Manufacturer contacted and sent a new one for replacement. Great customer service but replacement item was nicked on the corner. It was still usable so i didn't bother to ask for another replacement. I would recommend item to be shipped in another box instead of an over-sized yellow envelop which is not adequate protection. Item sharpen my knife pretty good though..
For instance, American Novaculite (aka Washita and Arkansas Stones) is a form of metamorphic Chert that produces some of the best known and best loved natural whetstones in existence. Then, there is a form of Belgian Coticule which has been known for providing extra-keen edges since Roman times and, there is a Japanese Siliciclastic sedimentary stone (aka Japanese Water Stones) which consist of a fine silicate particles suspended in a clay matrix. Plus, there are also various types of man-made whetstones available such as Silicon Carbide (aka Crystalon) stones and Aluminum Oxide (aka India Stones) as well as a synthetic Corundum (aka Ruby) rod and Aluminum Oxide impregnated ceramic rods as well as several different types of diamond hones.
This is a good size stone and has the two different grits needed for knife sharpening. No instructions were included, but there are many websites with written and video instructions, so this is not an issue for most people. A fair amount of dust is generated during the sharpening process, so protect the work surface and wash the knife after sharpening is completed.
The smaller the angle between the blade and stone, the sharper the knife will be, but the less side force is needed to bend the edge over or chip it off. The angle between the blade and the stone is the edge angle – the angle from the vertical to one of the knife edges, and equals the angle at which the blade is held. The total angle from one side to the other is called the included angle – on a symmetric double-ground edge (a wedge shape), the angle from one edge to the other is thus twice the edge angle. Typical edge angles are about 20° (making the included angle 40° on a double-ground edge).[1] The edge angle for very sharp knives can be as little as 10 degrees (for a 20° included angle). Knives that require a tough edge (such as those that chop) may sharpen at 25° or more.
You might suspect this is an example of "You can't trust stuff on the Internet" but unfortunately it's more pervasive than that as this is also true of guides published in print, including those from the manufacturers themselves. So one has to be very careful about accepting any comparative information as definitive, although the defined grit size for any given product is more trustworthy (but not entirely reliable either).

Good hard stone on a plastic base. People pontificate about whetstones, and there is a difference between high grade and cheap-o stones. But, the more meaningful difference is practice and technique. I've seen a skilled hand put a very sharp edge on with a 600 grit. This 1000 grit is forgiving yet effective. Keep it wet, lock your wrists, and don't rush it - you'll get your knives sharper than you could with a draw-through sharpener.
Aluminum Oxide stones range from 150 grit to 280 grit and cut aggressively but not quite so much as Silicon Carbide. The medium (240 grit) would be considered "coarse" for sharpening kitchen knives, and the fine would be considered "medium". They are considered an "oil stone" but work just fine with water, Unfortunately Norton's stones come pre-oiled so I'd scrub it well with a strong kitchen cleanser before each use until the oil is mostly gone.
This is a good size stone and has the two different grits needed for knife sharpening. No instructions were included, but there are many websites with written and video instructions, so this is not an issue for most people. A fair amount of dust is generated during the sharpening process, so protect the work surface and wash the knife after sharpening is completed.
I would recommend getting a stone with a lower grit (less than 800) after you get a polishing stone, as the main uses of a lower grit stone would be to take off a lot of metal very quickly (removing chips). Its better to get a bit of experience on something a bit slower (1000 grit) and learn to hold a steady angle before diving deep into lower grits. The only time I could have used a stone lower than 800 grit (I used a 500 grit) was when I was completely changing the edge on a Kasumi (59-60HRC) knife.
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