This is exactly what we've needed! We have a pull-through version of a knife sharpener, but it's more for fine tuning. Our kitchen knives have seen many years of love, though, and were in desperate need of some proper attention. The stone worked magic on them. I'm very impressed with how significant the difference is. Frankly, I'm a little irritated with myself for now doing more research when I bought that pull-through one, because this stone is fantastic.
A well made and Versatile Chef's Knife I received this in 2 days with prime, and it arrived in perfect shape.This is a marvelous Chefs knife! I find it well balanced, and very sharp.It does require some knowledge on how to sharpen the one-sided bevel on the blade, but once you learn it's easy to maintain a razor sharp edge! I also really appreciate the wood box it comes in.The slight curve of the blade also makes it ideal to ""rock"" when finely chopping herbs. Very Pleased.
The Sharpening and Specialty lines of waterstones from Naniwa are available in several packages of three to five stones. The Specialty line is the same as the Sharpening line, but half the thickness and therefore less expensive. Both the Sharpening and the Specialty stones are 8 1/4" long by 2 3/4" wide, amply sized for most knives and tools. These are a higher grade stone that do not require soaking before use. While you would need a flattening stone in addition, these kits are a good way to enter into premium grade waterstones.
When you are giving a blade finer finishing it also becomes very prone to dullness as you use it in your day to day life. So to avoid that from happening you can use this 3000 grit level to give the blades medium level finishing. The advantage of doing it is that it will ultimately add more durability when you are cutting something with your blade.
This King’s sharpening stone is a double-sided whetstone; one side features a 1000 grit, and the other a 6000 grit size. Now, is it affordable? Not quite; but it’s still reasonably priced; you’ll get excellent value for the price, that’s for sure. Easy to use (well, once you figure it out) and with an outstanding sharpening performance, what else could you ask for?
Push the point you want to sharpen with your fingers. While keeping the angle and pushing the point with your fingers, stroke the blade until it reaches the other edge of the whetstone, then pull the blade back until it reaches the edge of the whetstone. This back and forth is counted as one stroke. Repeat it for about five strokes until you can see or feel some small burrs (edge curvatures) Then move the position of your fingers to where you have not sharpened yet, and repeat this five strokes of sharpening processed from the tip to the base of the blade.

All stones require either water or oil as a lubricant to sharpen the knife. We prefer water stones because they’re easier to use, less messy and don’t have the possibility to go rancid like oil does. If you choose a water stone, all you have to do is either add water to the stone before placing the knife on the surface, or soak the stone in water for 10 minutes before use. You’ll want to read the instruction for the stone you purchase to find out how to use it properly.
When you are first beginning to learn about this technology, one of the terms you need to familiarize yourself with is grit. You do not need to necessarily remember the literal definition of it. But, you need to understand that the amount of grit a whetstone has goes a long way in determining its performance. Most notably, each grit amount can be used for different situations. Take note that the lower the grit is, the coarser or less fine it is. So, if you have extremely dull blades that need to be brought back to life or ones that are damaged, go with grits less than 1000.  As for 1000-grit itself, this can be considered the standard and is a good starting point for most knives that have simply lost their edge.
Learning sharpening technique requires focus even without worrying about the stone itself. Stones that require frequent flattening, soaking and cleaning, or that take a long time to create an edge can be a source of frustration to some beginning sharpeners. Keep in mind your willingness perform regular maintenance when choosing a starting set of stones.
You’ll know you’re reached a stopping point when you can feel the slight catch of the bevel on the edge of the blade, by carefully running your finger in the direction of the blade, or by cutting through a sheet of paper. When the knife cuts cleanly through the paper, it’s time to hone the blade. Read our guide for more information about honing vs sharpening.
Lubricate the stone. Some stones specifically use oil or water, and if that's the case, ensure you're using the recommended lubricant. Most importantly, whichever lubricant you choose, do not change it after the first use. When using oils, only use those approved for sharpening stones. Food oils such as vegetable and olive oil should never be applied! Some options like diamond stones, and others, don't need any lubricant at all, so be sure to check the stone's instructions.

Before using a sharpening stone to sharpen your knife, moisten it with water or oil. This moisture will absorb the metal and stone dust that will be created during the sharpening process. It also makes the stone more effective at sharpening the knife. Diamond stones sometimes have an interrupted surface covered with dozens of recessed dots that collects the removed metal swarf and keeps it out of the way as you sharpen your blade.
Stone is awesome, stand and rubber holder are awesome. Sharpened my Benchmade griptilian with a 154CM (58-61HRC) stainless steel blade to easily shaving hair in about 10 minutes or less, on the 4000 side. Can probably get it sharper, too. Completely worth the money, and very easy to use after a few minutes of reading - don't waste any money on pre-built sharpeners - they suck.
Silicone Carbide whetstones on the other hand, are the fastest cutting of the three types of oil stones and the stones made by Norton are called Crystolon Stones. Also they too are graded as either fine, medium, or coarse stones depending on their grit. But, although these stones will not produce an edge as fine as Arkansas Oil Stones or India Oil Stones, their fast cutting ability makes them ideal for sharpening tools as well as for cutting the initial edge bevel on extremely dull knives or repairing the edge on damaged blades. Last, because they sharpen so quickly, it a common practice to start with a coarse Crystolon Oil Stone and then progress to either a medium or fine India Oil Stone and then to finish with an Arkansas Oil Stone.
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