2. Although I’ve been sharpening knives for a while, I never could get a knife sharp using the freehand method, I’ve had to rely on various jigs to set & maintain a constant angle to the bevel. To begin with, the Lanksy knife sharpener kit was my main tool, but then I found a South African jig made by Warthog Knife Sharpeners. I still have their first model, which, if memory serves me, came out in the late 1990’s. This has since been upgraded & is supplied with a diamond stone, which is worthless unless it’s going to be used for ceramic knives. However-the Warthog & the Warthog Multi-Blade’s modus operandi has the knife moving ABOVE the stone, unlike the Lanksy / Edge Pro / Edge Pro Chinese copies & variants. ( No oil / water dripping off the stone from above the knife). Also, the Warthogs use any bench-size whetstone available to its owner, a very big plus if you want to use your grand-dad’s old Arkansas stone.No tie in having to buy the manufacturer’s specialised stones which work only with one type of sharpening jig.
I had wanted a pair of sharpening stones for a while, so was enthused to get this last week. I watched a bunch of YouTube videos on how to use them and a deburring strop I also bought and wow, my kitchen and pocket knives are now wicked sharp. Pro tip: if you post anything about it on social media, family and friends will almost surely volunteer their knives for more practice...
They are now offered in a very wide range of grits from extra, extra coarse 120g – 120 micron up to extra extra fine 8,000g – 3 micron. The initial cut with diamond stones is very aggressive but this disappears after a while as the stone ‘beds’ in. Some types of stone have a pattern of circular or oval holes across the surface and this is intended to carry away the sharpening swarf more easily. A little more care should be taken with continuous diamond stones, particularly the finer grits as the surface is liable to clog more quickly. Diamond stones can be used without any lubrication, but it’s generally recommended to use either water (make sure to clean and dry it afterwards), a light machine oil or WD40.
It is important to know that a diamond sharpening stone needs to be ‘prepared’. After all, only after sharpening a couple of knives the stone will reach its actual potential. The stone is not that great when you are looking for a mirrored blade, simply because the diamond sharpening stone cannot be made with a finer grain. However, for this task a strop will be perfect.
I enjoy these stones so much that the feedback is not a deterrent at all for me, I don’t even think about it. The results are always nothing but top notch, they deliver exactly what I want, some of the sharpest knives I have ever produced were sharpened on Shapton Glass stones. They may be thinner but they last a very long time, they are easy to maintain as well,
JapaneseChefsKnife.Com (JCK, Established in 2003) is the direct internet sales division of The Kencrest Corporation. We supply a wide range of top quality Japanese Chef's knives at lower than Japanese Retail Prices direct from Seki City; the Japanese cutlery capital where fine knives are produced using over 800 years of Samurai sword-making tradition and history.
A sharpening stone is made of particles of abrasive material that are sintered or bonded together. The blade is moved across the stone and the steel is worn away, which creates the edge. However, at the same time, the stone is also worn away to reveal new, coarse particles. As a general rule, the softer the stone, the more rapidly it will wear and will be more aggressive in use. Harder stones don’t wear as quickly.
The goal when sharpening is to create a burr, which is a tiny whisper of metal left on one side of the blade. You'll know you have a burr when you can feel one smooth and one scratchy side to the edge. Warner's is formed in no time at all; I struggled. Nevertheless, eventually I got there. Once you've got the burr, it's time to move on to step three.

Very interesting. If you work flat, 45 degree is what I was taught. Love the wet stones, especially the oiled ones. The nice thing about the leather part, is the mirror finish on a razor sharp blade which is a must if doing fine wood working, carving etc. A rough blade simply does not have the fine detailed dexterity. I find that the oiled sandpaper can work great as well, but found that the refined clay bars (white refined fired clay rounds and flats etc) does a wonderful job of keeping those razor edges refined, smooth as possible and then one can high polish them for smooth cutting. Believe me, when working wood for a flute, one wants that refined edge.! Learning how to hone a blade on a flat surface teaches one to work outside without a table/wall handy too...:) But we all have to start somewhere!:) Anyway, great stuff and a great start for those who want more from their tools!:) Cheers!
In terms of feedback, in the eyes, and in the hands of many sharpeners, the feedback on this particular brand of stones is not to their liking and often it is enough to stop them from using them. These are thinner than other stones as well so you may get the impression that you are not getting your moneys worth. They are very hard stones, there is no soft, creamy sensation as you sharpen, there is not much feedback at all in fact.
Natural sharpening stones are those that are quarried from the ground as a crude slab of rock, then cut to size to adopt the familiar rectangular shape. At one time, these were the only sharpening stones available and there were many different types, most of which were in use locally in the country where they were produced. Natural stones are still available and command a premium price, for example, Arkansas stones from the USA.
Use our 1000 grit aluminum oxide water stones for achieving an ultra-fine edge on your blade. Un-mounted wet stone sharpening stones must be mounted to a “stone blank” (sold separately) to be utilized with the Edge Pro sharpening systems. Customers who go through many wet stone sharpeners can remove their worn out stones from the existing stone blank and mount their un-mounted stones themselves saving 50% off the mounted stone price. We suggest mounting the 1000 grit sharpening stones using 3M’s Super 77 adhesive spray.

For diamond-coated lapping plates ("diamond stones"), the "grits" are technically defined in terms of mesh, or number of microns between rows of the mesh. However, the "mesh" number advertised by lapping plate manufacturers such as DMT and EZE-Lap are defined to be equivalent to sandpaper grits. It's also worth noting that the manufacturing process affects how a diamond plate will perform over time. Some plates are designed so that the microscopic crystals fracture with use, exposing new, finer abrasive over time. Others are designed so the crystals remain intact. The downside to this approach is that they can be more prone to loading, requiring more frequent cleaning. Both designs are very durable and relatively low-maintenance if used properly with lubricating fluid.
Ceramic sharpening stones were the early replacement for natural stones. Unfortunately there are huge differences in the quality of ceramic stones so be wary. Some are extremely soft and dish out very quickly and at the other end of the spectrum some are so hard they tend to glaze over in a hurry. Ceramic stones need a good soaking for about 10 or more minutes to saturate the pores of the stone prior to use. As all knife steels are different we tend to find that ceramic stones tend to work better with some knives over others. There are no hard and fast rules but we like ceramic for Ao-ko and single edged knives. The Kaiden Ceramic stones are the fastest cutting Japanese stones in Australia and are recommended for advanced users.
Sharpening is a skill that is vital for chefs and cooks but often undermined by many. Even the best knives will eventually lose its cutting edge, and it is important to have a set of sharpening stones that suit your sharpening needs. For those who are still new to sharpening, read our page on "How to sharpen your knife" to learn about the fundamentals of knife sharpening and watch some videos of several different Japanese sharpening professionals, with their own personal tips.
Have you always wanted to have a razor sharp blade but don't want to spend excess amounts for a professional knife? With the help of our Professional Knife Sharpening block you can turn any blade into a razor sharp blade that can slice through anything with 100% ease like a real professional. All of this and at a fraction of the cost. Our Knife and scissors sharpener is designed to give a cost effective solution to turning your old blunt knives that you thought were destined for the bin into razor sharp high quality blades once again. All thanks to our high grade Aluminium oxide dual grit Sharpening block. So not only did we make sure that you DON’T need to buy any fancy expensive oils we made sure that all you need is some water and you are good to go. On top of that we made sure to include two grit types so not only do you get a 1000 grit side in order to prep/smooth out your knives but we then included a 6000 grit side in order to finish the honing process. Leaving you with smooth razor sharp blades than can slice through anything you want. The Non-Slip bamboo Base is there to make sure that when you are sharpening/maintaining nay blade you don’t have to worry about it slipping off the counter and potentially causing an injury. We want you to feel safe and secure with TATARA. We know that not everyone has bought a Japanese sharpening block before so with every purchase we will provide you with our free angle honing guide to help you maintain any consistent angle while honing. So in the matter of no time you will be a pro at sharpening any and all blades. With the combination of our free how to use video and Honing guide you are good to go straight out of the box. Here at TATARA we offer a 30-day Guarantee or your money back. If you don’t get sharper blades/notice a difference in the quality of your blades then we will offer you a full refund. Become a Pro Chef today and order your Chef Knife Sharpening stone today.
Just FYI; This is the #1 problem I see with most brand new kitchen knives. A blade that gets thick quickly past the cutting edge may shave hair and still be unable to produce clean cuts on food items because the thick area acts as a wedge and starts to either bind the blade or split the food like firewood rather than cutting cleanly all the way through.
×