The dual-sided whetstone is made from durable silicon carbide and has 400 grit on one side to sharpen the dullest blades and 1000 grit on the other side to create a nice smooth finish once the blade has been sharpened. The stone also forms a nice slurry that helps polish the blade for a superb shine. The stone is meant to be used with water, not oil and for best results, simply soak stone for 5-10 minutes before use, and lubricate with additional water as needed when sharpening.
Overall I am very satisfied with this purchase, workmanship on product is very good. I have used it on several kitchen knifes and obtained a very sharp edge. But this does take quite a bit of time and effort on each knife. I did not give the product 5 stars because it is already showing a good deal of ware but still works great, and maybe my expectations are not sound. I would recommend this sharpening stone, but you must remember, using this type of stone you will send a good deal of time on each knife.
Next we sharpen the opposite side of the blade. Just as you did before, sharpen the knife keeping an angle of 10' to 15'. Push the point you want to sharpen with your first, second and third fingers. While keeping the angle and pushing the point with your fingers, stroke the blade until it reaches the other edge of the whetstone. Then pull the blade back until it reaches the edge of the whetstone. This back and forth is counted as one stroke. Repeat it for about five strokes until you can see or feel some small burrs (edge curvatures).. Then move the position of your fingers to where you have not sharpened yet, and repeat this five strokes of sharpening processed from the tip to the base of the blade. When your whetstone becomes dry, occational watering during  sharpening process will also help and improve smooth sharpening.
So you are going to start at the heel and you are going to time it so that it goes all the way across. You go from one side to the other. You also want to make sure that your stone, I am not going to use as much pressure as I normally would because I cannot mount it on this showcase, you want to alternate from side to side to keep your bevel centered. Some people will take and do three times on one side and then three times on the other, the problem is that your backhand is never as good as your forehand and you end up cheating and you are going to end up with a blade that is offset. That is going to take it and thin down, you are going to get a thin bevel right on the edge. Once you get that V established, you can go from the coarser side to the finer side.
Therefore, the first step to choosing a whetstone is to determine your intended purpose and then choose your whetstone accordingly. For instance, when sharpening tools that do not require a fine edge, you should choose a relatively soft, coarse, stone such as a Norton Crystolon water stone. However, for sharpening tools that do require a fine edge, a somewhat harder Norton India oil stone would be a good choice. But, for sharpening hunting knives where an exceptionally fine edge is required, a Novaculite or Coticule oil stone would be the best but, most expensive, choice. So, the process of choosing the correct whetstone for any given purpose is to first determine how fast you would like for the stone to cut and how fine an edge you need, and then choose either a soft, coarse, stone or, a hard, fine, stone of the appropriate type and grit.
A 1000 grit wet stone is going to be plenty fine enough for most knives in a ‘typical' home kitchen. Finer hones are going to be used a lot less but will be useful useful for getting a super fine edge, on a fillet knife for example. (They are essential for a professional chef because the sharper blade will leave a slightly cleaner cut for visual appeal.)
Diamond hones are made from very small, industrial grade, diamonds adhered to the face of a metal or plastic plate. Also, because Diamonds are so much harder than any of the other sharpening materials, they tend to cut very fast and last much longer than the other whetstone materials. But, they are also often more expensive to purchase. In addition, Diamond Stones generally consist of three different styles consisting of a solid metal plate coated with an adhesive and diamond dust with holes in the plate to allow the swarf to escape, a solid plate without holes for sharpening tools with corners that might catch in the holes, and a plastic plate with islands of exposed plastic interspersed with the adhesive and diamond dust to act as a lubricant.
And the proof is in the pudding. Try stopping at 1,000 and use the knife for awhile. If it goes dull too quickly, or doesn’t push cut to your satisfaction, then invest in a 4,000. Rinse and repeat. You can take it as far as you want. You can get an edge so sharp that the only thing it will cut without damage is air. But that’s a useless edge in the kitchen.
A blade's sharpness may be tested by checking if it "bites"—begins to cut by being drawn across an object without pressure. Specialized sticks exist to check bite, though one can also use a soft ballpoint pen, such as the common white Bic Stic. A thumbnail may be used[3] at the risk of a cut, or the edge of a sheet of paper. For kitchen knives, various vegetables may be used to check bite, notably carrots, tomatoes, or cucumbers. In testing in this way, any nicks are felt as obstacles.
Conveniently bundled in one affordable set for you, our Sharp Pebble Waterstone (Grit 3000/8000) with Non-Slip Bamboo base. Grit 3000 can quickly sharp the blade while Grit 8000 is used to achieve finely polished mirror finished edge. Flattening Stone is used for leveling of Sharp Pebble Grit 3000/8000 Stone And a Knife Sharpening Guide(eBook) describing how to make the most out of the product.
Thank you so much for your unbelievably quick service and delivery. I placed my order online and within pretty much one day the package is waiting on my door step. My order was also filled perfectly, no mistakes. I sure know where I will be purchasing all my sharpening supplies in the future. Great business practice you have. Please never change it.
Hobby microscope view of a 220 grit diamond sharpening stone. Tiny diamonds are electroplated to a perforated metal carrier strip and bonded to a plastic backing. The feature identified with the red line across it measures about 0.08 mm across. The dark area at upper right is a void designed to allow for swarf created during sharpening to be cleared from the diamonds. This relatively coarse stone would be used to reshape a damaged blade edge which would be refined by finer grit stones.
P.S. The coarse DMT stones can actually be used to keep your finer grit shapton stones flat! The DMT Lapping plate can't really be used for sharpening unlike the Extra Coarse stone, and it's a bit expensive, but consider this secondary use: It flattens the soles of old planes incredibly fast! Way better than sanding belts or sandpaper spray adhesive'd to a flat surface!
Some of the videos I watched suggested soaking the stone for 12-15 minutes prior to use. One suggested using vegetable oil on the surface versus water/soaking (I used water and presoaking it for 15-minutes). So instead of a simple 'out-of-the-box-and-use' approach, it required a bit of research before sharpening a knife. Otherwise I would have given this product a 5-star rating.
But no matter where you stop and call it sharp, you are leaving some microscopic “teeth” at the very edge which will bend over to one side or the other, and may break off. This is what causes every knife edge to go dull. This is what steeling your knife does, it straightens these little teeth on the edge back up before they can bend all the way over.
The 240 grit whetstone from Sun Tiger is also quite soft and will also become dished fairly quickly. But it makes up for this by cutting very quickly and by proving useful for removing chips and nicks in the blades of chisels and knives. You can remove a chip in a knife within a few minutes, but with chisels or plane blades it is best to check often whether you haven’t dished the relatively soft stone. When you sharpen a knife, you will help the stone to stay flat for longer if you move the blade evenly over the whole stone. But if you need to sharpen a whole bunch of chisels, the stone may start out flat, cutting a nice even bevel on the first chisel, but be so dished by the last chisel that you would have to flatten the stone once more and start all over again. The softer the stone, the more it needs to be watched, and the more frequently it needs to be flattened. This is not everyone's cup of tea, but if you accept the need for this, you will enjoy the services of a wonderfully quick-working stone. The Sun Tiger 240 also needs much less pressure than, say, the Shapton 120. The softer stone simply grips and starts cutting from the first stroke.
Visually, a very sharp knife has an edge that is too small to see with the eye; it may even be hard or impossible to focus in a microscope. The shape near the edge can be highlighted by rotating the knife and watching changes in reflection. Nicks and rolled edges can also be seen, as the rolled edge provides a reflective surface, while a properly straightened edge will be invisible when viewed head-on.
This table outlines Shapton's recommendations for the choosing from the variety of stones in their line, the right grit sizes, and the gradations in which they should be used, to properly sharpen different kinds of knives and tools. The Japanese names for the various knives and tools are listed in parenthesis, which can be helpful for matching a blade with the right stones when one knows the Japanese name for the tool.

Removing the burr is fairly simple. You'll need a leather strop or block (this sort of thing), which is designed to catch the metal fibres from the knife. You could do it with a fibrous tea towel or some newspaper if you like, but I'd suggest going with leather to begin with. The motion is fairly similar to sharpening. Draw the knife over the leather, going away from the edge at roughly the same angle as when you sharpened. 


The 8,000 grit Kitayama is definitely a popular 8K stone, it is my favourite, and the feedback has much to do with that. It is silky smooth and feels creamy when you use it. When reaching refinement levels of 6k and above, polished bevels/edge are inevitable, and often sought after. The level of polish from this particular stone is very beautiful, assuming that you have done some refinement prior to this but it is a wonderful 8,000 grit stone.
Thank you so much for your unbelievably quick service and delivery. I placed my order online and within pretty much one day the package is waiting on my door step. My order was also filled perfectly, no mistakes. I sure know where I will be purchasing all my sharpening supplies in the future. Great business practice you have. Please never change it.

As opposed to water whetstones that require you to pre-soak the stone, the Norton oil stone is pre-filled with oil to save time and eliminate the need to pre-soak it prior to use and the lubricant stays on the surface during sharpening.  The oil also prevents metal from bonding with the abrasive surface by flushing away dislodged abrasive and metal chips.


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1000 grit is fine for a kitchen knife. Finer grits are for woodworking tools such as chisels and plane irons. Unless you’re carving oak with your filet knife, you should be good. The physics of the cut is different. After honing a kitchen knife on a stone, a butcher’s steel is used to turn a microscopic burr along the edge of the blade, which is what cuts soft stuff like meat and tomatoes. The burr wears down regularly, and taking the steel to the knife turns it again. With practice, you can actually feel and hear when the steel turns the burr. You can feel it with your finger as a slight roughness. Eventually, the knife edge rounds, and you need to re-hone it on the stones. You’ll know it’s time when the steel won’t raise a burr anymore.
Sharpening stones are graded by the size of the individual particles, or grit. In an artificial stone they are all the same. The grit falls through a sieve with a predetermined mesh size. Stones are also categorised in terms of ‘microns’. The classification can be a little confusing. Generally, a 220g stone corresponds approximately to a particle size of 60-80 microns A 1,000g stone is 15-25 microns. A 1 micron is roughly equivalent to a 10,000g finishing stone.
I give Sharp Pebble a top rating for two reasons. First, the company emailed a user guide for me to review and learn how to best use its product while it was being shipped to me. Wonderfully proactive. Second, the sharpening stone did a terrific job restoring the edge on my kitchen knives that had been woefully neglected. Ever rent a house and every knife in the kitchen has the edge of a butter knife? I was almost there. Now, the knives are cutting beautifully. I have only one suggestion for Sharp Pebble. While the stone includes a useful angle guide that can be attached to a blade and the guide gives clear steps on prepping the stone and how to hold the blade when sharpening, it does not illustrate the manner in which the blade needs to be moved across the stone. I had to go to Youtube to get some tips on the exact method. I have historically been very bad at putting an edge on a blade due to ignorance primarily. But with the help of the video and a good stone, I did an effective job. The base does a great job of holding the stone in place and is attractive in the kitchen.

While it may still feel like there is a lot to choose from, you don’t need a lot of of stones, you just a several good varieties to choose from. To summarize I will indicate below what my favourite stones are in each grit. Yes you can mix up the brands when sharpening but my recommendation is to buy a combination of 2-3 stones of the same brand and go from there.
All sharpening stones can be placed into two categories. Either natural, having been quarried from the ground, or synthetic, having been been manufactured. Before the industrial age, all sharpening stones were natural by default. Simply picking up a piece of common sandstone and stroking it along a sword blade may have been enough to produce an edge. This would at least remove some of the worst nicks and gouges produced by the clash of steel.
Diamond sharpening stones are becoming really popular because of their ability to cut fast. We tend not to recommend diamond sharpening stones/plates because a lot of damage can be done very quickly. Also diamonds are pretty sharp and at arato level they leave deep scratches in the blade that need to be polished out quite aggressively. Diamond stones can be used with and without lubricant.

Sharpening stones are graded by the size of the individual particles, or grit. In an artificial stone they are all the same. The grit falls through a sieve with a predetermined mesh size. Stones are also categorised in terms of ‘microns’. The classification can be a little confusing. Generally, a 220g stone corresponds approximately to a particle size of 60-80 microns A 1,000g stone is 15-25 microns. A 1 micron is roughly equivalent to a 10,000g finishing stone.
Sharpening stones are generally less portable than a handheld device, but stones give you more control over the angle of the blade to the sharpening stone. Sharpening systems can include a set of several different sharpening hones. Often, there are at least three stones, including a coarse stone for setting a new sharp cutting edge on very dull or damaged blades, a fine stone for general-purpose sharpening and a natural Arkansas stone for finishing and polishing the cutting edge to a razor-sharp point. Stones can be attached to a stand with a trough on the bottom for easy cleanup or they may stand alone.
I really appreciate that it comes with the rubber bases! I am beginning my own woodworking shop after graduating from woodworking school and having sharpening stones is important as a first step. These are not the highest quality stones out there, but they are great value - reasonably high quality for a good price. In addition to this 3000/8000 stone I have a 250/1000 stone from Lee Valley. Together with these I've sharpened all the plain-edged knives in the house and will soon be moving on to the chisels and plane blades after I put a hollow grind on them with the bench grinder.
We have been in the sharpening business since we opened our flagship location in Cambridge, Massachusetts in the Fall of 2012. Our standard wet-sharpening service provides a high quality edge using water cooled sharpening equipment. Our whetstone hand sharpening service was introduced during the Spring of 2015. See the details of each service below to determine the ideal option for your knives.
To use a whetstone you run the knife's blade back and forth across the stone's surface and due to the constant friction with the stone, which acts like a piece of sandpaper, the knife's edge becomes razor sharp and has a brilliant mirror shine. If you are a beginner at using a whetstone it can a take a while to master the sharpening process, so here is a video to help you with your sharpening stone skills.
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