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This is exactly what we've needed! We have a pull-through version of a knife sharpener, but it's more for fine tuning. Our kitchen knives have seen many years of love, though, and were in desperate need of some proper attention. The stone worked magic on them. I'm very impressed with how significant the difference is. Frankly, I'm a little irritated with myself for now doing more research when I bought that pull-through one, because this stone is fantastic.
Although there are many ways to sharpen your kitchen knives, we believe that using a sharpening stone is the absolute best way to go about it. Not only will you get the best results, you won’t assume as much risk of damaging the blade as you would using a manual or electric knife sharpener. The problem for most home cooks, however, is finding the best sharpening stone and learning how to use it. I’m not going to pretend it’s as easy as purchasing a stone and digging right in.
Well, I've seen a lot of charts comparing various grit sizes in different systems out there, and at the behest of a friend on another forum, I've started somewhat of an ongoing project. None of this data is mine, it has been compiled from internet sources, and cross-checked where possible. If you spot an error, or have additional data that you would like added to the chart, let me know and I'll revise the tables and post up a new version.
For centuries, traditional barbers offering a wet shave used (and still do) a leather strop to produce a super fine edge on a cut throat razor and this sort of technique can be used to very good effect on plane and chisel blades. The leather is dressed with a lubricant of some sort (machine oil, petroleum jelly or similar) and then a very fine abrasive paste is rubbed into the surface. When the blade is pulled (never pushed) over the strop several times, the effect is to continuously refine an already sharp edge; precisely what the barber is hoping to achieve on his razor.
The most important aspect of a sharpening stone is the grit. If you have knives that have taken a beating and are either nicked up or really dull, you’ll need a courser stone to get it back into shape. And in order to put an exceptionally sharp edge on an already sharp knife, you’ll need a finer grit stone. If your knives are already in pretty good shape and just need a touch up, buying just a finer grit stone might be enough, but don’t think you can get away without a courser stone for knives that need more TLC. It is possible to buy a combination, or two-sided sharpening stone.
To use a whetstone you run the knife's blade back and forth across the stone's surface and due to the constant friction with the stone, which acts like a piece of sandpaper, the knife's edge becomes razor sharp and has a brilliant mirror shine. If you are a beginner at using a whetstone it can a take a while to master the sharpening process, so here is a video to help you with your sharpening stone skills.
One of the issues with water stones is that they will wear into a hollow very quickly. Although they cut rapidly and are capable of producing a super fine edge, they should be flattened every time they’re used. This can be done in a variety of ways but the best method is to use a dead flat ceramic block over which the waterstone is rubbed. Alternatively, the DMT Dia Flat Lapping Plate is guaranteed to bring a hollow water stone back to pristine condition, as shown in the video clip below:
Oil Stones differ from water stones in that they require the use of honing oil to float the swarf (metal particles). Also, these stones are commonly made from one of three different materials consisting of Novaculite, Aluminum Oxide (Corundum), or Silicon Carbide (Carborundum) and they all use oil to lubricate the stone and suspend the swarf in order to prevent the stone from becoming clogged. Also, while Novaculite and Coticule are the most traditional types of oil stones, there are also synthetic oil stones made by the Norton abrasives company called “India Oil Stones”.
Cross-contamination of food can lead to serious health risks like food poisoning or unintended exposure to food allergens . If your kitchen staff members know how to prevent cross-contamination by correctly storing and preparing food, you can save the time and money that would be wasted on improperly handled food. By making the effort to separate your foods while storing and preparing them, sanitizing your kitchen surfaces and equipment, and practicing proper personal hygiene, you can create a safe and sanitary kitchen environment that is better for your customers, your employees, and your business. What is Cross-Contamination? Cross-contamination occurs when disease-causing microorganisms, like bacteria and viruses, are transferred from on

The smaller the angle between the blade and stone, the sharper the knife will be, but the less side force is needed to bend the edge over or chip it off. The angle between the blade and the stone is the edge angle – the angle from the vertical to one of the knife edges, and equals the angle at which the blade is held. The total angle from one side to the other is called the included angle – on a symmetric double-ground edge (a wedge shape), the angle from one edge to the other is thus twice the edge angle. Typical edge angles are about 20° (making the included angle 40° on a double-ground edge).[1] The edge angle for very sharp knives can be as little as 10 degrees (for a 20° included angle). Knives that require a tough edge (such as those that chop) may sharpen at 25° or more.
When the stone is intended for use on a flat surface, it is called a Bench Stone. On the other hand, small, portable, hand-held stones are referred to as Pocket Stones. Also, because Pocket Stones are smaller than Bench Stones, they are more easily transported but, they also present difficulty in maintaining a consistent angle and even pressure when attempting to sharpen longer blades. Consequently, Bench Stones are commonly used at home or in camp whereas, Pocket Stones are generally reserved for honing an edge in the field.
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