The 8,000 grit Kitayama is definitely a popular 8K stone, it is my favourite, and the feedback has much to do with that. It is silky smooth and feels creamy when you use it. When reaching refinement levels of 6k and above, polished bevels/edge are inevitable, and often sought after. The level of polish from this particular stone is very beautiful, assuming that you have done some refinement prior to this but it is a wonderful 8,000 grit stone.

Overall I am very satisfied with this purchase, workmanship on product is very good. I have used it on several kitchen knifes and obtained a very sharp edge. But this does take quite a bit of time and effort on each knife. I did not give the product 5 stars because it is already showing a good deal of ware but still works great, and maybe my expectations are not sound. I would recommend this sharpening stone, but you must remember, using this type of stone you will send a good deal of time on each knife. 

After several uses the Kamikoto is proving itself to be better than expected. As a professional I use different knives all the time and in fact have several thousand dollars worth of very fine blades of various manufacture. As it stands right now, if I could pick only one knife from all of them, I would take the Kamikoto. Fish, vegetables, raw meat, cooked meat, it handles them all very well and is a pleasure to use because of excellent balance and weight. And the edge… magnificent. Care and careful sharpening will be important, but then it always is with the finest of things. I would unhesitatingly recommend this product to people who appreciate the best. This is not a knife for fools or clumsy people. Buy, use, enjoy. And to the people at Kamikoto; “Thank You for making such a beautiful thing!”
Natural Japanese waterstones are still available, though nearly all quarries are closed. However, there still exists a large quantity of mined stone. Quarries containing the finest stones have all but been exhausted. If one were to be found, it would cost a fortune. Even so, similar, less than perfect stones that are currently produced can still fetch well in excess of €400!

When the block is intended for installation on a bench it is called a bench stone. Small, portable stones (commonly made of bonded abrasive) are called pocket stones. Being smaller, they are more portable than bench stones but present difficulty in maintaining a consistent angle and pressure when drawing the stone along larger blades. However, they still can form a good edge. Frequently, fine grained pocket stones are used for honing, especially "in the field". Despite being a homophone with wet in most dialects of modern English, whetstones do not need to be lubricated with oil or water, although it is very common to do so. Lubrication aids the cutting action and carries swarf away.
Stropping a knife is a finishing step. This is often done with a leather strap, either clean or impregnated with abrasive compounds (e.g. chromium(III) oxide or diamond), but can be done on paper, cardstock, cloth, or even bare skin in a pinch. It removes little or no metal material, but produces a very sharp edge by either straightening or very slightly reshaping the edge. Stropping may bring a somewhat sharp blade to "like new" condition.
P.S. The coarse DMT stones can actually be used to keep your finer grit shapton stones flat! The DMT Lapping plate can't really be used for sharpening unlike the Extra Coarse stone, and it's a bit expensive, but consider this secondary use: It flattens the soles of old planes incredibly fast! Way better than sanding belts or sandpaper spray adhesive'd to a flat surface!

An extremely well written and informative article on sharpening. Overtime we all get to love certain stones for our sharpening needs. I am a huge coticule fan, and although i have used all the others, i always come back to this natural stone above all others. Still trying to figure if i chose it or it chose me! NEver the less there are so many options out there it is not hard with a little time and effort to find the right combination for your needs.

The good news is that you can convert all sharpening media to microns and get a better picture of where your sharpening stone or paper is in the continuum from cinderblock (coarse) up to baby’s behind (very fine). Now I don’t want to bore you with a discussion of microns, but here’s the short explanation. A micron is a measurement of the diameter of each particle of grit in your stone and paper. Micron is sort for micrometer. One micron is one-millionth of a meter (hey, I just used the metric system). So the smaller the number in microns, the finer the grit.
Before you start sharpening, soak the stone in water for around five to 10 minutes, until it absorbs the water and a liquid film appears on the surface. After soaking, splash some water on top, and re-splash during the process if it ever gets too dry. You'll get a dark, splotch of steel and stone building up on the stone while you're sharpening the blade. This is totally normal so just splash the stone with some water to clean it off and allow it to perform more efficiently. 

Natural Japanese waterstones are still available, though nearly all quarries are closed. However, there still exists a large quantity of mined stone. Quarries containing the finest stones have all but been exhausted. If one were to be found, it would cost a fortune. Even so, similar, less than perfect stones that are currently produced can still fetch well in excess of €400!


This is an important but often confusing aspect of the sharpening process. When you sharpen knives, especially on coarser stones, you'll notice a burr form on the opposite side of the edge. It can be difficult to see, but easy to feel. Carefully feel for the burr by running your finger from the spine of the knife to the edge. The burr will jump from side to side as you sharpen each edge, and once you've felt the burr move to both sides, you can move to the next finer stone. Once you get to the finest grit, the burr will become smaller and smaller!
Stropping a knife is a finishing step. This is often done with a leather strap, either clean or impregnated with abrasive compounds (e.g. chromium(III) oxide or diamond), but can be done on paper, cardstock, cloth, or even bare skin in a pinch. It removes little or no metal material, but produces a very sharp edge by either straightening or very slightly reshaping the edge. Stropping may bring a somewhat sharp blade to "like new" condition.

Diamond hones are made from very small, industrial grade, diamonds adhered to the face of a metal or plastic plate. Also, because Diamonds are so much harder than any of the other sharpening materials, they tend to cut very fast and last much longer than the other whetstone materials. But, they are also often more expensive to purchase. In addition, Diamond Stones generally consist of three different styles consisting of a solid metal plate coated with an adhesive and diamond dust with holes in the plate to allow the swarf to escape, a solid plate without holes for sharpening tools with corners that might catch in the holes, and a plastic plate with islands of exposed plastic interspersed with the adhesive and diamond dust to act as a lubricant.


I bought these knives based on the reviews on the web. As you can all see, the reviews are very positive. So, I purchased these with VERY high expectations. I was reluctant based on how expensive these knives are. After using them now for several months I am blow away by the quality of these. It has changed my whole view of how important great knives make to my meal preparation. I can say without reservation that these knives are a bargain. These are a great investment in yourself and your family. Man, are these sharp! Recommend these without reservation.
Just FYI; This is the #1 problem I see with most brand new kitchen knives. A blade that gets thick quickly past the cutting edge may shave hair and still be unable to produce clean cuts on food items because the thick area acts as a wedge and starts to either bind the blade or split the food like firewood rather than cutting cleanly all the way through.
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