As always try to maintain the same number of stroke for both of the sides to give each side same edge. After ending the process, you should always clean your blade and sharpener with care. You can take good care of the stone by scrubbing the stone with water and liquid soap. As the stone is a medium grit one, you can’t expect to get a high sharpness out of it. To sum up, its a good sharpener.
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Before you start sharpening, soak the stone in water for around five to 10 minutes, until it absorbs the water and a liquid film appears on the surface. After soaking, splash some water on top, and re-splash during the process if it ever gets too dry. You'll get a dark, splotch of steel and stone building up on the stone while you're sharpening the blade. This is totally normal so just splash the stone with some water to clean it off and allow it to perform more efficiently. 
★ EASY AND SAFE TO USE – We designed this honing stone with the upmost attention to detail when it came to ease of use and safety. Your kit is super easy to assemble and comes with a Silicone Base that holds the stone within the Non-Slip Bamboo Base so there is absolutely no slippage while you work. The Bonus Knife Sharpening Angle Guide will put your blade on the optimal angle for you and protect your fingers throughout the sharpening process.
While sharpening your knife, Place the blade across the stone, and tilt at the desired angle. For most kitchen cutlery, this is somewhere between 15 and 35 degrees. The optimum angle should be stated in any paperwork you have for your cutlery, but use 20 degrees if you are not certain. With your wrists held rigid, draw the blade against the stone. This grinding action will remove a thin layer of the blade. Periodically move the stone so that you are working on a different section of the blade. Ensure that the blade is sharpened to a point by rubbing the stone on each side of the blade until the tip of the blade reaches the desired sharpness.
These types of stones need to splashing of oil on the surface before you use them for sharpening. By this technique, the residue of the process is cleared away during sharpening strokes. One of the types of this oil stone is the Arkansas stone that uses natural oil. This liquidation process is essential because it ultimately contributes to the life cycle of the stone by preserving it for years to come. Also, they help to carry out the process very smoothly.
Aluminum-Oxide oil stones are very popular man-made sharpening stones produced by an abrasives company called Norton and which are commonly called India Stones. Generally less expensive than Arkansas stones (aka Novaculite), these stones are graded coarse, medium, and fine and are designed for fast cutting. Yet, when the fine grit is used, they can also produce a relatively fine edge. Also, because India Oil Stones are both softer and coarser than Arkansas Stones, they are commonly used in conjunction with Novaculite to cut the initial edge bevels or, repair extremely dull or damaged edges before refining and polishing the bevel with an Arkansas Stone.
This is an important but often confusing aspect of the sharpening process. When you sharpen knives, especially on coarser stones, you'll notice a burr form on the opposite side of the edge. It can be difficult to see, but easy to feel. Carefully feel for the burr by running your finger from the spine of the knife to the edge. The burr will jump from side to side as you sharpen each edge, and once you've felt the burr move to both sides, you can move to the next finer stone. Once you get to the finest grit, the burr will become smaller and smaller!
All stones require either water or oil as a lubricant to sharpen the knife. We prefer water stones because they’re easier to use, less messy and don’t have the possibility to go rancid like oil does. If you choose a water stone, all you have to do is either add water to the stone before placing the knife on the surface, or soak the stone in water for 10 minutes before use. You’ll want to read the instruction for the stone you purchase to find out how to use it properly.
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