This stone and accessories (rubber frame for holding stone, flat grinding block) are pretty good quality. The 3000 side will remove very small nicks in kitchen knife blades, if you are patient, and the 8000 side will polish the edge for some considerable sharpness. I have another larger stone that is 1000 grit to remove more significant nicks and reshape the edge to get it ready for the 3000 stone. The quality of the 3000 stone is not quite there; as it contains some small, harder inclusions. These inclusions are white in the green matrix of the stone and could be fragments of the 8000 grit side. My larger 1000 grit stone is of the King brand, and it is higher quality and more homogeneous than this 3000 stone. Also, this stone is a bit smaller than one would ideally want for sharpening knives of 7 in or longer blade length. I would mostly recommend this stone for paring knives.
Though not strictly a sharpening method using stones, the so called ‘scary sharp’ technique has become increasingly popular in recent years. At it’s simplest, a sheet of fine 400g abrasive is stuck to a dead flat piece of float glass and the blade, usually held in a honing guide, is sharpened on the surface. From that simple idea, the system has evolved so that it’s now much easier to apply the abrasive as a whole range of very fine, self-adhesive Hermes Aluminium Oxide papers are readily available. Lubrication is still required to float away the sharpening debris and either a fine machine oil, water or even WD40 (or similar) can be used.
Any stone is composed of particles of abrasive material that are bonded, or sintered together. The blade is passed across the stone, the steel is worn away, thus creating the edge. However, at the same time, the stone is also worn away to reveal new, coarse particles. As a general rule, the softer the stone, the more rapidly it will wear and will be more aggressive in use. Harder stones don’t wear as fast. Over time, the edges of each particle within the stone tend to become slightly rounded. Particle size may be smaller, although the finished edge is very sharp, it takes much longer to hone the blade.
Modern synthetic stones are generally of equal quality to natural stones, and are often considered superior in sharpening performance due to consistency of particle size and control over the properties of the stones. For example, the proportional content of abrasive particles as opposed to base or "binder" materials can be controlled to make the stone cut faster or slower, as desired.[7] Natural stones are often prized for their natural beauty as stones and their rarity, adding value as collectors' items. Furthermore, each natural stone is different, and there are rare natural stones that contain abrasive particles in grit sizes finer than are currently available in artificial stones.[citation needed]
One of the most well-regarded natural whetstones is the yellow-gray "Belgian Coticule", which has been legendary for the edge it can give to blades since Roman times, and has been quarried for centuries from the Ardennes. The slightly coarser and more plentiful "Belgian Blue" whetstone is found naturally with the yellow coticule in adjacent strata; hence two-sided whetstones are available, with a naturally occurring seam between the yellow and blue layers. These are highly prized for their natural elegance and beauty, and for providing both a fast-cutting surface for establishing a bevel and a finer surface for refining it. This stone is considered one of the finest for sharpening straight razors.[citation needed]
Medium Grit Stones: The number range here is from 1000 to 3000, with the latter being the basic, go-to sharpening stone. If your knives have lost their edge and need a good sharpen, then this is the grit you should start with. Don’t use it too often or the knife wears down rapidly. If you like to sharpen regularly, then the 2000 and 3000 grit are the ideal choice as they are less coarse, but please remember they are designed for sharpening and not maintaining the edge.
For centuries, traditional barbers offering a wet shave used (and still do) a leather strop to produce a super fine edge on a cut throat razor and this sort of technique can be used to very good effect on plane and chisel blades. The leather is dressed with a lubricant of some sort (machine oil, petroleum jelly or similar) and then a very fine abrasive paste is rubbed into the surface. When the blade is pulled (never pushed) over the strop several times, the effect is to continuously refine an already sharp edge; precisely what the barber is hoping to achieve on his razor.
In addition, there are three broad grades of Japanese Water Stones consisting of the Ara-to (rough stone), the Naka-to (middle/medium stone) and, the Shiage-to (finishing stone). However, it should be noted that the various grades of natural Japanese Water Stones vary widely in both density and grit size from stone to stone and thus, they do not translate well to American or European abrasive standards. Furthermore, because they are significantly softer than Novaculite, Japanese Water Stones must be flattened more often and do not last as long as a either Novaculite or Coticule stones. But, because they form a slurry of fine particles when used, they also do a superior job of both cutting and polishing.
1000 grit is fine for a kitchen knife. Finer grits are for woodworking tools such as chisels and plane irons. Unless you’re carving oak with your filet knife, you should be good. The physics of the cut is different. After honing a kitchen knife on a stone, a butcher’s steel is used to turn a microscopic burr along the edge of the blade, which is what cuts soft stuff like meat and tomatoes. The burr wears down regularly, and taking the steel to the knife turns it again. With practice, you can actually feel and hear when the steel turns the burr. You can feel it with your finger as a slight roughness. Eventually, the knife edge rounds, and you need to re-hone it on the stones. You’ll know it’s time when the steel won’t raise a burr anymore.
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Grinding is generally done with some type of sharpening stone. Sharpening stones come in coarse and fine grits and can be described as hard or soft based on whether the grit comes free of the stone with use. Many sources of naturally occurring stones exist around the world; some types known to the ancient world are no longer used, due to exhaustion of former resources or the ready availability of superior alternatives. Arkansas, USA is one source for honing stones, which are traditionally used with water or honing oil. India is another traditional source for stones. Ceramic hones are also common, especially for fine grit size. Japanese water stones (both artificial and natural) come in very fine grits. Before use, they are soaked in water, then flushed with water occasionally to expose new stone material to the knife blade. The mixture of water and abraded stone and knife material is known as slurry, which can assist with the polishing of the knife edge and help sharpen the blade. Generally, these are more costly than oilstones. Coated hones, which have an abrasive, sometimes diamonds, on a base of plastic or metal, are also available.

This is a good size stone and has the two different grits needed for knife sharpening. No instructions were included, but there are many websites with written and video instructions, so this is not an issue for most people. A fair amount of dust is generated during the sharpening process, so protect the work surface and wash the knife after sharpening is completed.


I like the fact that there are two different grits (can be seen as two colors). the black rubber feet stick to the kitchen granite top like glue. The 1000 does a pretty good job of getting a knife roughly there and the 4000 puts on a fine polish for razor a sharp edge. I would go the extra step of stropping the knife after the grinding operation for an extra sharp edge.
I give Sharp Pebble a top rating for two reasons. First, the company emailed a user guide for me to review and learn how to best use its product while it was being shipped to me. Wonderfully proactive. Second, the sharpening stone did a terrific job restoring the edge on my kitchen knives that had been woefully neglected. Ever rent a house and every knife in the kitchen has the edge of a butter knife? I was almost there. Now, the knives are cutting beautifully. I have only one suggestion for Sharp Pebble. While the stone includes a useful angle guide that can be attached to a blade and the guide gives clear steps on prepping the stone and how to hold the blade when sharpening, it does not illustrate the manner in which the blade needs to be moved across the stone. I had to go to Youtube to get some tips on the exact method. I have historically been very bad at putting an edge on a blade due to ignorance primarily. But with the help of the video and a good stone, I did an effective job. The base does a great job of holding the stone in place and is attractive in the kitchen.

using an appropriate blade for the task – a thinner blade for more delicate work, and a thicker blade whenever a thinner blade is not required (e.g. a thinner blade might be used to cut fillets, butterfly steak or roast for stuffing, or perform Mukimono, while a thicker one might be used to slice or chop repeatedly, separate primal cuts of poultry or small game, or scrape and trim fat from meat or hide, as these actions would be more likely to cause unnecessary wear on a thinner blade.)


These "stones" are actually made of metal with a surface of embedded man-made diamond grit. They stay very flat, are long lasting, cut fast and are used with water as a lubricant. They can be used to flatten other stones and can be used to sharpen ceramic knives which have a mohs hardness of 8.5. Diamond has a mohs hardness of 10. The photo specimen is the fine (700 grit) stone I use to finish an edge, and instead of a steel for dressing the edge during use.

P.S. The coarse DMT stones can actually be used to keep your finer grit shapton stones flat! The DMT Lapping plate can't really be used for sharpening unlike the Extra Coarse stone, and it's a bit expensive, but consider this secondary use: It flattens the soles of old planes incredibly fast! Way better than sanding belts or sandpaper spray adhesive'd to a flat surface!
Chefs will do this every day, and there's no reason you shouldn't too. Before cooking, or after you've done the washing up, honing your knife will help keep it in good condition. "When you're using a honing steel, you're not actually removing any metal at all, just re-straightening that edge, to get it back in line," says Authbert. Remember that you'll still need to sharpen it every two or three months. 
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