Grit choices should fall in line with the steel used to make the knives you plan to sharpen. If your knives are all European, relatively soft steel knives, then you could finish off your knives at the 1,000 – 2,000 grit level. There is a lengthy explanation regarding this topic but suffice it to say that at 2,000 grit, these knives can be made extremely sharp.
I give Sharp Pebble a top rating for two reasons. First, the company emailed a user guide for me to review and learn how to best use its product while it was being shipped to me. Wonderfully proactive. Second, the sharpening stone did a terrific job restoring the edge on my kitchen knives that had been woefully neglected. Ever rent a house and every knife in the kitchen has the edge of a butter knife? I was almost there. Now, the knives are cutting beautifully. I have only one suggestion for Sharp Pebble. While the stone includes a useful angle guide that can be attached to a blade and the guide gives clear steps on prepping the stone and how to hold the blade when sharpening, it does not illustrate the manner in which the blade needs to be moved across the stone. I had to go to Youtube to get some tips on the exact method. I have historically been very bad at putting an edge on a blade due to ignorance primarily. But with the help of the video and a good stone, I did an effective job. The base does a great job of holding the stone in place and is attractive in the kitchen.

This stone and accessories (rubber frame for holding stone, flat grinding block) are pretty good quality. The 3000 side will remove very small nicks in kitchen knife blades, if you are patient, and the 8000 side will polish the edge for some considerable sharpness. I have another larger stone that is 1000 grit to remove more significant nicks and reshape the edge to get it ready for the 3000 stone. The quality of the 3000 stone is not quite there; as it contains some small, harder inclusions. These inclusions are white in the green matrix of the stone and could be fragments of the 8000 grit side. My larger 1000 grit stone is of the King brand, and it is higher quality and more homogeneous than this 3000 stone. Also, this stone is a bit smaller than one would ideally want for sharpening knives of 7 in or longer blade length. I would mostly recommend this stone for paring knives.
You shouldn’t use this stone often, as it will wear your knife down. The #2000 and #3000 grit stones can be used more often if you are the sort of person who likes to sharpen a bit more regularly as they are less coarse, but again, they are designed for sharpening and not maintaining your edge.Once you get into a routine, you will get to know how often you need to use your medium stone.
1000 grit is fine for a kitchen knife. Finer grits are for woodworking tools such as chisels and plane irons. Unless you’re carving oak with your filet knife, you should be good. The physics of the cut is different. After honing a kitchen knife on a stone, a butcher’s steel is used to turn a microscopic burr along the edge of the blade, which is what cuts soft stuff like meat and tomatoes. The burr wears down regularly, and taking the steel to the knife turns it again. With practice, you can actually feel and hear when the steel turns the burr. You can feel it with your finger as a slight roughness. Eventually, the knife edge rounds, and you need to re-hone it on the stones. You’ll know it’s time when the steel won’t raise a burr anymore.
I bought these knives based on the reviews on the web. As you can all see, the reviews are very positive. So, I purchased these with VERY high expectations. I was reluctant based on how expensive these knives are. After using them now for several months I am blow away by the quality of these. It has changed my whole view of how important great knives make to my meal preparation. I can say without reservation that these knives are a bargain. These are a great investment in yourself and your family. Man, are these sharp! Recommend these without reservation.

It depends. Meat cutters prefer this tooth because it makes their jobs easier and they are very good with a blade and know how to keep it sharp by avoiding bones, the cutting board, the table, etc... But that’s all they care about: cutting meat—which is more of a sawing action than a push or chopping cut. If you chop veggies all day, that’s a push cut and you’ll want a different edge; if you slice fruit, different edge. You get the picture.

Once the burr is removed, it's time to test the sharpness with paper. Hold a piece of newspaper at about 45°, with a bit of tension, and slash lightly with each point of the blade. If it cuts through easily, your knife's sharp. Warner speedily lacerated his newspaper, but I of course struggled. There is an element of technique involved, he reassured me. 
A well made and Versatile Chef's Knife I received this in 2 days with prime, and it arrived in perfect shape.This is a marvelous Chefs knife! I find it well balanced, and very sharp.It does require some knowledge on how to sharpen the one-sided bevel on the blade, but once you learn it's easy to maintain a razor sharp edge! I also really appreciate the wood box it comes in.The slight curve of the blade also makes it ideal to ""rock"" when finely chopping herbs. Very Pleased.
Diamond sharpening stones are becoming really popular because of their ability to cut fast. We tend not to recommend diamond sharpening stones/plates because a lot of damage can be done very quickly. Also diamonds are pretty sharp and at arato level they leave deep scratches in the blade that need to be polished out quite aggressively. Diamond stones can be used with and without lubricant.

Honing is edge refinement. Honing is the last step in sharpening but it should be the only step required when your knife, chisel or plane irons have lost their keen edge. So honing is what you do between sharpenings, meaning that in fact most of 'sharpening' is actually honing (or should be), since you can hone dozens of times between sharpenings so it is done far far more frequently.
Oilstones, like the Norton whetstone, can be made out of natural or synthetic material like Novaculite, Aluminium Oxide, or Silicon Carbide. As per the name, oilstones require the use of oil as you sharpen your knife's blade. This type of stone is slower at sharpening or honing a blade and it can be messy and you need to always have some oil on hand but it creates a nice sharp edge and a beautiful polish.
Just FYI; This is the #1 problem I see with most brand new kitchen knives. A blade that gets thick quickly past the cutting edge may shave hair and still be unable to produce clean cuts on food items because the thick area acts as a wedge and starts to either bind the blade or split the food like firewood rather than cutting cleanly all the way through.
Medium Grit Stones: The number range here is from 1000 to 3000, with the latter being the basic, go-to sharpening stone. If your knives have lost their edge and need a good sharpen, then this is the grit you should start with. Don’t use it too often or the knife wears down rapidly. If you like to sharpen regularly, then the 2000 and 3000 grit are the ideal choice as they are less coarse, but please remember they are designed for sharpening and not maintaining the edge.
It is important to know that a diamond sharpening stone needs to be ‘prepared’. After all, only after sharpening a couple of knives the stone will reach its actual potential. The stone is not that great when you are looking for a mirrored blade, simply because the diamond sharpening stone cannot be made with a finer grain. However, for this task a strop will be perfect.
This is our most popular knife sharpening service and the option selected for most mid to high end knife brands including Wusthof, Zwilling J.A Henckels, Global, Shun, Messermeister, Chicago Cutlery, Sabatier, Friedr. Dick, Dexter, Miyabi, Berti and many more. Our wet-sharpening service uses water cooled equipment to prevent the steel from overheating; a common problem with knife sharpening. This process is appropriate for all straight edge kitchen knives.
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