You love your set of knives from Food Network; you use them for everything, and it is starting to show. You know it is time for a sharpening stone to be used when you try to slice a tomato and end up squashing it against the cutting board. What once was a great set of knives is now a dull safety hazard, but they can be razor sharp again. Reliable sellers on eBay offer a variety of knife sharpening stone options. You can choose from a diamond sharpening stone, a wet stone, and several other effective options. The sharpening stone is lightweight and easy to ship, so sellers offer a variety of convenient shipping items to deliver your item to you quickly. Once it arrives, read all the instructions, and carefully sharpen each knife. After the dull knives have been honed, your favorite set of knives will cut as easily as they did when you bought them, maybe even better.
In most cases a sharpening stone will be a combination of sharpening grains and a binding agent. However, in case of a Ardennes Coticule it is a completely natural product. The grains have cutting edges which enables them to sharpen your knife. As soon as a sharpening stone is used little pieces of the grains break off, revealing a new cut ing edge. The higher the number, the finer the grain. Stones with coarse grains (up to grain 400) can be used to shape the blade of a blunt knife. You can subsequently take care of the fine finish with a stone with a smaller grain.
Now move the blade – with a little pressure – in regular movements up and down along the sharpening stone. Always maintain the angle between the blade and stone. You will notice a burr become visible after five or so movements. Mentally divide the blade into three sections if the knife has a large blade. Always start with the tip and work back towards the bolster.

Of all the skills involved in chairmaking, turning sits apart. It is a separate skillset and will take time to master enough to keep pace with the other skills. It isn’t unusual for someone to make fantastic spindles and carve a lovely seat but pair them with poor looking turnings. At first, your turning skills will likely improve quickly, but then plateau as you work to master the skew and more complex shapes. I am a firm believer that chewing up a piece of wood for 20 minutes a day is more productive than spending eight hours cursing at a spinning piece. Progress is made in small increments and multiple moods, so it is important to be patient. I recall setting aside six or eight blanks in hopes of getting four decent legs and it taking the better part of a day. In time, I’ve improved my rate of success and time, which is a bit of a catch-22. I am usually just starting to really have fun when my fourth leg is done, and I have to turn off the lathe and go on to the next task. — from “Chairmaker’s Notebook” by Peter Galbert @petergalbert #Chairmakers_Notebook
The basic concept of sharpening is simple – you're using an abrasive edge to remove metal – but the knife you buy may alter the method you should use. A general rule of thumb is that a waterstone can be used for both Japanese- and Western-style blades, but you should avoid pull-through sharpeners for Japanese knives (or any knife with very brittle blades).
To summarize, Shapton Glass 500, 1,000 and 2,000 is a good combination and if you would like to throw in the 4,000 grit stone in lieu of the 2,000 that is good as well. If your knives are very hard, ZDP 189 for example, this is a fantastic choice. (They are also excellent for tools, chisels etc. and they are the premier choice for many Straight Razor honers).
Japanese whetstones (also called water stones) – both natural and synthetic – are known for their quick-working qualities, not only for Japanese blades, but also for their Western equivalents. The small particles that do the cutting are loosely bound together in the stone, and so during sharpening with the whetstone, the surface particles are quickly washed out, allowing new, sharp, particles to start working on the blade. These whetstones must be lubricated only with water! Never use oil or other lubricants!
Overall I am very satisfied with this purchase, workmanship on product is very good. I have used it on several kitchen knifes and obtained a very sharp edge. But this does take quite a bit of time and effort on each knife. I did not give the product 5 stars because it is already showing a good deal of ware but still works great, and maybe my expectations are not sound. I would recommend this sharpening stone, but you must remember, using this type of stone you will send a good deal of time on each knife.
Honing is edge refinement. Honing is the last step in sharpening but it should be the only step required when your knife, chisel or plane irons have lost their keen edge. So honing is what you do between sharpenings, meaning that in fact most of 'sharpening' is actually honing (or should be), since you can hone dozens of times between sharpenings so it is done far far more frequently.
Japanese whetstones (also called water stones) – both natural and synthetic – are known for their quick-working qualities, not only for Japanese blades, but also for their Western equivalents. The small particles that do the cutting are loosely bound together in the stone, and so during sharpening with the whetstone, the surface particles are quickly washed out, allowing new, sharp, particles to start working on the blade. These whetstones must be lubricated only with water! Never use oil or other lubricants!
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Lots of good information here. A few questions, though. Is the particle size the average or the maximum? Does anyone have any information on particle size distributions? There’s no way to get every single particle the exact same size, so the best you can hope for is a tight range of sizes. But the tighter that range, the higher the level of quality control you need (and therefore the higher the cost). For instance, I’m guessing that the cheaper sandpapers have a larger range of particle sizes for a given grit. It’s probably an academic argument, but I was curious.
Now move the blade – with a little pressure – in regular movements up and down along the sharpening stone. Always maintain the angle between the blade and stone. You will notice a burr become visible after five or so movements. Mentally divide the blade into three sections if the knife has a large blade. Always start with the tip and work back towards the bolster.

Therefore, the first step to choosing a whetstone is to determine your intended purpose and then choose your whetstone accordingly. For instance, when sharpening tools that do not require a fine edge, you should choose a relatively soft, coarse, stone such as a Norton Crystolon water stone. However, for sharpening tools that do require a fine edge, a somewhat harder Norton India oil stone would be a good choice. But, for sharpening hunting knives where an exceptionally fine edge is required, a Novaculite or Coticule oil stone would be the best but, most expensive, choice. So, the process of choosing the correct whetstone for any given purpose is to first determine how fast you would like for the stone to cut and how fine an edge you need, and then choose either a soft, coarse, stone or, a hard, fine, stone of the appropriate type and grit.
This is a good sharpening stone. However, it is not Japanese . It is made in China. The feel of the grit on the 1000 side is similar to an actual Japanese stone of 200 grit. The base is of good bamboo construction and it comes with 2 rubber nonslip perimeter protectors. You can agarpeen a knife properly with this stone but the stated grit rating may be off.
Tried many different stones with mixed success. Primary use is kitchen cutlery. This one does work as advertised although I haven't used it more than a couple times. Quickly puts on fine (and lasting) edge without much effort. I finish edge with a steel although I'm guessing that the 3000 - 8000 grit stone would be better for the "scary edge" Note: stone chips easily so treat it with care.
I bought these knives based on the reviews on the web. As you can all see, the reviews are very positive. So, I purchased these with VERY high expectations. I was reluctant based on how expensive these knives are. After using them now for several months I am blow away by the quality of these. It has changed my whole view of how important great knives make to my meal preparation. I can say without reservation that these knives are a bargain. These are a great investment in yourself and your family. Man, are these sharp! Recommend these without reservation.
A common myth is that sharpening steels actually sharpen knives, and can replace stones or other sharpening devices. Steels actually hone a knife and help keep its edge if used regularly. A steel should be used before and after each knife use for proper maintenance. Easily enough, it's used the same way you use a sharpening stone. To find the proper angle, hold the knife horizontally with the edge touching the steel. Move the spine upward to create a 45-degree angle, and then half that again for your optimal sharpening angle.
Aluminum Oxide stones range from 150 grit to 280 grit and cut aggressively but not quite so much as Silicon Carbide. The medium (240 grit) would be considered "coarse" for sharpening kitchen knives, and the fine would be considered "medium". They are considered an "oil stone" but work just fine with water, Unfortunately Norton's stones come pre-oiled so I'd scrub it well with a strong kitchen cleanser before each use until the oil is mostly gone.
It’s a decent stone, especially at this price point. I like generally like King stones. Works fast and wears fairly well. The slurry isn’t as lush and thick as I’m accustomed to but no biggie, and the upside is that I can see my work and am less likely to scratch my blade surface. It’s still aggressive and a little less slurry and pressure seems to make a finer edge on this 1k. I’m no expert but it could be that technique is just improving. Makes a nice bevel. Also, it flattens quickly and isn’t too soft. The unfortunate thing is that it is glued to a cheap hard plastic base and you can’t access both sides of stone. Nonsensical design, but would be tolerable if the base itself were slip resistant. It’s annoying when working on larger and/or heavy blades, thus the lower rating. I had no problems when honing a straight razor or pocket knife. Again, I do like the stone, and it’s inexpensive.
The DMTs are on their own scale, since they rate by "Coarse" "Fine" etc. They give micron sizes in their sales literature, so I've added a column for them. When I get home tonight I'll post up the new version that has those. New version also includes the Spyderco Sharpmaker rods, per another request, and the Trizact grading system for the 3M belts. It will also include the grit sizes for the WEPS stock plates.
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