Here at MyChefKnives, we are glad to be able to offer you a large selection of sharpening stones from some of the best brands of the market such as KAI, Kasumi, Wusthof, and more! Whether you call it sharpening stone or simply a whetstone, this is undoubtedly a very useful accessory in every kitchen, and it is a great option for unexperienced cooks that do not feel at ease using a sharpening steel. Given that not all kitchen knives are constructed in the same way, there are different types of sharpening stones that adapt to each different level of blade hardness and rigidity. However, due to the great number of options available, we can understand that choosing a sharpening stone is not an easy thing to do. Therefore, below we offer you a brief explanation that can guide you to choose the right whetstone for your knife.
The dual-sided whetstone is made from durable silicon carbide and has 400 grit on one side to sharpen the dullest blades and 1000 grit on the other side to create a nice smooth finish once the blade has been sharpened. The stone also forms a nice slurry that helps polish the blade for a superb shine. The stone is meant to be used with water, not oil and for best results, simply soak stone for 5-10 minutes before use, and lubricate with additional water as needed when sharpening.
Once sufficiently wet, it's time to position the stone on something solid, so it doesn't move about during sharpening. Many come with holders, but you can just place it on a slightly damp tea towel on the table. The stone should be roughly perpendicular to your body, though Warner told me it is sometimes easier to angle it ever so slightly to the right (if you're right handed). 
When a whetstone is used to cut metal, it acts like sandpaper by removing small particles of metal (aka “swarf”) with each pass of the blade over the stone. Therefore, whetstones with more coarse grits cut faster than those with finer grits and, at the same time, soft whetstones cut faster than hard whetstones because each pass of the blade over both types of whetstones not only removes fine particles of metal from the blade, it also removes fine particles from the surface of the whetstone (aka “slurry”) which continuously exposes new cutting crystals. However, if the swarf is allowed to build up on the surface of the whetstone during sharpening, it will clog the stone and drastically diminish its effectiveness. Therefore, some whetstones require water to lubricate the stone and suspend the swarf whereas, other whetstones require oil to lubricate the stone and suspend the swarf.
Oil stones have been around a long time, and while not as popular as in the past, they are still a practical option. Not as fast as the other stones, they are easy to use and their lower price makes them a good value for the budget conscious. With oil stones, the relation of the types and grits can be confusing. Our article, Difference in Sharpening Stone Materials, provides a more in depth explanation, but in general an India stone or two combined with an Arkansas stone is a good combination to start with.

Even sharpening stones have a technique to them, and you need to master the technique first. Most people may find that they are sharpening wrong and that’s why it’s important to understand the angles. Once you learn how to use the sharpening stone efficiently, then it becomes very easy to sharpen blades. It is also critical that exact dipping time is observed to avoid breakage.
Second step: Now is time to do the actual sharpening. If you have a combination whetstone (meaning that it has two faces with different grit), you always need to start with the coarse grit, and then, the final polishing of the blade is done with a fine grit. While smootly sliding the edge of your knife's blade across the surface of the stone, try to always maintain a stable angle between the blade and stone (in between 15 and 30 degrees). You can use a sharpening angle guide to help you maintain the right angle at all times. 
In addition, there are three broad grades of Japanese Water Stones consisting of the Ara-to (rough stone), the Naka-to (middle/medium stone) and, the Shiage-to (finishing stone). However, it should be noted that the various grades of natural Japanese Water Stones vary widely in both density and grit size from stone to stone and thus, they do not translate well to American or European abrasive standards. Furthermore, because they are significantly softer than Novaculite, Japanese Water Stones must be flattened more often and do not last as long as a either Novaculite or Coticule stones. But, because they form a slurry of fine particles when used, they also do a superior job of both cutting and polishing.
When starting out sharpening, it won’t be long before you hear about the “toothy” vs “polished” edge. It will suffice to know that a 1k stone is going to give you an edge that will perform beautifully as will a knife finished at 5k. There is a belief that a knife that has a highly polished finish, 5k and up will be so polished that it’s toothy goodness will be erased. This knife will not bite into the skin of a tomato for example because the edge is too polished, it will slide over the top. This is not always true, if the knife has been sharpened well, i.e. if Side A and Side B of the blade meet precisely at the Apex of the knife, that edge will slide into a tomato quite beautifully. I have seen many brand new Japanese knives with highly polished 8k edges that no tomato skin can stand up to.
If you are serious about cooking, or even if you are a professional chef, then chances are you have used Knife sharpening stones, in the past or maybe even very regularly. Knife sharpening stones can take the form of a sharpening stone, a steel rod, sometimes even diamond coated to make it more effective, or an electric sharpener, which can do several knives at once and give great results in a matter of seconds. However, there are also professional knife sharpening services, which a number of professional chefs favor. So how do they line up against sharpening yourself? Read on to find out.

When sharpening a knife using a sharpening stone, keep sharpening until enough steel has been removed to form a burr on the edge of the blade. This burr will be removed during the honing and polishing process, but it is the easiest way to ensure that you have removed enough metal, exposing a completely new knife edge. Once the knife is polished, it will be ready for use again.
Sharpal 178N TRANSFORMAN 3-In-1 Diamond Round and Tapered Sharpal 178N TRANSFORMAN 3-In-1 Diamond Round and Tapered Rod Sharpener makes it easy to sharpen all kinds of knives including those with serrations gut hooks fishhooks and pointed tools. Industrial monocrystalline diamond is electroplated in nickel onto a steel base. Sharpen dry. No messy oil needed. Fine 600 grit (25 ...  More + Product Details Close
The answer to the question of how to choose a single whetstone from among the many is actually one of both purpose and expense. Indeed, as the old adage says: “You get what you pay for” – This is certainly the case with sharpening stones. In fact, as a general rule, a high quality, natural, whetstone is significantly more expensive than a man-made whetstone but, they also tend to produce a noticeably finer edge than man-made stones do. On the other hand, man-made whetstones (with the exception of diamond hones) are very affordable and, just like natural whetstones, they too are available in different grits for different stages in the sharpening process from cutting the initial edge bevel to polishing a finely honed edge.
Stone is awesome, stand and rubber holder are awesome. Sharpened my Benchmade griptilian with a 154CM (58-61HRC) stainless steel blade to easily shaving hair in about 10 minutes or less, on the 4000 side. Can probably get it sharper, too. Completely worth the money, and very easy to use after a few minutes of reading - don't waste any money on pre-built sharpeners - they suck.
They are the most common types of sharpening stones available. Experts consider them as one of the best stones to choose from. The most highlighting feature of this type of stone is that they are available in different grit levels which is super useful for the users. Before using them you have to dip them in the water or soak them in it for about five to fifteen minutes. Which is also the reason for what they become very brittle due to constant soaking and drying.
Discover the great variety of sharpening stones (also known as whetstones) that we have available at your disposal here on our website! The sharpening stones are the most popular accessories for maintaining and sharpening the blades of kitchen knives. We offer you a wide selection of different types of sharpening stones with different levels of abrasiveness for knives with different levels of blade hardness. As a general rule, the harder a blade is, the finer must be the grit of the sharpening stone used to sharpen its edge. In here you can find a large diversity of Arkansas stones, natural sharpening stones, and Japanese whetstones from the best brands of the market. So, forget about having blunt knives in your kitchen and choose one of our sharpening stones to make sure your knives always maintain a great precision and cutting performance.

I've been using these stones for the past day, and they work great. Once you get the technique down that works for you, you can sharpen any knife to the point it can cut through news paper. Tip: make sure you count the amount of times you pass through the stone on one side and do that same amount on the other side. What I usually do is if I know the knife is very dull or chipped, I do 100 passes on each side using the 400 grit. I test the blade on thick paper and if it cuts through I test it on news paper. If it doesn't cut through the news paper I do another 50 passes on each side. Repeat this until the blade can cut through newspaper. After, on the 1000,3000, and then the 8000 grit stone I do 50 passes on each side. This should make the blade very smoothe cutting and polish it. I plan on getting a strop or piece of leather to further polish the blade. The only thing I don't like about this is that this package is that it does not come with a dressing stone so you can re flatten/level the stone after using them.


Some stones need water, while other stones need oil for floating the swarf (small metal filings created when sharpening) away. Simply apply a few drops of either oil or water directly to the stone. (We recommend using an inexpensive spray bottle for applying the water.) The lubricant you need is determined by the type of stone you are using. Water stones and diamond stones require water. Oil stones such as India, Crystolon and Arkansas stones use oil for a lubricant. 
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