“There’s no real end to learning how to sharpen knives because there’s always something more to improve on,” explains Vincent Lau, a sharpener at Korin, an early importer of Japanese knives to the U.S., who has trained under company founder Chiharu Sugai for eight years. That shouldn’t be a deterrent, however. Basic whetstone sharpening is simply a matter of finding the proper angle.
So you are going to start at the heel and you are going to time it so that it goes all the way across. You go from one side to the other. You also want to make sure that your stone, I am not going to use as much pressure as I normally would because I cannot mount it on this showcase, you want to alternate from side to side to keep your bevel centered. Some people will take and do three times on one side and then three times on the other, the problem is that your backhand is never as good as your forehand and you end up cheating and you are going to end up with a blade that is offset. That is going to take it and thin down, you are going to get a thin bevel right on the edge. Once you get that V established, you can go from the coarser side to the finer side.
Now move the blade – with a little pressure – in regular movements up and down along the sharpening stone. Always maintain the angle between the blade and stone. You will notice a burr become visible after five or so movements. Mentally divide the blade into three sections if the knife has a large blade. Always start with the tip and work back towards the bolster.
I would say they are worth the money. Go for it. I took a blunted Pampered Chef kitchen knife from completely dull to razor sharp in about an hour (of bumbling and repairing mistakes LOL) heavy grinding. If you have a severely damaged blade, grab one of those cheesey two sided stones from Harbor Freight to do your heavy grinding. From there these stones will work very well.
Nail the technique: Begin by positioning the knife with the edge facing up. Place your thumb on the spine and your index finger on the heel. Hold the knife so that the blade forms a straight line with the rest of your arm. Position the knife so that the bevel of the edge is flat against the whetstone. Note that this angle will be different for every knife; it’s a matter of feeling it out.
Sharpal 178N TRANSFORMAN 3-In-1 Diamond Round and Tapered Sharpal 178N TRANSFORMAN 3-In-1 Diamond Round and Tapered Rod Sharpener makes it easy to sharpen all kinds of knives including those with serrations gut hooks fishhooks and pointed tools. Industrial monocrystalline diamond is electroplated in nickel onto a steel base. Sharpen dry. No messy oil needed. Fine 600 grit (25 ...  More + Product Details Close

When I contact the company customer support, they told me is because the way I sharpen my knives are not correct, I put too much pressure on it, so I asked them if that's true, since I am using the same method to sharpen my knives, why it won't happened to the other side (#8000) and the other stone (400/1000)? They don't even give me any answer to that question at all.
For instance, if you have a kitchen knife with a strong blade that has a hardness rating of 58 HRC in the Rockwell scale such as the knives from the popular Wusthof Classic series, you'll need a sharpening stone with fine grit. On the other hand, if your knife has a lover level of hardness such as 53 HRC, then you will need a whetstone with coarse grit.

Well made stone. Good quality. The flattening stone was a welcome bonus. The 3000 grit side is perfect for initial sharpening. A caution on the 8000 grit side - It is not remotely close to 8000 grit. It seemed closer to 4000 grit of a quality Japanese whetstone. I purchased a 6000 grit King S1 stone for final polishing. Stay away from the cheaper King 1000/6000 KW65 combination whetstone. That seems to use plastic binder which literally permanently clogs the 6000 grit side.


I bought this wonderful knife on faith. I was told in March when it would ship. I received emails alerting me that my knife would be arriving as promised. It came early, thanks! Tthe quality and feel of the knife exceeded my wildest dreams. I lived in Tsubami ahi where knives are hand forged. This has a place amongst the best. I have it on display for now as I view it as a supreme work of art.
★ EASY AND SAFE TO USE – We designed this honing stone with the upmost attention to detail when it came to ease of use and safety. Your kit is super easy to assemble and comes with a Silicone Base that holds the stone within the Non-Slip Bamboo Base so there is absolutely no slippage while you work. The Bonus Knife Sharpening Angle Guide will put your blade on the optimal angle for you and protect your fingers throughout the sharpening process.
All stones require either water or oil as a lubricant to sharpen the knife. We prefer water stones because they’re easier to use, less messy and don’t have the possibility to go rancid like oil does. If you choose a water stone, all you have to do is either add water to the stone before placing the knife on the surface, or soak the stone in water for 10 minutes before use. You’ll want to read the instruction for the stone you purchase to find out how to use it properly.

To be honest, sharpening blades is more of an art form than anything. There is a reason why there are so many online tutorials and guides that explain how to do it. The most important thing to remember is this; you can incorrectly sharpen a blade. Doing so can damage the blade and leave you in a worse spot than what you were initially. Unless you have experience doing this and really have a knack for it, you will most certainly want to look for models that include instructions or access to online guides (or an eBook).
This is a question that technically has no bearing on the type of model you choose. But, it does give you an idea of how important it is to ensure that all your knives are properly sharpened. Do you believe it is asinine that dull blades are more dangerous than sharp blades? Well, if you really stop and think about it that is exactly the case. Now, if a dull blade and a sharp blade both landed on your foot accidentally, the latter would cause more damage. But, dull blades are more dangerous in this sense.
So you are going to start at the heel and you are going to time it so that it goes all the way across. You go from one side to the other. You also want to make sure that your stone, I am not going to use as much pressure as I normally would because I cannot mount it on this showcase, you want to alternate from side to side to keep your bevel centered. Some people will take and do three times on one side and then three times on the other, the problem is that your backhand is never as good as your forehand and you end up cheating and you are going to end up with a blade that is offset. That is going to take it and thin down, you are going to get a thin bevel right on the edge. Once you get that V established, you can go from the coarser side to the finer side.
This is a question that technically has no bearing on the type of model you choose. But, it does give you an idea of how important it is to ensure that all your knives are properly sharpened. Do you believe it is asinine that dull blades are more dangerous than sharp blades? Well, if you really stop and think about it that is exactly the case. Now, if a dull blade and a sharp blade both landed on your foot accidentally, the latter would cause more damage. But, dull blades are more dangerous in this sense.
The size of the sharpening stone is a factor to consider before purchasing. The size of your tools determines the size of the stone. If you need a stone for kitchen knives, then a 6-inch stone is good but will not be as effective on larger blades. An 8-12 inch stone is safe to use on hand tools and larger blades. There are pocket size stones that you can carry around. It is crucial for the sharpening stone to be wider than the blade.
Manufacturer contacted and sent a new one for replacement. Great customer service but replacement item was nicked on the corner. It was still usable so i didn't bother to ask for another replacement. I would recommend item to be shipped in another box instead of an over-sized yellow envelop which is not adequate protection. Item sharpen my knife pretty good though..
Hobby microscope view of a 220 grit diamond sharpening stone. Tiny diamonds are electroplated to a perforated metal carrier strip and bonded to a plastic backing. The feature identified with the red line across it measures about 0.08 mm across. The dark area at upper right is a void designed to allow for swarf created during sharpening to be cleared from the diamonds. This relatively coarse stone would be used to reshape a damaged blade edge which would be refined by finer grit stones.
The price of a whetstone is most often indicative of its quality, which directly correlates to how hard the stone is. “The more expensive stone, typically, is comprised of a harder material, which is efficient at grinding metal off of a good-quality knife,” Lau says. “It allows you to sharpen quicker [and] it allows you to sharpen a very high-quality knife, whereas a cheaper stone may not create a good edge if a knife is made from a very hard metal.” A well-made whetstone should cost $60 to $70.
2. Although I’ve been sharpening knives for a while, I never could get a knife sharp using the freehand method, I’ve had to rely on various jigs to set & maintain a constant angle to the bevel. To begin with, the Lanksy knife sharpener kit was my main tool, but then I found a South African jig made by Warthog Knife Sharpeners. I still have their first model, which, if memory serves me, came out in the late 1990’s. This has since been upgraded & is supplied with a diamond stone, which is worthless unless it’s going to be used for ceramic knives. However-the Warthog & the Warthog Multi-Blade’s modus operandi has the knife moving ABOVE the stone, unlike the Lanksy / Edge Pro / Edge Pro Chinese copies & variants. ( No oil / water dripping off the stone from above the knife). Also, the Warthogs use any bench-size whetstone available to its owner, a very big plus if you want to use your grand-dad’s old Arkansas stone.No tie in having to buy the manufacturer’s specialised stones which work only with one type of sharpening jig.
Crafted by employing methods from centuries-old traditions, the Kamikoto Toishi Sharpening Whetstone is specifically primed to hone and sharpen single bevel Japanese steel knives. The sturdy bamboo stand has been formed to hold the whetstone firmly in place during the entire sharpening process, allowing for the control necessary to form the perfect chiselled edge. The Toishi Sharpening Whetstone features two sides with different grits; the 1000 grit side is the coarser side, utilized specifically to grind away at the rougher edge produced over multiple uses of a knife. The other side consists of a finer 3000 grit for polishing and finishing the edge of a blade, the final step in a sharpening cycle.
Stellar Knife Sharpening Whetstone 400 & 1000 Grit is a stellar sharpening stone with a two piece precision sharpening 400/1000 combination grit for enhanced performance. The firm but porous structure of the stone continuously releases small particles during the sharpening process that when combined with water are responsible for sharpening the knife blade. Features a non-slip base stand that ensures the stone stays stable while in use.
×