This pocket-size Lansky dual grit has a coarse 120 grit side and a medium 280 grit side. The unique tool is ideal for sharpening a wide variety of blades. The Puck’s contoured shape is very much grip-able and provides enough safety while you do your tool sharpening. Its coarse side provides quick cutting and shaping, and the medium side will help to get the final finishing of the edge.
My order came in incomplete. I contacted the company and had a response within a couple hours. They immediately responded, researched and started the replacement process. I had my order replacement within 1 week or so. Every email was answered the same day. I so highly recommend this company. LOVE MY PRODUCT AND LOVE THE SERVICE MORE. GREAT COMPANY.
Actually, the company contacted me to make sure I received the stones and that I was happy with them. Excellent service. The stones are great! I'm pretty much a novice so the clear instructions that came with the stones and the eBook instructions were wonderful. The eBook had quality pictures demonstrating the use of the stones and the written instructions were clear and to the point. Within minutes of opening the box I had the stones figured out and sharpening my AF survival knife, my pocket knife and a couple of my wife's kitchen knives...which included a very expensive chef's knife. Very satisfied with this product and highly recommend it.

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As a professional culinarian who uses expensive knives and tools- even in my everyday life, this sharpening stone has become a “must have” in my arsenal. Whether I am restoring an older, well-worn blade back to its glory or simply keeping up with the everyday wear on my go-to knife, the 3000/8000 grit sharpening stone gives my knives the edge in the kitchen (all puns intended;)).
A nice sharpened blade can save your day while you have a busy schedule ahead of you. It will save your time and help you to do the job smoothly with great ease. And for that sharpened blade, you really need a superb stone as that will take care of the edge for you. In this section, we tried to present the 5 best sharpening stones before you so that you don’t need to be overwhelmed by the vast number of products out there.
Some stones need water, while other stones need oil for floating the swarf (small metal filings created when sharpening) away. Simply apply a few drops of either oil or water directly to the stone. (We recommend using an inexpensive spray bottle for applying the water.) The lubricant you need is determined by the type of stone you are using. Water stones and diamond stones require water. Oil stones such as India, Crystolon and Arkansas stones use oil for a lubricant.
These stones require oil application on them before using them. It helps with ensuring that the particles chipping from the blades do not remain on the stone. Stones that use natural oils are known as Arkansas stones. Lubrication is essential because it contributes to preserve the life of the stone and also ensure that it works efficiently. There are many different grits on oil stones that each function uniquely. Using the coarse and the medium grits removes the metal around the edges of the blade very fast. Oil stones are very lasting because they are from silicon or aluminum oxide. The sharpening surfaces remain flat for a long time due to the strength of these rocks. The only downside to oil stones is that you get oily when sharpening and that you have to buy oil.
When the block is intended for installation on a bench it is called a bench stone. Small, portable stones (commonly made of bonded abrasive) are called pocket stones. Being smaller, they are more portable than bench stones but present difficulty in maintaining a consistent angle and pressure when drawing the stone along larger blades. However, they still can form a good edge. Frequently, fine grained pocket stones are used for honing, especially "in the field". Despite being a homophone with wet in most dialects of modern English, whetstones do not need to be lubricated with oil or water, although it is very common to do so. Lubrication aids the cutting action and carries swarf away.
Japanese water stones are the most famous. These are usually made from sedimentary rock and for the most part are fairly fragile. They are intended to only use be used with water as oil will destroy them. Waterstones wear out more quickly than other types but they are very easy to flatten when required. The ever common oil stone Oil stones are much like the Japanese waterstones but are more durable. With these you can use either oil or water. Most famous type of these stones are the Arkansas oilstones harvested from the Washita mountains.
These are very popular stones. 8" Dia-Sharps have a single grit per stone making them more expensive, but at 8" by 3" they are wider than the 8" DuoSharps, offering a good working surface. The 8" Dia-Sharp line also has the widest range of grits available from DMT, with extra extra coarse, medium extra fine and extra extra fine options not available in other sizes, so it is good line to consider. One coarse and one fine stone is a good starting point.
You want sharpening stones that will be useful for the majority of your edges now, and that will remain useful as you expand both your tools and your sharpening toolkit in the future. Ending up with duplicate stones or ones that are no longer useful as you gain new knives or tools is a waste of money. The goal is to start with something that will stay with you as your needs develop.
The dual-sided whetstone is made from durable silicon carbide and has 400 grit on one side to sharpen the dullest blades and 1000 grit on the other side to create a nice smooth finish once the blade has been sharpened. The stone also forms a nice slurry that helps polish the blade for a superb shine. The stone is meant to be used with water, not oil and for best results, simply soak stone for 5-10 minutes before use, and lubricate with additional water as needed when sharpening.

Cross-contamination of food can lead to serious health risks like food poisoning or unintended exposure to food allergens . If your kitchen staff members know how to prevent cross-contamination by correctly storing and preparing food, you can save the time and money that would be wasted on improperly handled food. By making the effort to separate your foods while storing and preparing them, sanitizing your kitchen surfaces and equipment, and practicing proper personal hygiene, you can create a safe and sanitary kitchen environment that is better for your customers, your employees, and your business. What is Cross-Contamination? Cross-contamination occurs when disease-causing microorganisms, like bacteria and viruses, are transferred from on
The price of a whetstone is most often indicative of its quality, which directly correlates to how hard the stone is. “The more expensive stone, typically, is comprised of a harder material, which is efficient at grinding metal off of a good-quality knife,” Lau says. “It allows you to sharpen quicker [and] it allows you to sharpen a very high-quality knife, whereas a cheaper stone may not create a good edge if a knife is made from a very hard metal.” A well-made whetstone should cost $60 to $70.

Now that you're holding the handle and the blade is in position, gently apply some pressure to the belly of the blade with your left hand fingers – "roughly the amount of pressure to semi depress a sponge," says Warner. Starting at the tip, glide the blade up and down the stone – around five strokes up and down is a good number. Then move to the middle – five more strokes. Finally five strokes up and down on the heel.
In summary: Peter Nowlan is a professional knife sharpener based in Halifax (Canada) and he recommends the KnifePlanet Sharpening Stone Set, a beginners and intermediate kit that includes 4 sharpening grits: 400/1000, 3000/8000, a bamboo base and the KnifePlanet Flattening Stone. The Japanese Naniwa 3-stone combination is also a great (and more expensive) choice, ideal for professionals and more advanced sharpeners: the Naniwa stones are slightly bigger compared to KnifePlanet’s. In both cases, a coarse, medium and fine grit combination is very effective to sharpen and refine the edge:
First step: Before starting to sharpen your knife, we recommend you to soak your whetstone in water for about 5 minutes. The dampness of the grit allows you to slide the blade smootly without having to apply extra pressure. This step does not apply for natural sharpening stones or Arkansas stones, because these ones require you to apply honing oil to their surface to allow a smooth sharpening movement.

A few times in this guide, you have been witnessed to Arkansas stones. As you probably know by now, these are not Waterstones. Still, users have begged the question of whether or not water can be used in place of oil. For the most part, most manufacturers will advise against using water in place of oil for these types of stones. The reason for this is actually due to the issue of using water as a lubricant. You see, with oil, when you apply it for the first time, some of it is going to remain on it. So, even while in storage, it partially contains oil and then the next time you need it, you will not need as much.
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You remember back when the differences between oil and Waterstones were discussed? Well, that comes back into play a little bit right here. Another common question that consumers have about Arkansas stones is if they will ever lose their flatness. You see, with Waterstones, they are a bit softer and will become uneven after successive uses. But, due to the fact that Arkansas stones are harder, they will not flatten at the same rate. In fact, you may or may not ever need to flatten them. Yet, this does depend on how frequently you use it.
Their lifespan has no competition, they last so long and do not reduce their effectiveness during that time. The only secret with ceramic stones is that you should take maintenance seriously else they will wear before they are due. The other beauty of these stones is that they need no lubrication you can use them dry. They will give you a very sharp and fine blade after which you need to scrub them to remove the metal particles. Ceramic stones are very hard which means that they can remain flat for decades. The downside to ceramic stones is that they only provide you with fine grit and if it falls, it breaks easily into pieces.
These types of stones need to splashing of oil on the surface before you use them for sharpening. By this technique, the residue of the process is cleared away during sharpening strokes. One of the types of this oil stone is the Arkansas stone that uses natural oil. This liquidation process is essential because it ultimately contributes to the life cycle of the stone by preserving it for years to come. Also, they help to carry out the process very smoothly.

The word “Novaculite” is derived from the Latin word “novacula”, which means “razor stone” and is essentially a metamorphic, recrystallized, variety of Chert composed mostly of microcrystalline quartz that is found in the found in the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma and in the Marathon Uplift of  Deposited in the Devonian Period and the early Mississippian Subperiod some 410 to 325 million years ago and subjected to uplift and folding during the Ouachita orogeny of the Atokan Epoch (early Pennsylvanian Subperiod), Novaculite is a very tough stone that is resistant to erosion and thus, the various layers of Novaculite stand out as ridges in the Ouachita Mountains. Thus, due to both its availability and its composition, it has been mined since ancient times for use as arrowheads and spear heads as well as in more modern times for use as sharpening stones.
I first received my Kamikoto knife as a gift. I have found my new favorite knife! I am very pleased with the balanced grip, which in itself is a work of ergonomic art. I have never used a single bevel blade before and, after a bit of experimenting, find it an improvement for several tasks. Based on my experience with the Kamikoto knife, I purchased the Knife Set for my son who is a graduate chef of many years experience. He also is very pleased with his gift.

Oil stones have been around a long time, and while not as popular as in the past, they are still a practical option. Not as fast as the other stones, they are easy to use and their lower price makes them a good value for the budget conscious. With oil stones, the relation of the types and grits can be confusing. Our article, Difference in Sharpening Stone Materials, provides a more in depth explanation, but in general an India stone or two combined with an Arkansas stone is a good combination to start with.
Stellar Knife Sharpening Whetstone 400 & 1000 Grit is a stellar sharpening stone with a two piece precision sharpening 400/1000 combination grit for enhanced performance. The firm but porous structure of the stone continuously releases small particles during the sharpening process that when combined with water are responsible for sharpening the knife blade. Features a non-slip base stand that ensures the stone stays stable while in use.
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