharpen each edge, and once you've felt the burr move to both sides, you can move to the next finer stone. Once you get to the finest grit, the burr will become smaller and smaller!
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Diamond whetstones, like the DMT Diamond Whetstone, are made out of industrial type diamonds which create a long-lasting hard, coarse and flat surface. A diamond whetstone is an excellent choice for when you are outdoors as you can use it dry or with a lubricant. It can take some time getting used to and the larger sized stone may not be ideal for working with small knives or cutting tools.
4. Start sharpening the first side of the blade. With your blade set at the prefect angle, you’re ready to start sharpening. Imagine you’re carving off a slim piece of the stone’s surface. Personally, I bring the blade into the stone. Other people stroke the blade away from the stone. Both ways work, so just use whatever technique you prefer. If the knife blade is curved or if it’s longer than the stone, you’ll need to sweep the blade sideways as you work, so the entire edge is sharpened evenly. Apply moderate pressure as you sharpen. No need to bear down hard on the blade. After you make one stroke, start back at the beginning and repeat. Do this about 6-12 times.
Some of the videos I watched suggested soaking the stone for 12-15 minutes prior to use. One suggested using vegetable oil on the surface versus water/soaking (I used water and presoaking it for 15-minutes). So instead of a simple 'out-of-the-box-and-use' approach, it required a bit of research before sharpening a knife. Otherwise I would have given this product a 5-star rating.
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