Now that you're holding the handle and the blade is in position, gently apply some pressure to the belly of the blade with your left hand fingers – "roughly the amount of pressure to semi depress a sponge," says Warner. Starting at the tip, glide the blade up and down the stone – around five strokes up and down is a good number. Then move to the middle – five more strokes. Finally five strokes up and down on the heel.
Beginning on the right side of the knife, move from tip to heel and heel to tip, then flip the knife and repeat. For the left side, it’s opposite—start at the top of the stone to reach the heel area completely. So, you will move from heel to tip and then tip to heel. Remember to apply and release pressure as you did earlier, exactly the same as in Step 2, but with light, refining pressure.
Diamond sharpening stones are becoming really popular because of their ability to cut fast. We tend not to recommend diamond sharpening stones/plates because a lot of damage can be done very quickly. Also diamonds are pretty sharp and at arato level they leave deep scratches in the blade that need to be polished out quite aggressively. Diamond stones can be used with and without lubricant.
Japanese water stones – both natural and synthetic – are known for their superior sharpening performance, not only for Japanese tools, but also on their Western equivalents. The loosely bonded abrasive grit is washed out very quickly, as it blunts during the sharpening process; this exposes new, sharp, particles that can get to work on the blade. Water stones are lubricated only with water! Never use oil!
Nail the technique: Begin by positioning the knife with the edge facing up. Place your thumb on the spine and your index finger on the heel. Hold the knife so that the blade forms a straight line with the rest of your arm. Position the knife so that the bevel of the edge is flat against the whetstone. Note that this angle will be different for every knife; it’s a matter of feeling it out.

When using a sharpening stone, there are three keys to success. First, ensure that you are leaving a controlled edge angle on the knife blade by using an angle guide. Second, make sure that you establish an entirely new edge by sharpening until you raise a burr on the steel. Third, make sure that the new edge is smooth by honing or polishing the blade.

This is an important but often confusing aspect of the sharpening process. When you sharpen knives, especially on coarser stones, you'll notice a burr form on the opposite side of the edge. It can be difficult to see, but easy to feel. Carefully feel for the burr by running your finger from the spine of the knife to the edge. The burr will jump from side to side as you sharpen each edge, and once you've felt the burr move to both sides, you can move to the next finer stone. Once you get to the finest grit, the burr will become smaller and smaller!
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Learning sharpening technique requires focus even without worrying about the stone itself. Stones that require frequent flattening, soaking and cleaning, or that take a long time to create an edge can be a source of frustration to some beginning sharpeners. Keep in mind your willingness perform regular maintenance when choosing a starting set of stones.
Once the burr is removed, it's time to test the sharpness with paper. Hold a piece of newspaper at about 45°, with a bit of tension, and slash lightly with each point of the blade. If it cuts through easily, your knife's sharp. Warner speedily lacerated his newspaper, but I of course struggled. There is an element of technique involved, he reassured me. 
When sharpening a knife using a sharpening stone, keep sharpening until enough steel has been removed to form a burr on the edge of the blade. This burr will be removed during the honing and polishing process, but it is the easiest way to ensure that you have removed enough metal, exposing a completely new knife edge. Once the knife is polished, it will be ready for use again.
Before starting the sharpening process, you should put some honing solution to the surface. Water can also be used as a substitute but you don’t need to use a lot of them as a small amount would be enough for it. The absent of lubricant and water will cause a damage to your stone. The angle guide will help you to keep the blade at a perfect angle so that you can get the best output.
A sharpening stone is made of particles of abrasive material that are sintered or bonded together. The blade is moved across the stone and the steel is worn away, which creates the edge. However, at the same time, the stone is also worn away to reveal new, coarse particles. As a general rule, the softer the stone, the more rapidly it will wear and will be more aggressive in use. Harder stones don’t wear as quickly.

With a two-sided design for both coarse and fine gritting, this sharpening stone offers adequate sharpening of your kitchen knife guaranteeing ultimate performance and impressive results. The coarse side features 400 grit while the fine side boasts 800 grit for better finishing and smoothing of the edges. Made from Silicon Carbide, this is a top-grade sharpening knife boasting ultimate durability.


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Selecting the right sharpening angle is the next step in sharpening. For more detailed instructions on selecting the right angle, try reading this article. Regardless of the method of sharpening, a appropriate angle should be selected. This angle doesn't need to be exact but following some general guidelines is a good idea. Most knife manufacturers recommend a roughly 20 degree angle. Depending on the use of your knife, you can move up or down from that angle. A fillet or slicing knife is never used on anything hard so an angle a few degrees less will produce a sharper edge. On the other hand, a survival knife with various uses can benefit from a more durable edge a few degrees larger.
This pocket-size Lansky dual grit has a coarse 120 grit side and a medium 280 grit side. The unique tool is ideal for sharpening a wide variety of blades. The Puck’s contoured shape is very much grip-able and provides enough safety while you do your tool sharpening. Its coarse side provides quick cutting and shaping, and the medium side will help to get the final finishing of the edge.
A single stone of 120 grit and a combination stone of 1000 and 3000 grits come along with a stone holder all for a price of less than many other individual stones. The stones are 6 7/8" long and 2 1/8" wide. A flattening stone of some kind would be needed, but with economical options available in those, the overall price of this kit would still be low. This entry level set is a good budget minded option.
This pocket-size Lansky dual grit has a coarse 120 grit side and a medium 280 grit side. The unique tool is ideal for sharpening a wide variety of blades. The Puck’s contoured shape is very much grip-able and provides enough safety while you do your tool sharpening. Its coarse side provides quick cutting and shaping, and the medium side will help to get the final finishing of the edge.
Their lifespan has no competition, they last so long and do not reduce their effectiveness during that time. The only secret with ceramic stones is that you should take maintenance seriously else they will wear before they are due. The other beauty of these stones is that they need no lubrication you can use them dry. They will give you a very sharp and fine blade after which you need to scrub them to remove the metal particles. Ceramic stones are very hard which means that they can remain flat for decades. The downside to ceramic stones is that they only provide you with fine grit and if it falls, it breaks easily into pieces.

Their lifespan has no competition, they last so long and do not reduce their effectiveness during that time. The only secret with ceramic stones is that you should take maintenance seriously else they will wear before they are due. The other beauty of these stones is that they need no lubrication you can use them dry. They will give you a very sharp and fine blade after which you need to scrub them to remove the metal particles. Ceramic stones are very hard which means that they can remain flat for decades. The downside to ceramic stones is that they only provide you with fine grit and if it falls, it breaks easily into pieces.
Cutlery is essential to the operation of every commercial kitchen, so it is important to know the best techniques for kitchen knife handling and safety. Proper knife training can help minimize the risk of personal injury and keep your kitchen running smoothly. If you are just beginning to learn or simply need to brush up on your approach, keep reading for some helpful knife safety tips. 1. A Sharp Knife Is a Safer Knife When you use a dull knife to cut, you need to apply more force. As a result, the knife is more likely to slip and increases the risk of injury. Keeping your knives sharpened is one of the easiest ways to keep them safe. Simply use a sharpening stone or knife sharpener to maintain the original precision of the blade. If your

Like most of the top level sharpening stones, it also uses water for sharpening and you don’t need to use expensive sharpening or honing oils. As a result, while sharpening, there are no messy substances on the body and you can clean it with great ease. Before using the stone make sure to soak it in water for at least 15 minutes to get the best output.
This is an important but often confusing aspect of the sharpening process. When you sharpen knives, especially on coarser stones, you'll notice a burr form on the opposite side of the edge. It can be difficult to see, but easy to feel. Carefully feel for the burr by running your finger from the spine of the knife to the edge. The burr will jump from side to side as you sharpen each edge, and once you've felt the burr move to both sides, you can move to the next finer stone. Once you get to the finest grit, the burr will become smaller and smaller!
We get asked regularly to recommend stones for the beginning sharpener. Everyone wants to get stones that will be of the most practical use. No one wants to waste money on something they will have to replace later. The goal is to get stones that can be used as a foundation for your future needs. But the number of options available can be bewildering to the inexperienced sharpener, leaving many wondering where to start.

To take off the fine scratches and burrs left by coarser stones, and to polish the surface, you can use stones starting at around 2000 grit. There is theoretically no upper limit, but stones above about 10000 grit achieve practically no measurable improvement in the edge. It is also interesting to note that above 8000 grit, there is no Japanese measurement standard. For stones labelled as having a finer grit, you simply have to take the manufacturer's word for it.
This stone and accessories (rubber frame for holding stone, flat grinding block) are pretty good quality. The 3000 side will remove very small nicks in kitchen knife blades, if you are patient, and the 8000 side will polish the edge for some considerable sharpness. I have another larger stone that is 1000 grit to remove more significant nicks and reshape the edge to get it ready for the 3000 stone. The quality of the 3000 stone is not quite there; as it contains some small, harder inclusions. These inclusions are white in the green matrix of the stone and could be fragments of the 8000 grit side. My larger 1000 grit stone is of the King brand, and it is higher quality and more homogeneous than this 3000 stone. Also, this stone is a bit smaller than one would ideally want for sharpening knives of 7 in or longer blade length. I would mostly recommend this stone for paring knives.
As a professional culinarian who uses expensive knives and tools- even in my everyday life, this sharpening stone has become a “must have” in my arsenal. Whether I am restoring an older, well-worn blade back to its glory or simply keeping up with the everyday wear on my go-to knife, the 3000/8000 grit sharpening stone gives my knives the edge in the kitchen (all puns intended;)).

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Their lifespan has no competition, they last so long and do not reduce their effectiveness during that time. The only secret with ceramic stones is that you should take maintenance seriously else they will wear before they are due. The other beauty of these stones is that they need no lubrication you can use them dry. They will give you a very sharp and fine blade after which you need to scrub them to remove the metal particles. Ceramic stones are very hard which means that they can remain flat for decades. The downside to ceramic stones is that they only provide you with fine grit and if it falls, it breaks easily into pieces. 
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