Cross-contamination of food can lead to serious health risks like food poisoning or unintended exposure to food allergens . If your kitchen staff members know how to prevent cross-contamination by correctly storing and preparing food, you can save the time and money that would be wasted on improperly handled food. By making the effort to separate your foods while storing and preparing them, sanitizing your kitchen surfaces and equipment, and practicing proper personal hygiene, you can create a safe and sanitary kitchen environment that is better for your customers, your employees, and your business. What is Cross-Contamination? Cross-contamination occurs when disease-causing microorganisms, like bacteria and viruses, are transferred from on
We tend to recommend natural Japanese water stones only to experienced users who are thoroughly familiar with the synthetic Japanese sharpening stones. Natural stones are not to everybody’s taste and there are inevitably many uncertainties with regard to their grit grade, which cannot be determined exactly, their hardness and their suitability for certain types of steel.
Any stone is composed of particles of abrasive material that are bonded, or sintered together. The blade is passed across the stone, the steel is worn away, thus creating the edge. However, at the same time, the stone is also worn away to reveal new, coarse particles. As a general rule, the softer the stone, the more rapidly it will wear and will be more aggressive in use. Harder stones don’t wear as fast. Over time, the edges of each particle within the stone tend to become slightly rounded. Particle size may be smaller, although the finished edge is very sharp, it takes much longer to hone the blade.
Diamond hones are made from very small, industrial grade, diamonds adhered to the face of a metal or plastic plate. Also, because Diamonds are so much harder than any of the other sharpening materials, they tend to cut very fast and last much longer than the other whetstone materials. But, they are also often more expensive to purchase. In addition, Diamond Stones generally consist of three different styles consisting of a solid metal plate coated with an adhesive and diamond dust with holes in the plate to allow the swarf to escape, a solid plate without holes for sharpening tools with corners that might catch in the holes, and a plastic plate with islands of exposed plastic interspersed with the adhesive and diamond dust to act as a lubricant.
Crafted by employing methods from centuries-old traditions, the Kamikoto Toishi Sharpening Whetstone is specifically primed to hone and sharpen single bevel Japanese steel knives. The sturdy bamboo stand has been formed to hold the whetstone firmly in place during the entire sharpening process, allowing for the control necessary to form the perfect chiselled edge. The Toishi Sharpening Whetstone features two sides with different grits; the 1000 grit side is the coarser side, utilized specifically to grind away at the rougher edge produced over multiple uses of a knife. The other side consists of a finer 3000 grit for polishing and finishing the edge of a blade, the final step in a sharpening cycle.
Sharpening stones are generally less portable than a handheld device, but stones give you more control over the angle of the blade to the sharpening stone. Sharpening systems can include a set of several different sharpening hones. Often, there are at least three stones, including a coarse stone for setting a new sharp cutting edge on very dull or damaged blades, a fine stone for general-purpose sharpening and a natural Arkansas stone for finishing and polishing the cutting edge to a razor-sharp point. Stones can be attached to a stand with a trough on the bottom for easy cleanup or they may stand alone.
Once sufficiently wet, it's time to position the stone on something solid, so it doesn't move about during sharpening. Many come with holders, but you can just place it on a slightly damp tea towel on the table. The stone should be roughly perpendicular to your body, though Warner told me it is sometimes easier to angle it ever so slightly to the right (if you're right handed). 
Once you’ve decided to start sharpening your kitchen knives with a sharpening stone, you’ll need to take the necessary steps to actually get going. These steps include finding and buying the best sharpening stone for use at home, learning the basic technique involved in doing the sharpening, and then practicing enough times to get it right. (For the sake of the knives, we don’t recommend using your best kitchen knives for practice!)
Cerax and Suehiro stones from Suehiro are a little harder, and as such do not wear down as quickly as the classic Japanese water stones. The 8000 grit stone will perhaps give you the best cutting edge with a mirror polish on chisels and similar blades. Suehiro also makes a small combination stone for those who do not sharpen tools all that often and are reluctant to spend extra for a Cerax stone.
If you only have one, it would be 1000. Personally, I have one much rougher to rehab knives with chips only. I also have an 8000 stone for final polish and a strop to finish. If you only used a 1000, it would probably work 80% as well as one that was refined a bit more. Does that last bit really matter? Not much, but I find that I can cut onions without tears with a very sharp knife.
Suehiro is a smaller Japanese company which has been producing sharpening stones for three generations. Kenkichi Okumura, who founded the company, began with selling stones from his own natural stone deposit, which gained high recognition in the whole of Japan. These many years of experience in the field of natural stones enable Suehiro to successfully produce synthetic sharpening stones since 1964.
One thing that threw me off in the past was I bought the Veritas honing compound thinking it would be a step up from my Shapton 8000 (listed as about 1.2 micron on the chart), since the honing compound was advertised as .5 micron. Yet no matter what I did it would dull my edge immediately even though the particles were in theory smaller. From reading more on it, I think there’s two things going on:
Sharpal 102N 5-in-1 Knife and Hook Sharpener features Sharpal 102N 5-in-1 Knife and Hook Sharpener features pre-set crossed carbides for quick edge setting and ceramic stones for fine honing. Multi-groove sharpening stone is designed to sharpen fishhooks of various sizes. It comes with rubber over-molded body and feet for secure and comfortable grip. Moreover integrated compass built-in rust-proof ...  More + Product Details Close
LAST LONGER:- It Is Proven That If You Regularly Sharpen Your Knives They Will Stay Sharper For Longer Meaning You Won’t Need To Buy A New Knife Every Month. Our Dual Grit Sharpening Block Is Designed To Keep Your Blades Sharp And Maintained. Use The 1000 Grit In Order To Prem/smooth Out The Blade Where The 6000 Grit Is Used To Finish The Honing Of The Blade.

Sharpening stones are generally less portable than a handheld device, but stones give you more control over the angle of the blade to the sharpening stone. Sharpening systems can include a set of several different sharpening hones. Often, there are at least three stones, including a coarse stone for setting a new sharp cutting edge on very dull or damaged blades, a fine stone for general-purpose sharpening and a natural Arkansas stone for finishing and polishing the cutting edge to a razor-sharp point. Stones can be attached to a stand with a trough on the bottom for easy cleanup or they may stand alone.
I bought these knives based on the reviews on the web. As you can all see, the reviews are very positive. So, I purchased these with VERY high expectations. I was reluctant based on how expensive these knives are. After using them now for several months I am blow away by the quality of these. It has changed my whole view of how important great knives make to my meal preparation. I can say without reservation that these knives are a bargain. These are a great investment in yourself and your family. Man, are these sharp! Recommend these without reservation.
Some of the videos I watched suggested soaking the stone for 12-15 minutes prior to use. One suggested using vegetable oil on the surface versus water/soaking (I used water and presoaking it for 15-minutes). So instead of a simple 'out-of-the-box-and-use' approach, it required a bit of research before sharpening a knife. Otherwise I would have given this product a 5-star rating.
After discussing the topic of grit coarseness and fineness we decided to come up with our own chart. Since one person's "fine" and one manufacturers "fine" may mean something completely different we established a 1 to 10 grit chart with 1 being the most coarse and 10 being the most fine. This allows you to better understand what each grit is used for and make a more educated buying decision.

Both Belgian Blue and Vielsalm Coticule are ancient stone layers found in the Belgian Ardenne Mountains with characteristics similar to both Novaculite and Siliciclastic sedimentary stone in that it is a metamorphic stone consisting of both gray and yellow volcanic ash mixed with tiny Spessartite Garnet crystals suspended in a clay matrix. However, due to its geology, both types of stone occur only in vertical seams sandwiched between two thick layers of bluish-purple slate and thus, they must be meticulously extracted mostly by hand. However, this type of extraction process is both very time-consuming and very labor-intensive and, quarrymen can only extract the stone for a few months each year due to inclement weather conditions. Consequently, both Belgium Blue and Coticule whetstones tend to be somewhat expensive.
Vielsalm Coticule on the other hand generally occurs in much more narrow layers sandwiched between the slate layer and the Belgian Blue layer and thus, it is both less plentiful and more expensive than Belgian Blue stone. Also, Coticule is divided into different grades and sometimes displays blemishes on the surface due to its proximity to the slate layer. Furthermore, it is somewhat harder than Belgium Blue stone and, due to its brittleness, it is bonded to a substrate layer of hard slate prior to sale to prevent the stone from breaking during use.
As opposed to water whetstones that require you to pre-soak the stone, the Norton oil stone is pre-filled with oil to save time and eliminate the need to pre-soak it prior to use and the lubricant stays on the surface during sharpening.  The oil also prevents metal from bonding with the abrasive surface by flushing away dislodged abrasive and metal chips.
It is important to know that a diamond sharpening stone needs to be ‘prepared’. After all, only after sharpening a couple of knives the stone will reach its actual potential. The stone is not that great when you are looking for a mirrored blade, simply because the diamond sharpening stone cannot be made with a finer grain. However, for this task a strop will be perfect.
The basic concept of sharpening is simple – you're using an abrasive edge to remove metal – but the knife you buy may alter the method you should use. A general rule of thumb is that a waterstone can be used for both Japanese- and Western-style blades, but you should avoid pull-through sharpeners for Japanese knives (or any knife with very brittle blades).
Something you'll also find if you decide to get a lower grit stone is that you'll want to double the grit or so to polish before going up, otherwise you'll see huge scratches. For instance, if you get a 220 stone, you'd want something to bridge between >300grit and 1000grit. A 400 grit stone might leave scratches that you'll have to spend a lot of time getting out with a 1000 grit. But when you get to the point where you consider getting a stone less than 800 grit (preferably after you get a polishing stone), you'll have a bit more experience and have done a fair amount of research to know what suits your needs.
The smaller the angle between the blade and stone, the sharper the knife will be, but the less side force is needed to bend the edge over or chip it off. The angle between the blade and the stone is the edge angle – the angle from the vertical to one of the knife edges, and equals the angle at which the blade is held. The total angle from one side to the other is called the included angle – on a symmetric double-ground edge (a wedge shape), the angle from one edge to the other is thus twice the edge angle. Typical edge angles are about 20° (making the included angle 40° on a double-ground edge).[1] The edge angle for very sharp knives can be as little as 10 degrees (for a 20° included angle). Knives that require a tough edge (such as those that chop) may sharpen at 25° or more.
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The more you use the sharpening stone; the edges of each particle within the stone tend to become slightly rounded over time. When you notice that it is taking much longer to hone blades and edges, it means you need to replace the stone with a new one. Sharpening stones come with decks that make it convenient to keep the tool in balance on the stone.

The basic concept of sharpening is simple – you're using an abrasive edge to remove metal – but the knife you buy may alter the method you should use. A general rule of thumb is that a waterstone can be used for both Japanese- and Western-style blades, but you should avoid pull-through sharpeners for Japanese knives (or any knife with very brittle blades).

We begin our whetstone sharpening process with a 400 grit stone to shape the edge of the blade and develop a burr along the edge of the knife. Once the shape is set and we have a burr along the full length of the knife we move on to the 1000 grit stone to refine the edge and begin removing the burr, followed by the 5000 grit fine stone stone to give a beautiful sharp edge on the blade. We finish off each knife on a leather stropping block which removes the final remnants of the burr and gives a strong and lasting edge.

Simply applying light pressure is enough to sharpen on diamond sharpening stones. All you have to do is let the stone do the work for you. You can use a diamond sharpening stone when it is wet and when it is dry. The advantage of sharpening on a wet stone is that the stone is lubricated and that no sharpening residue is left behin. You should, however, remember that you need to use water and not oil. Oil can be inconvenient when sharpening and damage the surface when it isn’t properly cleaned. If you are using a dry diamond sharpening stone, we recommend that you often clean the surface of the stone. As such you remove the sharpening residue left behind keeping the stone is great condition.
You might not need to spend hundreds of pounds to get the best knife sharpener, but you do need to know what you're doing. Warner gave me a crash course in the technique. As a newbie to this method, it took a while to get used to (especially since Warner handed me a knife that had never previously been sharpened) but after half an hour's practice and a little encouragement, I got the hang of it. Here's what I learned...
I bought this wonderful knife on faith. I was told in March when it would ship. I received emails alerting me that my knife would be arriving as promised. It came early, thanks! Tthe quality and feel of the knife exceeded my wildest dreams. I lived in Tsubami ahi where knives are hand forged. This has a place amongst the best. I have it on display for now as I view it as a supreme work of art.

Our large selection of stones from many well-known manufacturers will allow connoisseurs to find the ideal stone for their needs. Because all manufacturers formulate their stones to emphasize a different mix of qualities, and because these qualities can vary widely between different stones, most woodworkers choose stones from several manufacturers to build up an optimal set of sharpening stones. Then again, once you get to know the characteristics of certain types of stone, you may find one supplier who will provide all the stones you need. Sometimes this can be an advantage. But there is no one size that fits all; each stone must fit your needs and work style.


One of the most well-regarded natural whetstones is the yellow-gray "Belgian Coticule", which has been legendary for the edge it can give to blades since Roman times, and has been quarried for centuries from the Ardennes. The slightly coarser and more plentiful "Belgian Blue" whetstone is found naturally with the yellow coticule in adjacent strata; hence two-sided whetstones are available, with a naturally occurring seam between the yellow and blue layers. These are highly prized for their natural elegance and beauty, and for providing both a fast-cutting surface for establishing a bevel and a finer surface for refining it. This stone is considered one of the finest for sharpening straight razors.[citation needed]
A blade's sharpness may be tested by checking if it "bites"—begins to cut by being drawn across an object without pressure. Specialized sticks exist to check bite, though one can also use a soft ballpoint pen, such as the common white Bic Stic. A thumbnail may be used[3] at the risk of a cut, or the edge of a sheet of paper. For kitchen knives, various vegetables may be used to check bite, notably carrots, tomatoes, or cucumbers. In testing in this way, any nicks are felt as obstacles.
Even with a badly-worn or even misshapen edge, you only need to work through at most 3 or 4 successive grits before honing. Although it's true that it's more efficient not to skip grits, it's a lot more expensive (and more hassle) to deal with a dozen or more grits than it is to work through just a few. So in practice, it doesn't make much difference whether your 600-grit stone is actually closer to 550-grit or 650-grit, because you're most likely going to skip at least a couple hundred grit every step along the way.
This article is not about how to sharpen a knife, check this article instead, but briefly, a coarse stone is critical, it has the potential to raise a Burr quickly and make a dull knife sharp quickly. The correct use of pressure enables us to form a burr, remove the burr and then do some coarse stone refinement and thus create a very sharp knife. This sensation is motivation, it is a confidence builder and will enhance your sharpening experience, so believe me when I say that a coarse stone is your first priority. I recommend a 400, 600 or 800 grit. After that, depending on the knives you are sharpening strive to obtain stone combination, such as a 400 – 1,000 – 5,000 grit three stone combination is going to allow you to achieve knives sharper than most people have ever seen.
But it's a different type of sharp, according to Joe Authbert, product development manager at ProCook. "What it does is add tiny little micro-serrations onto the edge of the blade." But fear not - your smart knife won't end up looking like a bread knife, as you'll be hard-pressed to spot the serrations. "If you looked at it under a microscope, on the cutting edge, there are these little lines that generate the sharpness, rather than a waterstone which is a smooth sharp edge," says Authbert. 
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