As a professional culinarian who uses expensive knives and tools- even in my everyday life, this sharpening stone has become a “must have” in my arsenal. Whether I am restoring an older, well-worn blade back to its glory or simply keeping up with the everyday wear on my go-to knife, the 3000/8000 grit sharpening stone gives my knives the edge in the kitchen (all puns intended;)).
A new, or even experienced woodworker may be forgiven for finding the whole area of sharpening stones confusing. With so many different types available it becomes very difficult to know where to start. This buying guide will primarily examine the stones sold by Axminster. But, at the same time, will briefly explore some of the many alternative stones which the craftsperson might consider.
DICTUM is about more than just tools - For more than 160 years, DICTUM has been offering an extensive range of tools, including garden tools, materials, finishes as well as knives for the kitchen and for outdoor use that meet the highest standards and requirements. In our opinion, first-class tools are defined by haptics, ergonomics, material and manufacturing quality. That is how inspiring, durable tools are made.
Honing is edge refinement. Honing is the last step in sharpening but it should be the only step required when your knife, chisel or plane irons have lost their keen edge. So honing is what you do between sharpenings, meaning that in fact most of 'sharpening' is actually honing (or should be), since you can hone dozens of times between sharpenings so it is done far far more frequently.
Ceramic sharpening stones were the early replacement for natural stones. Unfortunately there are huge differences in the quality of ceramic stones so be wary. Some are extremely soft and dish out very quickly and at the other end of the spectrum some are so hard they tend to glaze over in a hurry. Ceramic stones need a good soaking for about 10 or more minutes to saturate the pores of the stone prior to use. As all knife steels are different we tend to find that ceramic stones tend to work better with some knives over others. There are no hard and fast rules but we like ceramic for Ao-ko and single edged knives. The Kaiden Ceramic stones are the fastest cutting Japanese stones in Australia and are recommended for advanced users.
The recent introduction of the Axminster Rider Sharpening Station utilises the Axminster Rider Double Sided Diamond Bench Stone and a top quality Connel leather strop, both set in a phenolic plastic board. There’s a ‘step like’ area at each end that’s been machined out of the phenolic surface. Each step has been engraved 25°, 30° and 45°. They’re intended to be used with the Rider Honing Guide to ensure that the correct, repeatable honing or grinding angle is achieved every time the blade is sharpened. You can watch Jason Breach take you through sharpening with the Axminster Rider Sharpening Station, along with other sharpening methods.

You’ve probably seen a number – say 1000 – on the side or top of the Whetstone you just bought and are at a loss as to what it all means, or even worse the person who sold it to you, didn’t know or forgot to mention it. Which ever of these scenarios sounds about right, you are left with a stone and no idea how you should be using it, well let me enlighten you dear reader.
✅ SUPERIOR BUNDLE : Your complete knife sharpening kit comes with Sharp Pebble Japanese Grit Whetstone 3000/8000 with a Beautiful Non-Slip Bamboo base for holding the waterstone securely during the sharpening process, a Flattening Stone used for leveling of Knife Sharpening Stone, a simple instruction manual & detailed guide (eBOOK) with lots of TIPS & TRICKS which will appeal at every skill level.

I only Just Recently Received this item. But after soaking for an hour and spending about 15 minutes with this stone and my old pocket knife i was able to turn the knife that I've had for 6 years and recently has been having some tough times cutting even the most flimsy of wet paper into a tomato slicer. I mean its not as precise as a 6000 grit would get you but it brought my knife that was gonna replace soon back into its prime. Its a little small so using it for large kitchen knives might take some getting used to but its definitely possible. 5 out of 5 for what it is. Will probably buy a larger stone next time.


I really appreciate that it comes with the rubber bases! I am beginning my own woodworking shop after graduating from woodworking school and having sharpening stones is important as a first step. These are not the highest quality stones out there, but they are great value - reasonably high quality for a good price. In addition to this 3000/8000 stone I have a 250/1000 stone from Lee Valley. Together with these I've sharpened all the plain-edged knives in the house and will soon be moving on to the chisels and plane blades after I put a hollow grind on them with the bench grinder.
In addition to some difference in apparent grit size they can vary in how well they cut, due to differences such as the grit:matrix ratio as well as in the variation of grit sizes within the stone (there is nearly always a mixture, with some or many smaller particles amongst the coarsest ones). Books going back to the 19th century mention the variability, e.g. that you might find "a quick-cutting [example]" of a finer stone.
You can actually use these stones as finishing stones in their own right however and perhaps for Western knives which typically have a cutting edge similar to a ‘U’ rather than a ‘V’ shaped edge, a #5000 grit stone may well be as far as you need to go.but if you want to go for the #6000 or #8000 super fine stones then go for it! The only bit of advice you should follow is this: If you are using your knife to cut meat, then you can happily stop at #4000 or #6000 grit. If you are only using it for vegetables or fruit go all the way to the #8000. This is because the refinement you get from a # 8000 grit stone is such that your knife edge has the potential to bend whilst cutting through muscle and sinew.So that’s Whetstone grits explained. Hopefully that gives you everything you need to know. We have a selection of whetstones on our website, spanning the whole grit range. Stones require patience to learn and skill to use, but with a little practice you will get there and it will be well worth it.
first time buying a sharping stone. i bought this because i wanted to sharpen kitchen knives. you have to practice to get good at it, use a knife you don't care about because you might mess it up. there is some conflicting instructions online on how to use, water or no water. read as much as you can about using stones and practice, practice , practice. look up videos on youtube and internet. i had fun using it, BUY IF YOU WANT TO LEARN here is some stuff i found, they all sound like professionals http://video.about.com/culinaryarts/Sharpen-Knives-With-a-Whetston.htm?rd=1 http://culinaryarts.about.com/od/knivescutlery/ht/whetstone.htm this is a video that says don't use water http://video.about.com/culinaryarts/Sharpen-Knives-With-a-Whetston.htm?rd=1 this is a youtube video that i watched that uses water. *informative http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFIg9Cm-nJg
One of the issues with water stones is that they will wear into a hollow very quickly. Although they cut rapidly and are capable of producing a super fine edge, they should be flattened every time they’re used. This can be done in a variety of ways but the best method is to use a dead flat ceramic block over which the waterstone is rubbed. Alternatively, the DMT Dia Flat Lapping Plate is guaranteed to bring a hollow water stone back to pristine condition, as shown in the video clip below:

Manufacturer contacted and sent a new one for replacement. Great customer service but replacement item was nicked on the corner. It was still usable so i didn't bother to ask for another replacement. I would recommend item to be shipped in another box instead of an over-sized yellow envelop which is not adequate protection. Item sharpen my knife pretty good though..
A sharpening stone is made of particles of abrasive material that are sintered or bonded together. The blade is moved across the stone and the steel is worn away, which creates the edge. However, at the same time, the stone is also worn away to reveal new, coarse particles. As a general rule, the softer the stone, the more rapidly it will wear and will be more aggressive in use. Harder stones don’t wear as quickly.
It is important to know that a diamond sharpening stone needs to be ‘prepared’. After all, only after sharpening a couple of knives the stone will reach its actual potential. The stone is not that great when you are looking for a mirrored blade, simply because the diamond sharpening stone cannot be made with a finer grain. However, for this task a strop will be perfect.
I really appreciate that it comes with the rubber bases! I am beginning my own woodworking shop after graduating from woodworking school and having sharpening stones is important as a first step. These are not the highest quality stones out there, but they are great value - reasonably high quality for a good price. In addition to this 3000/8000 stone I have a 250/1000 stone from Lee Valley. Together with these I've sharpened all the plain-edged knives in the house and will soon be moving on to the chisels and plane blades after I put a hollow grind on them with the bench grinder.
I am a professional violin maker (luthier) which means that I have to keep all my tools razor sharp all the time in order to work. After using a huge variety of sharpening stones, such as the full line of DMT diamond sharpening stones, the full line of Shapton glass stones, the full line of King stones, and many other various water stones and a few oil stones over the years, here is what you really need to sharpen all your tools for doing fine woodworking:
In addition to some difference in apparent grit size they can vary in how well they cut, due to differences such as the grit:matrix ratio as well as in the variation of grit sizes within the stone (there is nearly always a mixture, with some or many smaller particles amongst the coarsest ones). Books going back to the 19th century mention the variability, e.g. that you might find "a quick-cutting [example]" of a finer stone.

We're not completely sure but we think we now have the largest selection of sharpening stones on the face of the earth. If you're interested in something and don't see it here please contact us and we'll try to get it. Most of the stones you see here are Japanese water stones, both synthetic and naturals. There is also a wide selection of stone holders, flatteners, and other items that will help you get a razor sharp edge on all your sharp tools and knives.
The Juuma sharpening and honing stones offer a simplified working principle while at the same time ensuring the highest possible quality in the offered grits. Juuma Cobalt Blue stones are made of an aluminium oxide and a bonding agent. Adding cobalt serves to slow stone abrasion and increase the speed of sharpening. The speed bonus is especially marked when stoning blue steel (blue paper steel that is often used for Japanese planes and chisels). The cobalt gives the stones their blue colour. Juuma is our proprietary brand. Juuma sharpening stones are produced by a renowned Japanese whetstone manufacturer.

When the stone is intended for use on a flat surface, it is called a Bench Stone. On the other hand, small, portable, hand-held stones are referred to as Pocket Stones. Also, because Pocket Stones are smaller than Bench Stones, they are more easily transported but, they also present difficulty in maintaining a consistent angle and even pressure when attempting to sharpen longer blades. Consequently, Bench Stones are commonly used at home or in camp whereas, Pocket Stones are generally reserved for honing an edge in the field.

Every finished product you serve to your customers goes through a number of steps from growing, harvesting, and shipping to receiving, prepping, and serving. In each one of these steps, potential food safety hazards that might sicken or injure the final consumer are present. However, with careful planning, these hazards can be prevented, reduced to safe levels, or even eliminated altogether. Keep reading to learn what a HACCP plan is and the steps needed to create your own. What does HACCP Stand For? HACCP stands for Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points. It is a system restaurant operators put in place to help them identify and react to dangerous biological, chemical, or physical food contamination. The goal of this food management s


I had wanted a pair of sharpening stones for a while, so was enthused to get this last week. I watched a bunch of YouTube videos on how to use them and a deburring strop I also bought and wow, my kitchen and pocket knives are now wicked sharp. Pro tip: if you post anything about it on social media, family and friends will almost surely volunteer their knives for more practice...
The smaller the angle between the blade and stone, the sharper the knife will be, but the less side force is needed to bend the edge over or chip it off. The angle between the blade and the stone is the edge angle – the angle from the vertical to one of the knife edges, and equals the angle at which the blade is held. The total angle from one side to the other is called the included angle – on a symmetric double-ground edge (a wedge shape), the angle from one edge to the other is thus twice the edge angle. Typical edge angles are about 20° (making the included angle 40° on a double-ground edge).[1] The edge angle for very sharp knives can be as little as 10 degrees (for a 20° included angle). Knives that require a tough edge (such as those that chop) may sharpen at 25° or more.

Silicone Carbide whetstones on the other hand, are the fastest cutting of the three types of oil stones and the stones made by Norton are called Crystolon Stones. Also they too are graded as either fine, medium, or coarse stones depending on their grit. But, although these stones will not produce an edge as fine as Arkansas Oil Stones or India Oil Stones, their fast cutting ability makes them ideal for sharpening tools as well as for cutting the initial edge bevel on extremely dull knives or repairing the edge on damaged blades. Last, because they sharpen so quickly, it a common practice to start with a coarse Crystolon Oil Stone and then progress to either a medium or fine India Oil Stone and then to finish with an Arkansas Oil Stone.
And the proof is in the pudding. Try stopping at 1,000 and use the knife for awhile. If it goes dull too quickly, or doesn’t push cut to your satisfaction, then invest in a 4,000. Rinse and repeat. You can take it as far as you want. You can get an edge so sharp that the only thing it will cut without damage is air. But that’s a useless edge in the kitchen.
Before you start sharpening, soak the stone in water for around five to 10 minutes, until it absorbs the water and a liquid film appears on the surface. After soaking, splash some water on top, and re-splash during the process if it ever gets too dry. You'll get a dark, splotch of steel and stone building up on the stone while you're sharpening the blade. This is totally normal so just splash the stone with some water to clean it off and allow it to perform more efficiently. 
Once sufficiently wet, it's time to position the stone on something solid, so it doesn't move about during sharpening. Many come with holders, but you can just place it on a slightly damp tea towel on the table. The stone should be roughly perpendicular to your body, though Warner told me it is sometimes easier to angle it ever so slightly to the right (if you're right handed). 
However, it should also be noted that “water stones” are generally significantly softer than oil stones and thus, water stones generally cut faster than oil stones but, they also have to be flattened more often that oil stones do. Furthermore, it should be noted that some water stones must be soaked in water for several hours prior to use whereas, others are of the “splash and sharpen” variety and thus, they only need to be soaked for a few minutes before use and then wetted down occasionally during sharpening process. Diamond hones on the other hand are more durable than either water stones or oil stones and, because they generally have a more coarse grit, they cut faster than natural whetstones. Plus, due to their construction, they never need truing and, in fact, coarse diamond hones are often used to flatten both natural and synthetic whetstones.
Clamp-style sharpening tools use a clamp with several holes with predefined angles. The stone is mounted on a rod and is pulled through these holes, so that the angle remains consistent. Another system is the crock stick setup, where two sticks are put into a plastic or wooden base to form a V shape. When the knife is pulled up the V, the angle is held so long as the blade is held perpendicular to the base. Several cutlery manufacturers now offer electric knife sharpeners with multiple stages with at least one grinding stage. These electric sharpeners are typically used in the kitchen but have the ability to sharpen blades such as pocket or tactical knives. The main benefit of using an electric sharpener is speed with many models that can complete the sharpening process in one to two minutes. The disadvantage is that the sharpening angle is fixed so some specialized knives, like a Japanese style Santoku, may need additional attention to sharpen to the ideal angle. 
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