We're not completely sure but we think we now have the largest selection of sharpening stones on the face of the earth. If you're interested in something and don't see it here please contact us and we'll try to get it. Most of the stones you see here are Japanese water stones, both synthetic and naturals. There is also a wide selection of stone holders, flatteners, and other items that will help you get a razor sharp edge on all your sharp tools and knives.
When sharpening a knife, you're actually grinding away the existing blade to create a new edge. This is evidenced by the fact that upon completion, you can find tiny metal filings, called swarf, when wiping down the stone. Because the metal blade is actually being ground away, a high importance is placed on the technique and consistency of drawing a knife over the stone.
Tried many different stones with mixed success. Primary use is kitchen cutlery. This one does work as advertised although I haven't used it more than a couple times. Quickly puts on fine (and lasting) edge without much effort. I finish edge with a steel although I'm guessing that the 3000 - 8000 grit stone would be better for the "scary edge" Note: stone chips easily so treat it with care.
Shapton Glass 320, 500, 1,000, 2,000 and 16,000. I have the 4,000, and 8,000, they are absolutely fine, great in fact but I just don’t use them as much as the others. These stones excel on knives made of hard steel, the hardest steel is no match for these. This does not mean you can’t sharpen hard knives on the Naniwa brand of course, you can. I have been using this particular brand of stone for many years and I absolutely love them.
Not to be a pain, but, “it depends”. With a any grit stone you will get a “tooth” on the edge of the knife. The particles in the stone do their work by sort of gouging out some of the steel. See this excellent Electron Scanning Microscope photo from Ron Hock of Hock tools. This is from an 8,000 grit stone magnified 2,000 times. A 1,000 grit stone has particles of around 15 microns and 8,000 has around 2 microns. So your 1,000 grit edge will have larger and deeper “teeth” than this photo. So are the teeth good or bad?
Cross-contamination of food can lead to serious health risks like food poisoning or unintended exposure to food allergens . If your kitchen staff members know how to prevent cross-contamination by correctly storing and preparing food, you can save the time and money that would be wasted on improperly handled food. By making the effort to separate your foods while storing and preparing them, sanitizing your kitchen surfaces and equipment, and practicing proper personal hygiene, you can create a safe and sanitary kitchen environment that is better for your customers, your employees, and your business. What is Cross-Contamination? Cross-contamination occurs when disease-causing microorganisms, like bacteria and viruses, are transferred from on
Why, then, do so many of us shy away from the task? To put it bluntly, it's because it's a rather daunting process for the beginner. Your image of knife sharpening may consist of a hyper-masculine chef slashing away violently at a steel rod (we're looking at you, Gordon). Conversely, you might have seen cooks meticulously and methodically stroking their blade up and down a Japanese waterstone with more intricate attention to detail than a Flemish landscape. 
With its premium series Select II, the whetstone manufacturer Sigma Power Corporation from Tokyo addresses users of high-alloy steels such as HSS. These stones, too, are obviously intended to engender a grinding experience similar to that of natural stones. The special production process is expensive, but the Sigma Select II probably has no equal when it comes to demolishing steel.
My favorite chef knife was not cutting it anymore (see what I did there, lol). Last time I took it to my neighbor for sharpening and he got out his bit grinder! It was overkill and left little grooves in the blade. 😣 So this time I decided to try my hand at it with a tool that was intended for the job. After a few You Tube videos, I felt comfortable enough to give it a go. It was easy peasy, and within minutes I was cutting through peppers, onions and celery, like a hot knife through butter! I appreciated the guide and the non-slip base, it gave this novice a sense of confidence. Would recommend this set.
Well, I've seen a lot of charts comparing various grit sizes in different systems out there, and at the behest of a friend on another forum, I've started somewhat of an ongoing project. None of this data is mine, it has been compiled from internet sources, and cross-checked where possible. If you spot an error, or have additional data that you would like added to the chart, let me know and I'll revise the tables and post up a new version.
1000 grit is fine for a kitchen knife. Finer grits are for woodworking tools such as chisels and plane irons. Unless you’re carving oak with your filet knife, you should be good. The physics of the cut is different. After honing a kitchen knife on a stone, a butcher’s steel is used to turn a microscopic burr along the edge of the blade, which is what cuts soft stuff like meat and tomatoes. The burr wears down regularly, and taking the steel to the knife turns it again. With practice, you can actually feel and hear when the steel turns the burr. You can feel it with your finger as a slight roughness. Eventually, the knife edge rounds, and you need to re-hone it on the stones. You’ll know it’s time when the steel won’t raise a burr anymore.
Diamond stones offer one alternative to traditional sharpening stones and provide many advantages, the principal one being that they will remain dead flat, even after sustained use. A matrix of pure, monocrystalline diamonds is permanently bonded to a dead flat, nickel plated steel substrate. These stones are available in a wide variety of different formats, for example, double sided, bench whetstones, handled mini-hones or even credit card sized diamond plates to fit conveniently in your wallet!
Something you'll also find if you decide to get a lower grit stone is that you'll want to double the grit or so to polish before going up, otherwise you'll see huge scratches. For instance, if you get a 220 stone, you'd want something to bridge between >300grit and 1000grit. A 400 grit stone might leave scratches that you'll have to spend a lot of time getting out with a 1000 grit. But when you get to the point where you consider getting a stone less than 800 grit (preferably after you get a polishing stone), you'll have a bit more experience and have done a fair amount of research to know what suits your needs.
The King 1000 Hyper Standard and King Hyper Soft 1000 are quite similar in colour. Moreover, the packaging and the labelling on both the packaging and the stone itself are virtually the same so that they are difficult to keep apart. Here are some tips on how to differentiate between the stones. In any case, it’s a good idea to mark the face of the stone with a waterproof pen.
Conveniently bundled in one affordable set for you, our Sharp Pebble Waterstone (Grit 3000/8000) with Non-Slip Bamboo base. Grit 3000 can quickly sharp the blade while Grit 8000 is used to achieve finely polished mirror finished edge. Flattening Stone is used for leveling of Sharp Pebble Grit 3000/8000 Stone And a Knife Sharpening Guide(eBook) describing how to make the most out of the product.
The composition of the stone affects the sharpness of the blade (a finer grain, usually, though not always, produces sharper blades), as does the composition of the blade (some metals take and keep an edge better than others). For example, Western kitchen knives are usually made of softer steel and take an edge angle of 20–22°, while East Asian kitchen knives are traditionally of harder steel and take an edge angle of 15–18°. The Western-style kitchen knives are generally in the range of 52–58 on the Rockwell scale, which denotes the relative hardness of a material.
Sharpening stones are graded by the size of the individual particles, or grit. In an artificial stone they are all the same. The grit falls through a sieve with a predetermined mesh size. Stones are also categorised in terms of ‘microns’. The classification can be a little confusing. Generally, a 220g stone corresponds approximately to a particle size of 60-80 microns A 1,000g stone is 15-25 microns. A 1 micron is roughly equivalent to a 10,000g finishing stone.
If you like the satisfaction of sharpening your knives yourself on a whetstone, the Shun Combination Whetstone is an excellent choice. Shun’s Combination Whetstone offers you two grits: a fine 1000-grit side and an even finer 6000-grit side. Since you won’t want to let your Shuns get too dull before sharpening, this stone is a good choice because it lets you put a keen edge on your Shun with the 1000-grit side, then polish it to perfection with the 6000-grit side. The Shun Combination Whetstone is a double-sided Japanese waterstone. You will need to thoroughly soak this whetstone before sharpening.
It is important to know that a diamond sharpening stone needs to be ‘prepared’. After all, only after sharpening a couple of knives the stone will reach its actual potential. The stone is not that great when you are looking for a mirrored blade, simply because the diamond sharpening stone cannot be made with a finer grain. However, for this task a strop will be perfect.
Very interesting. If you work flat, 45 degree is what I was taught. Love the wet stones, especially the oiled ones. The nice thing about the leather part, is the mirror finish on a razor sharp blade which is a must if doing fine wood working, carving etc. A rough blade simply does not have the fine detailed dexterity. I find that the oiled sandpaper can work great as well, but found that the refined clay bars (white refined fired clay rounds and flats etc) does a wonderful job of keeping those razor edges refined, smooth as possible and then one can high polish them for smooth cutting. Believe me, when working wood for a flute, one wants that refined edge.! Learning how to hone a blade on a flat surface teaches one to work outside without a table/wall handy too...:) But we all have to start somewhere!:) Anyway, great stuff and a great start for those who want more from their tools!:) Cheers!
✅ SUPERIOR BUNDLE : Your complete knife sharpening kit comes with Sharp Pebble Japanese Grit Whetstone 3000/8000 with a Beautiful Non-Slip Bamboo base for holding the waterstone securely during the sharpening process, a Flattening Stone used for leveling of Knife Sharpening Stone, a simple instruction manual & detailed guide (eBOOK) with lots of TIPS & TRICKS which will appeal at every skill level.
A shinkansen is a Japanese-style pull-through sharpener named after the famous bullet train. It features two sets of ceramic wheels set at the right angle for sharpening a Japanese blade, which takes out the guesswork of the waterstone. Simply hold the handle with your left hand, then saw back and forth gently through the coarser wheel to sharpen, before switching to the finer wheel to polish.
Synthetic water stones are relatively new in the West. But natural ones have been the main choice of sharpening media in the Far East for centuries, particularly in Japan. This particular type of stone consists of abrasive particles which are sintered together using a very friable clay material. In use, the clay starts to disintegrate which produces a thin, slushy surface on top of the stone which is saturated with sharp particles; new abrasive grit is continually produced as the sharpening process takes place.
When the stone is intended for use on a flat surface, it is called a Bench Stone. On the other hand, small, portable, hand-held stones are referred to as Pocket Stones. Also, because Pocket Stones are smaller than Bench Stones, they are more easily transported but, they also present difficulty in maintaining a consistent angle and even pressure when attempting to sharpen longer blades. Consequently, Bench Stones are commonly used at home or in camp whereas, Pocket Stones are generally reserved for honing an edge in the field.
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