BearMoo is a market-leader in the manufacture of top-grade sharpening stones for kitchen knives. This particular sharpening stone features a top grade dual sided construction which makes it ideal for sharpening of the edges as well as the polishing and finishing. The coarse side features 3000 grit while the fine side boasts 8000 grit for added convenience.


first time buying a sharping stone. i bought this because i wanted to sharpen kitchen knives. you have to practice to get good at it, use a knife you don't care about because you might mess it up. there is some conflicting instructions online on how to use, water or no water. read as much as you can about using stones and practice, practice , practice. look up videos on youtube and internet. i had fun using it, BUY IF YOU WANT TO LEARN here is some stuff i found, they all sound like professionals http://video.about.com/culinaryarts/Sharpen-Knives-With-a-Whetston.htm?rd=1 http://culinaryarts.about.com/od/knivescutlery/ht/whetstone.htm this is a video that says don't use water http://video.about.com/culinaryarts/Sharpen-Knives-With-a-Whetston.htm?rd=1 this is a youtube video that i watched that uses water. *informative http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFIg9Cm-nJg
A nice sharpened blade can save your day while you have a busy schedule ahead of you. It will save your time and help you to do the job smoothly with great ease. And for that sharpened blade, you really need a superb stone as that will take care of the edge for you. In this section, we tried to present the 5 best sharpening stones before you so that you don’t need to be overwhelmed by the vast number of products out there.

Second step: Now is time to do the actual sharpening. If you have a combination whetstone (meaning that it has two faces with different grit), you always need to start with the coarse grit, and then, the final polishing of the blade is done with a fine grit. While smootly sliding the edge of your knife's blade across the surface of the stone, try to always maintain a stable angle between the blade and stone (in between 15 and 30 degrees). You can use a sharpening angle guide to help you maintain the right angle at all times. 

"Sharpening is like a hangover cure," says Laurie Timpson, founder of Savernake Knives in Wiltshire. "If there was a cure and you knew about it, I'd stay at your house, crash on your sofa and have whatever it was when I woke up. Everyone would have it and there'd be no discussion. Everybody says they've created a perfect sharpening technique, and they haven't." 
Place the index and middle finger of your other hand on the tip of the blade. Apply pressure and swipe the blade down in a pulling motion. Release pressure, and move the knife back up to your starting point. Apply pressure only when stroking down; otherwise, you’ll risk cutting into the stone. Repeat the up-and-down swiping motion; with each swipe, inch your two fingers along the blade, in the direction of the heel. When you’ve reached the heel of the blade, use the index finger of the opposite hand (which should already be placed on the heel) for extra support. Run a finger along the opposite edge of the knife. There should be a slight ridge, or burr.
At first, you need to grip the tool or lock it in a vice to prevent slipping. You can also add some honing oil to the grit on the side of the Puck. Next, you should grasp the Puck firmly with the thumb and the fingers whilst supporting it by the palm of your strong hand. Then you move the Puck in a circular motion as you move along the whole cutting edge that needs to be sharpened.

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Hobby microscope view of a 220 grit diamond sharpening stone. Tiny diamonds are electroplated to a perforated metal carrier strip and bonded to a plastic backing. The feature identified with the red line across it measures about 0.08 mm across. The dark area at upper right is a void designed to allow for swarf created during sharpening to be cleared from the diamonds. This relatively coarse stone would be used to reshape a damaged blade edge which would be refined by finer grit stones.
When starting out sharpening, it won’t be long before you hear about the “toothy” vs “polished” edge. It will suffice to know that a 1k stone is going to give you an edge that will perform beautifully as will a knife finished at 5k. There is a belief that a knife that has a highly polished finish, 5k and up will be so polished that it’s toothy goodness will be erased. This knife will not bite into the skin of a tomato for example because the edge is too polished, it will slide over the top. This is not always true, if the knife has been sharpened well, i.e. if Side A and Side B of the blade meet precisely at the Apex of the knife, that edge will slide into a tomato quite beautifully. I have seen many brand new Japanese knives with highly polished 8k edges that no tomato skin can stand up to.
The grit range is important only in regards to the type of knives you will sharpen. It is entirely up to the consumer and how they utilize their knives. Obviously you want a stone that is capable of sharpening all your blades to the appropriate sharpness. As a rule of thumb, the higher the grit, the more you will be able to get the finest razor's edge. However, this might mean several more swipes back and forth along the stone, which can be quite time consuming.

The toughest angle to master is the angle at which you'll sharpen the edge of the knife. For a Japanese knife, that should be around 12-15 degrees. Before you reach for the protractor, a good test is to get roughly half an index finger's gap between the spine of the knife and the stone (see above). Remember to remove your finger before you start sharpening. For a Western-style knife, you want an angle of about 20°, so raise it ever-so-slightly higher.
They are undoubtedly the best sharpening stones available in the market. Due to their strength and long lasting abilities, they are the number one product category. As they are made from diamond they are very expensive which is their only downside. But if you can get one of these they will serve you for your lifetime easily without any doubt. Diamond honing stones are best.
A sharpening stone is made of particles of abrasive material that are sintered or bonded together. The blade is moved across the stone and the steel is worn away, which creates the edge. However, at the same time, the stone is also worn away to reveal new, coarse particles. As a general rule, the softer the stone, the more rapidly it will wear and will be more aggressive in use. Harder stones don’t wear as quickly.
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Once sufficiently wet, it's time to position the stone on something solid, so it doesn't move about during sharpening. Many come with holders, but you can just place it on a slightly damp tea towel on the table. The stone should be roughly perpendicular to your body, though Warner told me it is sometimes easier to angle it ever so slightly to the right (if you're right handed). 
Furthermore, Novaculite consists of several different layers of stone of different densities, grit sizes, and colors. Thus, the red Novaculite layer (aka Washita Stone) is the both the softest and most coarse while, the next most coarse/hard grade is the grey/white Soft Arkansas stone; both of which cut relatively fast for a hard whetstone material and thus, they are an excellent choice for refining a bevel. Then, the next grade of coarseness/hardness is the hard Arkansas stone which is used to polish the bevel rather than define it and, last there are the grades of Hard Black and Hard Translucent Arkansas stones which are used for extremely fine honing and polishing of a cutting edge. Plus, it’s also the primary material in “Charnley Forest” (English) and “Turkey” oilstones.
I first received my Kamikoto knife as a gift. I have found my new favorite knife! I am very pleased with the balanced grip, which in itself is a work of ergonomic art. I have never used a single bevel blade before and, after a bit of experimenting, find it an improvement for several tasks. Based on my experience with the Kamikoto knife, I purchased the Knife Set for my son who is a graduate chef of many years experience. He also is very pleased with his gift.
Cerax and Suehiro stones from Suehiro are a little harder, and as such do not wear down as quickly as the classic Japanese water stones. The 8000 grit stone will perhaps give you the best cutting edge with a mirror polish on chisels and similar blades. Suehiro also makes a small combination stone for those who do not sharpen tools all that often and are reluctant to spend extra for a Cerax stone.

Now you may wonder, if a finer stone produces a better cutting edge why do I need a coarse stone at all? The answer is that finer stones work much more slowly than coarse ones. The amount of metal a fine stone removes with each pass is much less than what a coarse stone removes. If you have an edge with a good shape to it from a coarse stone, this is not a problem because the fine stone doesn’t have to remove much metal to improve the edge. If the edge is dull, it will take many times longer to reshape it with a fine stone than it would with a coarse one.


My first set of sharpening stones so I have nothing to compare them to. For $50, though, great price to get into the world of sharpening. Stones are great and easy to use. Was able to put hair shaving edges on knives. Took a couple of knives to feel comfortable and better with the process and how to sharpen, but the stones you get work great. Here's the secret though. Get the green leather stoping block as well. As great as the stone are, I have found that stroping the knife after the fact is what really brings out that razor edge. And after using the knife, stroping it again, will restore and keep it razor sharp. Hope you enjoy it as much as I am.

Once sufficiently wet, it's time to position the stone on something solid, so it doesn't move about during sharpening. Many come with holders, but you can just place it on a slightly damp tea towel on the table. The stone should be roughly perpendicular to your body, though Warner told me it is sometimes easier to angle it ever so slightly to the right (if you're right handed). 
The Edgecraft Stone is one of the best sharpening stones in the market. It is equipped with 100% diamond crystals which are the best abrasive components for sharpening and also for honing a knife. This sharpening system does not need any oil or lubricating liquid to do its job. It can sharpen lots of types of knife blades including tungsten carbide knives, ceramic knives, steel and stainless steel blades.
DICTUM is about more than just tools - For more than 160 years, DICTUM has been offering an extensive range of tools, including garden tools, materials, finishes as well as knives for the kitchen and for outdoor use that meet the highest standards and requirements. In our opinion, first-class tools are defined by haptics, ergonomics, material and manufacturing quality. That is how inspiring, durable tools are made.

Actually, the company contacted me to make sure I received the stones and that I was happy with them. Excellent service. The stones are great! I'm pretty much a novice so the clear instructions that came with the stones and the eBook instructions were wonderful. The eBook had quality pictures demonstrating the use of the stones and the written instructions were clear and to the point. Within minutes of opening the box I had the stones figured out and sharpening my AF survival knife, my pocket knife and a couple of my wife's kitchen knives...which included a very expensive chef's knife. Very satisfied with this product and highly recommend it.
Furthermore, Novaculite consists of several different layers of stone of different densities, grit sizes, and colors. Thus, the red Novaculite layer (aka Washita Stone) is the both the softest and most coarse while, the next most coarse/hard grade is the grey/white Soft Arkansas stone; both of which cut relatively fast for a hard whetstone material and thus, they are an excellent choice for refining a bevel. Then, the next grade of coarseness/hardness is the hard Arkansas stone which is used to polish the bevel rather than define it and, last there are the grades of Hard Black and Hard Translucent Arkansas stones which are used for extremely fine honing and polishing of a cutting edge. Plus, it’s also the primary material in “Charnley Forest” (English) and “Turkey” oilstones.

One of the combinations of stones that I was introduced to several years ago is a unique one, it is a 500, 2,000 and 16,000 grit combination. I was apprehensive when I first tried this, that was thousands of knives ago, it works, it is fantastic combination. It is unique because the traditional way of thinking is that we should be doubling the grit sizes as we sharpen, for example, a 500 grit stone should be followed by a 1,000 grit, then 2,000 grit. This line of thought is meant to be flexible, it is a general rule only, I have broken it countless times.

Well made stone. Good quality. The flattening stone was a welcome bonus. The 3000 grit side is perfect for initial sharpening. A caution on the 8000 grit side - It is not remotely close to 8000 grit. It seemed closer to 4000 grit of a quality Japanese whetstone. I purchased a 6000 grit King S1 stone for final polishing. Stay away from the cheaper King 1000/6000 KW65 combination whetstone. That seems to use plastic binder which literally permanently clogs the 6000 grit side.
Both Belgian Blue and Vielsalm Coticule are ancient stone layers found in the Belgian Ardenne Mountains with characteristics similar to both Novaculite and Siliciclastic sedimentary stone in that it is a metamorphic stone consisting of both gray and yellow volcanic ash mixed with tiny Spessartite Garnet crystals suspended in a clay matrix. However, due to its geology, both types of stone occur only in vertical seams sandwiched between two thick layers of bluish-purple slate and thus, they must be meticulously extracted mostly by hand. However, this type of extraction process is both very time-consuming and very labor-intensive and, quarrymen can only extract the stone for a few months each year due to inclement weather conditions. Consequently, both Belgium Blue and Coticule whetstones tend to be somewhat expensive.

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In recent years, some whetstone manufacturers have started producing ceramic whetstones made from hard, ceramic, powders that are mixed with Aluminum Oxide and then sintered to form a solid. But, rather than using oil or water to lubricate the whetstone, ceramic whetstones are meant to be used without lubrication and thus, they provide a significant advantage for chefs who need to keep their knives sharp but, who do not have either the room or time for using a bench water stone. Thus, they are commonly available as either bench stones, pocket stones, round rods, or triangular rods.
I've been using these stones for the past day, and they work great. Once you get the technique down that works for you, you can sharpen any knife to the point it can cut through news paper. Tip: make sure you count the amount of times you pass through the stone on one side and do that same amount on the other side. What I usually do is if I know the knife is very dull or chipped, I do 100 passes on each side using the 400 grit. I test the blade on thick paper and if it cuts through I test it on news paper. If it doesn't cut through the news paper I do another 50 passes on each side. Repeat this until the blade can cut through newspaper. After, on the 1000,3000, and then the 8000 grit stone I do 50 passes on each side. This should make the blade very smoothe cutting and polish it. I plan on getting a strop or piece of leather to further polish the blade. The only thing I don't like about this is that this package is that it does not come with a dressing stone so you can re flatten/level the stone after using them.
Some stones need water, while other stones need oil for floating the swarf (small metal filings created when sharpening) away. Simply apply a few drops of either oil or water directly to the stone. (We recommend using an inexpensive spray bottle for applying the water.) The lubricant you need is determined by the type of stone you are using. Water stones and diamond stones require water. Oil stones such as India, Crystolon and Arkansas stones use oil for a lubricant.
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