It is sometimes too confusing on understanding the right sharpener that right to our tools. Then using the chart above you can consider on what is the right stone. Green, red, yellow and blue line they consist of the most familiar and affordable models of sharpening stone to purchase. You can see the performance of each stone in the chart. Silicon Carbide, Aluminum Oxide, and Arkansas they are typically used with the oil (Oil Stones). Waterstones (Synthetic Waterstones) are generally made of Aluminum Oxide too, then people also use oil in place of water with their Waterstone or use water on their Silicon Carbide sharpening stone in place of oil. In this group, Waterstones is the most preferred because of its easy for sharpening edges in shorter time.
Diamond sharpening stone delivers fast cutting and sharp edges. They are tougher in material and doesn’t flatten. Therefore, it is the best way on investment if you want such of the sharpener that easy to maintain and practical to use. Diamond sharpening stone doesn’t require water other than a spill. It is also applicable to use with lubrication if you wish to.

Works well. Just got it today, sharpened two pocket knives, one a 8Cr13MoV Chinese steel, the other s30v American steel The stone made short work of both steels (which were pretty sharp already). But notably was able to make the s30v hair shaving sharp easily, something I've had trouble with. Inexpensive and useful, I love this stone. It's not the Ninja sharp 8000+ grits that you can find, but for pocket knives and EDC, it's perfect and inexpensive. Get One!!!!!!!!!!!!
You’ll know you’re reached a stopping point when you can feel the slight catch of the bevel on the edge of the blade, by carefully running your finger in the direction of the blade, or by cutting through a sheet of paper. When the knife cuts cleanly through the paper, it’s time to hone the blade. Read our guide for more information about honing vs sharpening.
Silicone Carbide whetstones on the other hand, are the fastest cutting of the three types of oil stones and the stones made by Norton are called Crystolon Stones. Also they too are graded as either fine, medium, or coarse stones depending on their grit. But, although these stones will not produce an edge as fine as Arkansas Oil Stones or India Oil Stones, their fast cutting ability makes them ideal for sharpening tools as well as for cutting the initial edge bevel on extremely dull knives or repairing the edge on damaged blades. Last, because they sharpen so quickly, it a common practice to start with a coarse Crystolon Oil Stone and then progress to either a medium or fine India Oil Stone and then to finish with an Arkansas Oil Stone.
Now you may wonder, if a finer stone produces a better cutting edge why do I need a coarse stone at all? The answer is that finer stones work much more slowly than coarse ones. The amount of metal a fine stone removes with each pass is much less than what a coarse stone removes. If you have an edge with a good shape to it from a coarse stone, this is not a problem because the fine stone doesn’t have to remove much metal to improve the edge. If the edge is dull, it will take many times longer to reshape it with a fine stone than it would with a coarse one.
TO USE: Soak stone in water for no more than 5-10 minutes. Place stone on a damp cloth with the courser 400 grit side (dark green) facing up. Hold the knife so that it’s flat and perpendicular to the block, with the blade facing left. Holding the knife at a 20-degree angle, slowly sweep the edge of the blade from left to right down the length of the stone and continue until sharp. If stone starts to feel too dry, add more water. Be patient and take your time. Flip knife over and repeat on the other side (now moving from right to left). Be sure to sharpen both sides evenly. To polish the blade further, flip stone over to the fine 1000 grit side (light green) and repeat the process. When blade is honed to desired sharpness, wash and dry your knife. To clean your stone, simply rinse with water, wipe away any remaining metal residue with a rag, rinse again, then dry.

I like the fact that there are two different grits (can be seen as two colors). the black rubber feet stick to the kitchen granite top like glue. The 1000 does a pretty good job of getting a knife roughly there and the 4000 puts on a fine polish for razor a sharp edge. I would go the extra step of stropping the knife after the grinding operation for an extra sharp edge.
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A: When it comes to the best knife sharpeners used in a domestic setting the abrasives used to sharpen the blade should last for quite a few years. When they do eventually wear out many of the best manufacturers will refurbish them for you, typically for a nominal fee. Again, however, unless you are using the sharpener on a daily basis (and there is virtually no reason the average person would do this), the sharpener should last for many years before ever needing service.
A: Most chefs have their own personal favorite and that’s what it comes down to for just about everybody; personal choice. If you’re the kind who likes to get personally involved in the process you might want to opt for a stone or stick knife sharpener.  These will allow you a certain amount of satisfaction knowing it was your expertise that produced the razor sharp edge. Others, however, are quite content to let the machine do the work and that’s fine too.
The 8,000 grit Kitayama is definitely a popular 8K stone, it is my favourite, and the feedback has much to do with that. It is silky smooth and feels creamy when you use it. When reaching refinement levels of 6k and above, polished bevels/edge are inevitable, and often sought after. The level of polish from this particular stone is very beautiful, assuming that you have done some refinement prior to this but it is a wonderful 8,000 grit stone.
You've acquired a good chef's knife, you're using it almost daily to make tasty dinners for the family, and it's stored in a nice knife rack or a magnet for safekeeping. So why stop there? Keeping that knife's edge fine will make cooking not only safer but, let's face it, much more fun. Whether you've spent £150 on a high-end knife or under a tenner on a dinky paring knife, keeping it sharp is crucial. 
The Sunrise Pro doesn’t have the pedigree of some other knife sharpeners on our list but it performs as advertised and that’s all that matters. For a relative song you get to restore all the knives, steak knives, cleavers in your kitchen to near pristine condition. It’s easy to use and the nice strong suction cup on the bottom means you can put the band aids away.
When the stone is intended for use on a flat surface, it is called a Bench Stone. On the other hand, small, portable, hand-held stones are referred to as Pocket Stones. Also, because Pocket Stones are smaller than Bench Stones, they are more easily transported but, they also present difficulty in maintaining a consistent angle and even pressure when attempting to sharpen longer blades. Consequently, Bench Stones are commonly used at home or in camp whereas, Pocket Stones are generally reserved for honing an edge in the field.

I've used ceramic rods, diamond plates, and leather strops for our sharpening needs. And, like most, I've tried a dozen little gimmicky sharpeners that, while some work, those that do often remove way too much material from the edge, making your blade wear down faster. I've also used oil stones, grinders and buffers for less meticulous sharpening of axes and such. These two stones from Unimi (600/1000 and 2000/6000) served as my introduction to whetstone sharpening. And I must say I like it. Though, I'm not sure of the need for investing in more expensive stones.
Modern synthetic stones are generally of equal quality to natural stones, and are often considered superior in sharpening performance due to consistency of particle size and control over the properties of the stones. For example, the proportional content of abrasive particles as opposed to base or "binder" materials can be controlled to make the stone cut faster or slower, as desired.[7] Natural stones are often prized for their natural beauty as stones and their rarity, adding value as collectors' items. Furthermore, each natural stone is different, and there are rare natural stones that contain abrasive particles in grit sizes finer than are currently available in artificial stones.[citation needed]

The toughest angle to master is the angle at which you'll sharpen the edge of the knife. For a Japanese knife, that should be around 12-15 degrees. Before you reach for the protractor, a good test is to get roughly half an index finger's gap between the spine of the knife and the stone (see above). Remember to remove your finger before you start sharpening. For a Western-style knife, you want an angle of about 20°, so raise it ever-so-slightly higher.
A: That depends almost entirely on how often you use them. If you are a professional chef who uses his or her knives every day then you should hone them every time you use your knives. But honing has its limits and over time your edge is going to become dull no matter what. Therefore your knives will need to be sharpened at least several times a year. Some chefs, in fact, will use a whetstone on an almost daily basis in order to ensure their knives are always razor sharp. Most of us, however, are not professional chefs and may not even touch our kitchen knives for days at a time. In that case, it’s probably a good idea to hone the edge after every couple of uses and have your knives sharpened once a year.

One thing about this stone is that it is very "thirsty." I had a cup of water close by just to add a little water periodically when it felt like it was scraping a little too aggressively. Also, be sure to do as the instructions say and use different parts of the sharpening surface. I wasn't paying attention the first few minutes, and apparently I would end each sharpening pass in the exact same spot, creating a very very small notch on the edge of the stone. So I turned the stone around and made sure to vary the ending spot, and it seemed to buff out that little notch very quickly. My knife is now incredibly sharp--it seems to glide through material rather than "cut" it. I know some people would continue to go even higher with the grit, but for my purposes this whetstone is just perfect. I'll be tackling the kitchen knives next!
2. Although I’ve been sharpening knives for a while, I never could get a knife sharp using the freehand method, I’ve had to rely on various jigs to set & maintain a constant angle to the bevel. To begin with, the Lanksy knife sharpener kit was my main tool, but then I found a South African jig made by Warthog Knife Sharpeners. I still have their first model, which, if memory serves me, came out in the late 1990’s. This has since been upgraded & is supplied with a diamond stone, which is worthless unless it’s going to be used for ceramic knives. However-the Warthog & the Warthog Multi-Blade’s modus operandi has the knife moving ABOVE the stone, unlike the Lanksy / Edge Pro / Edge Pro Chinese copies & variants. ( No oil / water dripping off the stone from above the knife). Also, the Warthogs use any bench-size whetstone available to its owner, a very big plus if you want to use your grand-dad’s old Arkansas stone.No tie in having to buy the manufacturer’s specialised stones which work only with one type of sharpening jig.
To take off the fine scratches and burrs left by coarser stones, and to polish the surface, you can use stones starting at around 2000 grit. There is theoretically no upper limit, but stones above about 10000 grit achieve practically no measurable improvement in the edge. It is also interesting to note that above 8000 grit, there is no Japanese measurement standard. For stones labelled as having a finer grit, you simply have to take the manufacturer's word for it.
Some of the videos I watched suggested soaking the stone for 12-15 minutes prior to use. One suggested using vegetable oil on the surface versus water/soaking (I used water and presoaking it for 15-minutes). So instead of a simple 'out-of-the-box-and-use' approach, it required a bit of research before sharpening a knife. Otherwise I would have given this product a 5-star rating.
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