The most important aspect of a sharpening stone is the grit. If you have knives that have taken a beating and are either nicked up or really dull, you’ll need a courser stone to get it back into shape. And in order to put an exceptionally sharp edge on an already sharp knife, you’ll need a finer grit stone. If your knives are already in pretty good shape and just need a touch up, buying just a finer grit stone might be enough, but don’t think you can get away without a courser stone for knives that need more TLC. It is possible to buy a combination, or two-sided sharpening stone.

The Norton Wtaerstone 4000/8000 Grit is one of the world’s most popular knife sharpening stones. It is 2-side stone that performs both sharpening and polishing. It is a synthetic water stone designed to be softer than oil stones. Its 4000 grit in one face is used for maintaining and refining a cutting edge while its 8000 grit on the other face is used for polishing cutting edges. The norton wtaerstone is one of the best japanese sharpening stone.


Rest your knife on the stone at your chosen angle. An easy method for determining the angle by eye is to visualize a 45 degree angle and then take half that amount. That will give you a ballpark estimate of the angle and then you can adjust accordingly up or down. With a slicing action bring the length of the knife across the stone with a motion that starts with the heel of the knife on the stone and ends with the point of the knife. The motion should resemble a sweeping arc pattern across your stone. Be very careful to maintain the angle of the knife on the stone. Longer curved knives provide additional challenges but as long as you can maintain the angle you will be sharpening very effectively. Repeat this process on the other side of the knife and continue repeating until you have sharpened your knife though all your stone grits.
first time buying a sharping stone. i bought this because i wanted to sharpen kitchen knives. you have to practice to get good at it, use a knife you don't care about because you might mess it up. there is some conflicting instructions online on how to use, water or no water. read as much as you can about using stones and practice, practice , practice. look up videos on youtube and internet. i had fun using it, BUY IF YOU WANT TO LEARN here is some stuff i found, they all sound like professionals http://video.about.com/culinaryarts/Sharpen-Knives-With-a-Whetston.htm?rd=1 http://culinaryarts.about.com/od/knivescutlery/ht/whetstone.htm this is a video that says don't use water http://video.about.com/culinaryarts/Sharpen-Knives-With-a-Whetston.htm?rd=1 this is a youtube video that i watched that uses water. *informative http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFIg9Cm-nJg

In recent years, some whetstone manufacturers have started producing ceramic whetstones made from hard, ceramic, powders that are mixed with Aluminum Oxide and then sintered to form a solid. But, rather than using oil or water to lubricate the whetstone, ceramic whetstones are meant to be used without lubrication and thus, they provide a significant advantage for chefs who need to keep their knives sharp but, who do not have either the room or time for using a bench water stone. Thus, they are commonly available as either bench stones, pocket stones, round rods, or triangular rods.


Chefs and hand-workers who use blades and even hunters understand that a sharp blade makes work so much easier and you use less force. To keep edges sharp, the right sharpening equipment needs to be available, and that’s what sharpening stones do. The guide explores some of the best sharpening stones that have undergone testing. They are the best available sharpening stones and give the best results.
A shinkansen is a Japanese-style pull-through sharpener named after the famous bullet train. It features two sets of ceramic wheels set at the right angle for sharpening a Japanese blade, which takes out the guesswork of the waterstone. Simply hold the handle with your left hand, then saw back and forth gently through the coarser wheel to sharpen, before switching to the finer wheel to polish.
For this section, we are going to break down the most common types of stones that you will find. In general, you will either see oil, water, or diamond stones. Starting with the latter, these generally are the most expensive and may not be ideal for the average consumer. As for the other two, oil and water, they are two very popular types in the world today. Starting with oil, these are the models that most consumers will be accustomed to. They are typically either made of aluminum oxide, silicon carbide or novaculite. Oil stones remain popular due to their strong overall performance and generally lower cost. Yet, the downside to oil is that they sharpen at a very slow rate. In fact, they are the slowest amongst the main types.
First step: Before starting to sharpen your knife, we recommend you to soak your whetstone in water for about 5 minutes. The dampness of the grit allows you to slide the blade smootly without having to apply extra pressure. This step does not apply for natural sharpening stones or Arkansas stones, because these ones require you to apply honing oil to their surface to allow a smooth sharpening movement.
Now it's time to polish. This is when you'll swap over from the coarse grit to the finer grit (make sure this side is wet, too). I found the knife still had a bit of grime on it, so I gave it a wipe clean beforehand. The motion is exactly the same as with sharpening, but you can apply slightly less pressure, and limit to roughly 30 strokes on each side. 

With its premium series Select II, the whetstone manufacturer Sigma Power Corporation from Tokyo addresses users of high-alloy steels such as HSS. These stones, too, are obviously intended to engender a grinding experience similar to that of natural stones. The special production process is expensive, but the Sigma Select II probably has no equal when it comes to demolishing steel. 
×