A common myth is that sharpening steels actually sharpen knives, and can replace stones or other sharpening devices. Steels actually hone a knife and help keep its edge if used regularly. A steel should be used before and after each knife use for proper maintenance. Easily enough, it's used the same way you use a sharpening stone. To find the proper angle, hold the knife horizontally with the edge touching the steel. Move the spine upward to create a 45-degree angle, and then half that again for your optimal sharpening angle.

Now, that is super cool of you to do. I think I’ve got half a dozen different links to different types of abrasives and their equivalencies to other abrasives or their micron size, but none I’ve found have the assortment of different abrasives listed. I could get two or three windows open at once, comparing from one to another and getting more mired down in confusion all of the time. Who woulda thought that 4F pumice was courser than 1500 grit wet/dry CAMI?
After discussing the topic of grit coarseness and fineness we decided to come up with our own chart. Since one person's "fine" and one manufacturers "fine" may mean something completely different we established a 1 to 10 grit chart with 1 being the most coarse and 10 being the most fine. This allows you to better understand what each grit is used for and make a more educated buying decision.
This is our most popular knife sharpening service and the option selected for most mid to high end knife brands including Wusthof, Zwilling J.A Henckels, Global, Shun, Messermeister, Chicago Cutlery, Sabatier, Friedr. Dick, Dexter, Miyabi, Berti and many more. Our wet-sharpening service uses water cooled equipment to prevent the steel from overheating; a common problem with knife sharpening. This process is appropriate for all straight edge kitchen knives.
There are three different makes of synthetic water stone currently on offer. Firstly, the general duty King stones, made by Ice Bear and available in grit sizes from 220 to 10,000g. Secondly, those manufactured by the Sigma Power Corporation in Tokyo, designed specifically to cope with sharpening high alloy steels. These ceramic stones have a very fast cutting action and will release new, aggressive particles in use. However, they will wear slightly faster. Thirdly, we have Bester, manufactured by Imanishi in Kyoto, Japan. Their particle bond is moderately strong and will  quickly cut O1, A2 and PMV-11 steel. They’ll remain flat for just as long as a slower cutting stone, with a stronger bond matrix.
I'm not sure what the purpose of the extra white stone is - it says it is to flatten, but IMHO it is not a great idea to flatten the stones with something that small. I have a separate diamond lapping plate with a large surface area that I use to flatten the stones. It might be useful for sharpening awkward edges, like scissors and secateurs, though!
From the moment I ordered the knife set, I was emailed every step of the way till they were delivered. When I opened the box I instantly knew I made the correct decision. The weight, balance and edge were perfect. A few of my friends have handled them as well and all have asked the same question. How can I get these. I highly recommend these knives.
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