The dual-sided whetstone is made from durable silicon carbide and has 400 grit on one side to sharpen the dullest blades and 1000 grit on the other side to create a nice smooth finish once the blade has been sharpened. The stone also forms a nice slurry that helps polish the blade for a superb shine. The stone is meant to be used with water, not oil and for best results, simply soak stone for 5-10 minutes before use, and lubricate with additional water as needed when sharpening.
The more you use the sharpening stone; the edges of each particle within the stone tend to become slightly rounded over time. When you notice that it is taking much longer to hone blades and edges, it means you need to replace the stone with a new one. Sharpening stones come with decks that make it convenient to keep the tool in balance on the stone.
In addition to some difference in apparent grit size they can vary in how well they cut, due to differences such as the grit:matrix ratio as well as in the variation of grit sizes within the stone (there is nearly always a mixture, with some or many smaller particles amongst the coarsest ones). Books going back to the 19th century mention the variability, e.g. that you might find "a quick-cutting [example]" of a finer stone.
For diamond-coated lapping plates ("diamond stones"), the "grits" are technically defined in terms of mesh, or number of microns between rows of the mesh. However, the "mesh" number advertised by lapping plate manufacturers such as DMT and EZE-Lap are defined to be equivalent to sandpaper grits. It's also worth noting that the manufacturing process affects how a diamond plate will perform over time. Some plates are designed so that the microscopic crystals fracture with use, exposing new, finer abrasive over time. Others are designed so the crystals remain intact. The downside to this approach is that they can be more prone to loading, requiring more frequent cleaning. Both designs are very durable and relatively low-maintenance if used properly with lubricating fluid.

"How do I use this daunting metal rod?" I hear you ask. Well, it's not too hard, really. The best way for a beginner is to balance the steel on a surface with the tip secured by a damp tea towel. You want to get that angle right, whether it's around 15 degrees for a Japanese knife or 20 degrees on a German or French blade. Then swipe slowly down, away from you, making sure the whole blade is honed – around five swipes on each side should do. 
Low Grit Stones: A sharpening stone with grit number less than a 1000 is generally used for knives and tools that are damaged. If your blade has any nicks or chips in the blade, the stones will take care of them in a jiffy! They usually have a coarse side for nicks and chips, with the other side for general sharpening. Even if the knife’s edge has become totally blunt, the stone will re-sharpen it perfectly.
To use a whetstone you run the knife's blade back and forth across the stone's surface and due to the constant friction with the stone, which acts like a piece of sandpaper, the knife's edge becomes razor sharp and has a brilliant mirror shine. If you are a beginner at using a whetstone it can a take a while to master the sharpening process, so here is a video to help you with your sharpening stone skills.
Shapton Glass 320, 500, 1,000, 2,000 and 16,000. I have the 4,000, and 8,000, they are absolutely fine, great in fact but I just don’t use them as much as the others. These stones excel on knives made of hard steel, the hardest steel is no match for these. This does not mean you can’t sharpen hard knives on the Naniwa brand of course, you can. I have been using this particular brand of stone for many years and I absolutely love them.
Clauss DualDrive is the first non-chuckable sharpener for Clauss DualDrive is the first non-chuckable sharpener for both #2 and carpenter pencils. Just use with your current bit on the fly. Manual or power-driven design evenly sharpens. Integrated shaving reservoir with see-through window. Features high carbon steel blades and a lifetime warranty.  More + Product Details Close
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So you are going to start at the heel and you are going to time it so that it goes all the way across. You go from one side to the other. You also want to make sure that your stone, I am not going to use as much pressure as I normally would because I cannot mount it on this showcase, you want to alternate from side to side to keep your bevel centered. Some people will take and do three times on one side and then three times on the other, the problem is that your backhand is never as good as your forehand and you end up cheating and you are going to end up with a blade that is offset. That is going to take it and thin down, you are going to get a thin bevel right on the edge. Once you get that V established, you can go from the coarser side to the finer side.


A sharpening stone is made of particles of abrasive material that are sintered or bonded together. The blade is moved across the stone and the steel is worn away, which creates the edge. However, at the same time, the stone is also worn away to reveal new, coarse particles. As a general rule, the softer the stone, the more rapidly it will wear and will be more aggressive in use. Harder stones don’t wear as quickly.
Cerax is the best-known brand of the Suehiro company. The stones sold under this name have a medium-hard bond and are particularly suitable for high-alloy tool steels but also for low-alloy carbon steels. The coarse-grained alloy constituents (e.g. chromium and vanadium) in tool steels require a stone that wears slowly. The stone with the base has extra stability and is easy to store. A Nagura stone is used for cleaning and unclogging the surface of the stone and for creating a fine polishing paste. Before use, soak the stones in water for at least 10 minutes, but do not store them in water permanently. White aluminium oxide abrasive.
Now that you're holding the handle and the blade is in position, gently apply some pressure to the belly of the blade with your left hand fingers – "roughly the amount of pressure to semi depress a sponge," says Warner. Starting at the tip, glide the blade up and down the stone – around five strokes up and down is a good number. Then move to the middle – five more strokes. Finally five strokes up and down on the heel.
Japanese water stones – both natural and synthetic – are known for their superior sharpening performance, not only for Japanese tools, but also on their Western equivalents. The loosely bonded abrasive grit is washed out very quickly, as it blunts during the sharpening process; this exposes new, sharp, particles that can get to work on the blade. Water stones are lubricated only with water! Never use oil!
Using the strength of industrial high precision superior mono-crystalline diamonds, Diamond Machining Technology (DMT) have created a durable longer-lasting flat sharpening surface that will efficiently sharpen, hone, deburr and polish almost any type of knife or cutting tool. The DMT set contains 3 one-sided whetstones that have extra-fine, fine, and coarse grits which means you have a complete sharpening system at your fingertips.
Actually, the company contacted me to make sure I received the stones and that I was happy with them. Excellent service. The stones are great! I'm pretty much a novice so the clear instructions that came with the stones and the eBook instructions were wonderful. The eBook had quality pictures demonstrating the use of the stones and the written instructions were clear and to the point. Within minutes of opening the box I had the stones figured out and sharpening my AF survival knife, my pocket knife and a couple of my wife's kitchen knives...which included a very expensive chef's knife. Very satisfied with this product and highly recommend it.
The newly designed dual-sided combination whetstone from Fallkniven features a super fine white ceramic stone (0, 1 micron) with a grit of 1400 to 2000 and the dark grey ceramic stone is made of synthetic sapphires (1 micron) and has a grit of 800-1000. There is no need to add any oil or water, just lay the blade on the stone, raise the blade's spine and deburr your blade on the grey side until it has a razor-sharp edge and then use the smooth white side to get a nice polished edge.
One thing that threw me off in the past was I bought the Veritas honing compound thinking it would be a step up from my Shapton 8000 (listed as about 1.2 micron on the chart), since the honing compound was advertised as .5 micron. Yet no matter what I did it would dull my edge immediately even though the particles were in theory smaller. From reading more on it, I think there’s two things going on:
You might not need to spend hundreds of pounds to get the best knife sharpener, but you do need to know what you're doing. Warner gave me a crash course in the technique. As a newbie to this method, it took a while to get used to (especially since Warner handed me a knife that had never previously been sharpened) but after half an hour's practice and a little encouragement, I got the hang of it. Here's what I learned...
This was the first Whetstone that I've ever purchased. After reviewing several 'how-to' videos, I jumped right in to use it. I found the process nearly meditative and the BearMoo stone extremely effective! The first knife I sharpened was very dull with small, jagged edges. The 1000 grit side effectively removed the jagged indentations and created a nice cutting edge. The 4000 grit side made the knife razor sharp. The process took nearly 40-minutes.
Simply applying light pressure is enough to sharpen on diamond sharpening stones. All you have to do is let the stone do the work for you. You can use a diamond sharpening stone when it is wet and when it is dry. The advantage of sharpening on a wet stone is that the stone is lubricated and that no sharpening residue is left behin. You should, however, remember that you need to use water and not oil. Oil can be inconvenient when sharpening and damage the surface when it isn’t properly cleaned. If you are using a dry diamond sharpening stone, we recommend that you often clean the surface of the stone. As such you remove the sharpening residue left behind keeping the stone is great condition.
Both Belgian Blue and Vielsalm Coticule are ancient stone layers found in the Belgian Ardenne Mountains with characteristics similar to both Novaculite and Siliciclastic sedimentary stone in that it is a metamorphic stone consisting of both gray and yellow volcanic ash mixed with tiny Spessartite Garnet crystals suspended in a clay matrix. However, due to its geology, both types of stone occur only in vertical seams sandwiched between two thick layers of bluish-purple slate and thus, they must be meticulously extracted mostly by hand. However, this type of extraction process is both very time-consuming and very labor-intensive and, quarrymen can only extract the stone for a few months each year due to inclement weather conditions. Consequently, both Belgium Blue and Coticule whetstones tend to be somewhat expensive.
Natural stones are quarried from deposits of a mineral called novaculite. The most available are called Arkansas Stones, and come in soft and hard grades, but Washita (coarser than soft Arkansas) and Queer Creek Blue (variable, but around hard white Arkansas) are also available. Novaculite has a mohs hardness of 6.5, equivalent to Rockwell Rc 69. Most knife blades are around 5.5 (Rc 59).

Conveniently bundled in one affordable set for you, our Sharp Pebble Waterstone (Grit 3000/8000) with Non-Slip Bamboo base. Grit 3000 can quickly sharp the blade while Grit 8000 is used to achieve finely polished mirror finished edge. Flattening Stone is used for leveling of Sharp Pebble Grit 3000/8000 Stone And a Knife Sharpening Guide(eBook) describing how to make the most out of the product.
Once you've sharpened one side, you need to flip over, but don't swap the hand gripping the blade – think of it a bit like going backhand with a tennis racket (see above). Lead with the heel this time, rather then with the blade, but repeat the process in three parts. After five strokes on each third of the blade, it's time to check your knife. It's not an exact science, and it all depends on how blunt your blade was to start with (mine was very blunt indeed). But if you sharpen fairly regularly, it should just take a few strokes. 
This was the first Whetstone that I've ever purchased. After reviewing several 'how-to' videos, I jumped right in to use it. I found the process nearly meditative and the BearMoo stone extremely effective! The first knife I sharpened was very dull with small, jagged edges. The 1000 grit side effectively removed the jagged indentations and created a nice cutting edge. The 4000 grit side made the knife razor sharp. The process took nearly 40-minutes.
1. Diamond Stones. I’ve used two, many years ago, to sharpen steel knives & found that the diamond coating wore away. They did work well at first, but then I was sharpening on the backing material. This puzzled me, because diamond is harder than steel, but have only recently read that the diamond particles are torn off the backing material because they stick to the softer steel. Diamond stones are recommended for sharpening ceramic knives only. This info about diamond stones & steel knives I got from an Edge-Pro article.
To summarize, Shapton Glass 500, 1,000 and 2,000 is a good combination and if you would like to throw in the 4,000 grit stone in lieu of the 2,000 that is good as well. If your knives are very hard, ZDP 189 for example, this is a fantastic choice. (They are also excellent for tools, chisels etc. and they are the premier choice for many Straight Razor honers).
Clauss DualDrive is the first non-chuckable sharpener for Clauss DualDrive is the first non-chuckable sharpener for both #2 and carpenter pencils. Just use with your current bit on the fly. Manual or power-driven design evenly sharpens. Integrated shaving reservoir with see-through window. Features high carbon steel blades and a lifetime warranty.  More + Product Details Close
The more you use the sharpening stone; the edges of each particle within the stone tend to become slightly rounded over time. When you notice that it is taking much longer to hone blades and edges, it means you need to replace the stone with a new one. Sharpening stones come with decks that make it convenient to keep the tool in balance on the stone.
Medium Grit Stones: The number range here is from 1000 to 3000, with the latter being the basic, go-to sharpening stone. If your knives have lost their edge and need a good sharpen, then this is the grit you should start with. Don’t use it too often or the knife wears down rapidly. If you like to sharpen regularly, then the 2000 and 3000 grit are the ideal choice as they are less coarse, but please remember they are designed for sharpening and not maintaining the edge.
The more you use the sharpening stone; the edges of each particle within the stone tend to become slightly rounded over time. When you notice that it is taking much longer to hone blades and edges, it means you need to replace the stone with a new one. Sharpening stones come with decks that make it convenient to keep the tool in balance on the stone.
You’ll know you’re reached a stopping point when you can feel the slight catch of the bevel on the edge of the blade, by carefully running your finger in the direction of the blade, or by cutting through a sheet of paper. When the knife cuts cleanly through the paper, it’s time to hone the blade. Read our guide for more information about honing vs sharpening.
I was delighted to discover, on opening my recently purchased Kanpeki knife set, single-edged blades. I had never used single-edged blades in the kitchen. I was pleasantly surprised to find each knife was so versatile. Able to do the most delicate cutting, to the workhorse of basic slicing and dicing. I am pleased to say, I will be purchasing the remaining knives and whetstone.
Ceramic sharpening stones were the early replacement for natural stones. Unfortunately there are huge differences in the quality of ceramic stones so be wary. Some are extremely soft and dish out very quickly and at the other end of the spectrum some are so hard they tend to glaze over in a hurry. Ceramic stones need a good soaking for about 10 or more minutes to saturate the pores of the stone prior to use. As all knife steels are different we tend to find that ceramic stones tend to work better with some knives over others. There are no hard and fast rules but we like ceramic for Ao-ko and single edged knives. The Kaiden Ceramic stones are the fastest cutting Japanese stones in Australia and are recommended for advanced users.
The dual-sided whetstone is made from durable silicon carbide and has 400 grit on one side to sharpen the dullest blades and 1000 grit on the other side to create a nice smooth finish once the blade has been sharpened. The stone also forms a nice slurry that helps polish the blade for a superb shine. The stone is meant to be used with water, not oil and for best results, simply soak stone for 5-10 minutes before use, and lubricate with additional water as needed when sharpening.
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A 1000 grit wet stone is going to be plenty fine enough for most knives in a ‘typical' home kitchen. Finer hones are going to be used a lot less but will be useful useful for getting a super fine edge, on a fillet knife for example. (They are essential for a professional chef because the sharper blade will leave a slightly cleaner cut for visual appeal.)
This article is not about how to sharpen a knife, check this article instead, but briefly, a coarse stone is critical, it has the potential to raise a Burr quickly and make a dull knife sharp quickly. The correct use of pressure enables us to form a burr, remove the burr and then do some coarse stone refinement and thus create a very sharp knife. This sensation is motivation, it is a confidence builder and will enhance your sharpening experience, so believe me when I say that a coarse stone is your first priority. I recommend a 400, 600 or 800 grit. After that, depending on the knives you are sharpening strive to obtain stone combination, such as a 400 – 1,000 – 5,000 grit three stone combination is going to allow you to achieve knives sharper than most people have ever seen.
You’ve probably seen a number – say 1000 – on the side or top of the Whetstone you just bought and are at a loss as to what it all means, or even worse the person who sold it to you, didn’t know or forgot to mention it. Which ever of these scenarios sounds about right, you are left with a stone and no idea how you should be using it, well let me enlighten you dear reader.
Before you start sharpening, soak the stone in water for around five to 10 minutes, until it absorbs the water and a liquid film appears on the surface. After soaking, splash some water on top, and re-splash during the process if it ever gets too dry. You'll get a dark, splotch of steel and stone building up on the stone while you're sharpening the blade. This is totally normal so just splash the stone with some water to clean it off and allow it to perform more efficiently. 
Thank you so much for your unbelievably quick service and delivery. I placed my order online and within pretty much one day the package is waiting on my door step. My order was also filled perfectly, no mistakes. I sure know where I will be purchasing all my sharpening supplies in the future. Great business practice you have. Please never change it.
Consistent, repeatable results. These stones are beautiful and will provide a lifetime of service. I got this stone along with the 500/6000/8000/16000 in order to hone straight razors and tools. Will do kitchen knives as well. These came beautifully boxed directly from japan. I suggest getting the Shapton diamond lapping plate but it's not necessary for initial flattening. These stones are immaculately flat from the factory.
Diamond stones offer one alternative to traditional sharpening stones and provide many advantages, the principal one being that they will remain dead flat, even after sustained use. A matrix of pure, monocrystalline diamonds is permanently bonded to a dead flat, nickel plated steel substrate. These stones are available in a wide variety of different formats, for example, double sided, bench whetstones, handled mini-hones or even credit card sized diamond plates to fit conveniently in your wallet!
2. Although I’ve been sharpening knives for a while, I never could get a knife sharp using the freehand method, I’ve had to rely on various jigs to set & maintain a constant angle to the bevel. To begin with, the Lanksy knife sharpener kit was my main tool, but then I found a South African jig made by Warthog Knife Sharpeners. I still have their first model, which, if memory serves me, came out in the late 1990’s. This has since been upgraded & is supplied with a diamond stone, which is worthless unless it’s going to be used for ceramic knives. However-the Warthog & the Warthog Multi-Blade’s modus operandi has the knife moving ABOVE the stone, unlike the Lanksy / Edge Pro / Edge Pro Chinese copies & variants. ( No oil / water dripping off the stone from above the knife). Also, the Warthogs use any bench-size whetstone available to its owner, a very big plus if you want to use your grand-dad’s old Arkansas stone.No tie in having to buy the manufacturer’s specialised stones which work only with one type of sharpening jig.

using an appropriate blade for the task – a thinner blade for more delicate work, and a thicker blade whenever a thinner blade is not required (e.g. a thinner blade might be used to cut fillets, butterfly steak or roast for stuffing, or perform Mukimono, while a thicker one might be used to slice or chop repeatedly, separate primal cuts of poultry or small game, or scrape and trim fat from meat or hide, as these actions would be more likely to cause unnecessary wear on a thinner blade.)


One of the combinations of stones that I was introduced to several years ago is a unique one, it is a 500, 2,000 and 16,000 grit combination. I was apprehensive when I first tried this, that was thousands of knives ago, it works, it is fantastic combination. It is unique because the traditional way of thinking is that we should be doubling the grit sizes as we sharpen, for example, a 500 grit stone should be followed by a 1,000 grit, then 2,000 grit. This line of thought is meant to be flexible, it is a general rule only, I have broken it countless times.
Sharpening stones are graded by the size of the individual particles, or grit. In an artificial stone they are all the same. The grit falls through a sieve with a predetermined mesh size. Stones are also categorised in terms of ‘microns’. The classification can be a little confusing. Generally, a 220g stone corresponds approximately to a particle size of 60-80 microns A 1,000g stone is 15-25 microns. A 1 micron is roughly equivalent to a 10,000g finishing stone.

We have been in the sharpening business since we opened our flagship location in Cambridge, Massachusetts in the Fall of 2012. Our standard wet-sharpening service provides a high quality edge using water cooled sharpening equipment. Our whetstone hand sharpening service was introduced during the Spring of 2015. See the details of each service below to determine the ideal option for your knives. 

Cerax and Suehiro stones from Suehiro are a little harder, and as such do not wear down as quickly as the classic Japanese water stones. The 8000 grit stone will perhaps give you the best cutting edge with a mirror polish on chisels and similar blades. Suehiro also makes a small combination stone for those who do not sharpen tools all that often and are reluctant to spend extra for a Cerax stone.
For someone who sharpens blades only occasionally, and knows that they will not need to grind out a chip in the edge of the blade, for instance, a combination stone will suffice. The size that one chooses depends mostly on a trade off between cost and speed. The bigger the stone, the faster one can work. The smaller stones work just as well, they just take a little more time.

Medium Grit Stones: The number range here is from 1000 to 3000, with the latter being the basic, go-to sharpening stone. If your knives have lost their edge and need a good sharpen, then this is the grit you should start with. Don’t use it too often or the knife wears down rapidly. If you like to sharpen regularly, then the 2000 and 3000 grit are the ideal choice as they are less coarse, but please remember they are designed for sharpening and not maintaining the edge.
There are three different makes of synthetic water stone currently on offer. Firstly, the general duty King stones, made by Ice Bear and available in grit sizes from 220 to 10,000g. Secondly, those manufactured by the Sigma Power Corporation in Tokyo, designed specifically to cope with sharpening high alloy steels. These ceramic stones have a very fast cutting action and will release new, aggressive particles in use. However, they will wear slightly faster. Thirdly, we have Bester, manufactured by Imanishi in Kyoto, Japan. Their particle bond is moderately strong and will  quickly cut O1, A2 and PMV-11 steel. They’ll remain flat for just as long as a slower cutting stone, with a stronger bond matrix.
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