What a bamboo base, or any similar base, is going to do is stabilize the whetstone to ensure it does not slip while you are sharpening your knife. The reason why you will see bamboo a lot is due to the properties of the material. Bamboo itself is a wood and is actually a bit harder than oak and ash. Even for flooring, it adds stability and that is exactly what you are looking for to prevent any slippage.

Here at MyChefKnives, we are glad to be able to offer you a large selection of sharpening stones from some of the best brands of the market such as KAI, Kasumi, Wusthof, and more! Whether you call it sharpening stone or simply a whetstone, this is undoubtedly a very useful accessory in every kitchen, and it is a great option for unexperienced cooks that do not feel at ease using a sharpening steel. Given that not all kitchen knives are constructed in the same way, there are different types of sharpening stones that adapt to each different level of blade hardness and rigidity. However, due to the great number of options available, we can understand that choosing a sharpening stone is not an easy thing to do. Therefore, below we offer you a brief explanation that can guide you to choose the right whetstone for your knife.
While sharpening your knife, Place the blade across the stone, and tilt at the desired angle. For most kitchen cutlery, this is somewhere between 15 and 35 degrees. The optimum angle should be stated in any paperwork you have for your cutlery, but use 20 degrees if you are not certain. With your wrists held rigid, draw the blade against the stone. This grinding action will remove a thin layer of the blade. Periodically move the stone so that you are working on a different section of the blade. Ensure that the blade is sharpened to a point by rubbing the stone on each side of the blade until the tip of the blade reaches the desired sharpness.
Beginning on the right side of the knife, move from tip to heel and heel to tip, then flip the knife and repeat. For the left side, it’s opposite—start at the top of the stone to reach the heel area completely. So, you will move from heel to tip and then tip to heel. Remember to apply and release pressure as you did earlier, exactly the same as in Step 2, but with light, refining pressure.
Though "whetstone" is often mistaken as a reference to the water sometimes used to lubricate such stones, the term is based on the word "whet", which means to sharpen a blade,[1][2] not on the word "wet". The verb nowadays usually used to describe the process of using a sharpening stone is to sharpen, but the older term to whet is still sometimes used. The term to stone is so rare in this sense that it is no longer mentioned in for example the Oxford Living Dictionaries.[3][4] One of the most common mistaken idioms in English involves the phrase "to whet your appetite", too often mistakenly written as "to wet". But to "whet" quite appropriately means "to sharpen" one's appetite, not to douse it with water.
In addition, there are three broad grades of Japanese Water Stones consisting of the Ara-to (rough stone), the Naka-to (middle/medium stone) and, the Shiage-to (finishing stone). However, it should be noted that the various grades of natural Japanese Water Stones vary widely in both density and grit size from stone to stone and thus, they do not translate well to American or European abrasive standards. Furthermore, because they are significantly softer than Novaculite, Japanese Water Stones must be flattened more often and do not last as long as a either Novaculite or Coticule stones. But, because they form a slurry of fine particles when used, they also do a superior job of both cutting and polishing.
To be honest, sharpening blades is more of an art form than anything. There is a reason why there are so many online tutorials and guides that explain how to do it. The most important thing to remember is this; you can incorrectly sharpen a blade. Doing so can damage the blade and leave you in a worse spot than what you were initially. Unless you have experience doing this and really have a knack for it, you will most certainly want to look for models that include instructions or access to online guides (or an eBook).
Having all your tools function well is a motivation for your work, and it makes work even easier. Sharpening stones are great tools that keep your blades sharp all the time. Most of the top ranking sharpening stones have a variety of capabilities making them ideal for hunting blades, hand tools, and even kitchen knives. Most of these stones are very affordable and easy to maintain as all you need is dip them in water before use or splash water on them.
Cross-contamination of food can lead to serious health risks like food poisoning or unintended exposure to food allergens . If your kitchen staff members know how to prevent cross-contamination by correctly storing and preparing food, you can save the time and money that would be wasted on improperly handled food. By making the effort to separate your foods while storing and preparing them, sanitizing your kitchen surfaces and equipment, and practicing proper personal hygiene, you can create a safe and sanitary kitchen environment that is better for your customers, your employees, and your business. What is Cross-Contamination? Cross-contamination occurs when disease-causing microorganisms, like bacteria and viruses, are transferred from on
I bought this stone to get my grand father’s straight razor back to being shave ready. Originally I was looking for a 4000/8000 combo but I liked the price and didn’t think the 3000 would be an issue. The stone arrived in a nice reusable package to keep to safe from breaking, along with a lap stone to keep the sharpening stone level. Prepping the stone was a beeeze and it didn’t take long before there was a true edge back on the straight razor. Definitely a good stone at an excellent price.
For instance, if you have a kitchen knife with a strong blade that has a hardness rating of 58 HRC in the Rockwell scale such as the knives from the popular Wusthof Classic series, you'll need a sharpening stone with fine grit. On the other hand, if your knife has a lover level of hardness such as 53 HRC, then you will need a whetstone with coarse grit.
A fine sharpening stone is widely used in the day to day life of a wide variety of people. It will save your valuable energy and effort by keeping the tools sharpened enough for you. Besides, it will help you to maintain your blades for longer use and make the lifespan a bit bigger. No more chit-chat, now we will present you the 5 best product reviews to help you choose the right one for you.
You've acquired a good chef's knife, you're using it almost daily to make tasty dinners for the family, and it's stored in a nice knife rack or a magnet for safekeeping. So why stop there? Keeping that knife's edge fine will make cooking not only safer but, let's face it, much more fun. Whether you've spent £150 on a high-end knife or under a tenner on a dinky paring knife, keeping it sharp is crucial. 
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