Water stones can also be made out of natural or synthetic materials and they are fast becoming the most popular type of whetstone as they only require the use of water to lubricate the stone. They are not as messy to work with as an oil stone and deliver fast sharpening results but for even better results, soak the stone in water for 5 or 10 minutes.

Every finished product you serve to your customers goes through a number of steps from growing, harvesting, and shipping to receiving, prepping, and serving. In each one of these steps, potential food safety hazards that might sicken or injure the final consumer are present. However, with careful planning, these hazards can be prevented, reduced to safe levels, or even eliminated altogether. Keep reading to learn what a HACCP plan is and the steps needed to create your own. What does HACCP Stand For? HACCP stands for Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points. It is a system restaurant operators put in place to help them identify and react to dangerous biological, chemical, or physical food contamination. The goal of this food management s
When sharpening a knife using a sharpening stone, keep sharpening until enough steel has been removed to form a burr on the edge of the blade. This burr will be removed during the honing and polishing process, but it is the easiest way to ensure that you have removed enough metal, exposing a completely new knife edge. Once the knife is polished, it will be ready for use again.
Repeat the process on the opposite side of the blade, this time with the edge facing down, index finger on the spine and thumb on the heel. Because the direction of the edge has changed, you’ll now be applying pressure when swiping up. To ensure consistent pressure, avoid switching hands. Grind the full length of the blade along the whetstone, and check for a burr.
The price of a whetstone is most often indicative of its quality, which directly correlates to how hard the stone is. “The more expensive stone, typically, is comprised of a harder material, which is efficient at grinding metal off of a good-quality knife,” Lau says. “It allows you to sharpen quicker [and] it allows you to sharpen a very high-quality knife, whereas a cheaper stone may not create a good edge if a knife is made from a very hard metal.” A well-made whetstone should cost $60 to $70.
We begin our whetstone sharpening process with a 400 grit stone to shape the edge of the blade and develop a burr along the edge of the knife. Once the shape is set and we have a burr along the full length of the knife we move on to the 1000 grit stone to refine the edge and begin removing the burr, followed by the 5000 grit fine stone stone to give a beautiful sharp edge on the blade. We finish off each knife on a leather stropping block which removes the final remnants of the burr and gives a strong and lasting edge.
It is important to mention that  knives with lower levels of hardness are easier to sharpen, but they need to be sharpened more frequently because they lose faster the sharpness of their edge. Therefore, as you can imagine, knives with harder blades retain for longer time their sharpness, and that is why they need finer whetstones, because stones with coarse grit would end up actually damaging the blade.
Whetstones may be natural or artificial stones. Artificial stones usually come in the form of a bonded abrasive composed of a ceramic such as silicon carbide (carborundum) or of aluminium oxide (corundum). Bonded abrasives provide a faster cutting action than natural stones. They are commonly available as a double-sided block with a coarse grit on one side and a fine grit on the other enabling one stone to satisfy the basic requirements of sharpening. Some shapes are designed for specific purposes such as sharpening scythes, drills or serrations.[9]
As you probably have guessed, knives are easier to sharpen on longer stones. The width of the stone is less important than the length when sharpening knives. The longer stone allows for longer sharpening strokes and contributes to faster sharpening. The longer strokes mean fewer strokes across your stone, making it easier to maintain a consistent sharpening angle. As a rule of thumb, a small knife can easily be sharpened on a large stone, but a large knife cannot easily be sharpened on a small stone.
The Juuma sharpening and honing stones offer a simplified working principle while at the same time ensuring the highest possible quality in the offered grits. Juuma Cobalt Blue stones are made of an aluminium oxide and a bonding agent. Adding cobalt serves to slow stone abrasion and increase the speed of sharpening. The speed bonus is especially marked when stoning blue steel (blue paper steel that is often used for Japanese planes and chisels). The cobalt gives the stones their blue colour. Juuma is our proprietary brand. Juuma sharpening stones are produced by a renowned Japanese whetstone manufacturer.
Chefs will do this every day, and there's no reason you shouldn't too. Before cooking, or after you've done the washing up, honing your knife will help keep it in good condition. "When you're using a honing steel, you're not actually removing any metal at all, just re-straightening that edge, to get it back in line," says Authbert. Remember that you'll still need to sharpen it every two or three months. 
The newly designed dual-sided combination whetstone from Fallkniven features a super fine white ceramic stone (0, 1 micron) with a grit of 1400 to 2000 and the dark grey ceramic stone is made of synthetic sapphires (1 micron) and has a grit of 800-1000. There is no need to add any oil or water, just lay the blade on the stone, raise the blade's spine and deburr your blade on the grey side until it has a razor-sharp edge and then use the smooth white side to get a nice polished edge.
Here at MyChefKnives, we are glad to be able to offer you a large selection of sharpening stones from some of the best brands of the market such as KAI, Kasumi, Wusthof, and more! Whether you call it sharpening stone or simply a whetstone, this is undoubtedly a very useful accessory in every kitchen, and it is a great option for unexperienced cooks that do not feel at ease using a sharpening steel. Given that not all kitchen knives are constructed in the same way, there are different types of sharpening stones that adapt to each different level of blade hardness and rigidity. However, due to the great number of options available, we can understand that choosing a sharpening stone is not an easy thing to do. Therefore, below we offer you a brief explanation that can guide you to choose the right whetstone for your knife.
Double-sided stones, with a medium grit on one side and finishing stone on the other, are popular among beginner sharpeners and convenient for home use. Lau recommends the Mizuyama two-sided whetstone ($73), with 1,000- and 6,000-grit sides, for beginners. “The stone itself is very high quality, really geared toward high-quality knives, so you can pretty much sharpen any metal with this one.”
This is an important but often confusing aspect of the sharpening process. When you sharpen knives, especially on coarser stones, you'll notice a burr form on the opposite side of the edge. It can be difficult to see, but easy to feel. Carefully feel for the burr by running your finger from the spine of the knife to the edge. The burr will jump from side to side as you sharpen each edge, and once you've felt the burr move to both sides, you can move to the next finer stone. Once you get to the finest grit, the burr will become smaller and smaller!
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You've acquired a good chef's knife, you're using it almost daily to make tasty dinners for the family, and it's stored in a nice knife rack or a magnet for safekeeping. So why stop there? Keeping that knife's edge fine will make cooking not only safer but, let's face it, much more fun. Whether you've spent £150 on a high-end knife or under a tenner on a dinky paring knife, keeping it sharp is crucial. 
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