first time buying a sharping stone. i bought this because i wanted to sharpen kitchen knives. you have to practice to get good at it, use a knife you don't care about because you might mess it up. there is some conflicting instructions online on how to use, water or no water. read as much as you can about using stones and practice, practice , practice. look up videos on youtube and internet. i had fun using it, BUY IF YOU WANT TO LEARN here is some stuff i found, they all sound like professionals http://video.about.com/culinaryarts/Sharpen-Knives-With-a-Whetston.htm?rd=1 http://culinaryarts.about.com/od/knivescutlery/ht/whetstone.htm this is a video that says don't use water http://video.about.com/culinaryarts/Sharpen-Knives-With-a-Whetston.htm?rd=1 this is a youtube video that i watched that uses water. *informative http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFIg9Cm-nJg

These "stones" are actually made of metal with a surface of embedded man-made diamond grit. They stay very flat, are long lasting, cut fast and are used with water as a lubricant. They can be used to flatten other stones and can be used to sharpen ceramic knives which have a mohs hardness of 8.5. Diamond has a mohs hardness of 10. The photo specimen is the fine (700 grit) stone I use to finish an edge, and instead of a steel for dressing the edge during use.


Good hard stone on a plastic base. People pontificate about whetstones, and there is a difference between high grade and cheap-o stones. But, the more meaningful difference is practice and technique. I've seen a skilled hand put a very sharp edge on with a 600 grit. This 1000 grit is forgiving yet effective. Keep it wet, lock your wrists, and don't rush it - you'll get your knives sharper than you could with a draw-through sharpener.
Once you’ve decided to start sharpening your kitchen knives with a sharpening stone, you’ll need to take the necessary steps to actually get going. These steps include finding and buying the best sharpening stone for use at home, learning the basic technique involved in doing the sharpening, and then practicing enough times to get it right. (For the sake of the knives, we don’t recommend using your best kitchen knives for practice!)
The goal when sharpening is to create a burr, which is a tiny whisper of metal left on one side of the blade. You'll know you have a burr when you can feel one smooth and one scratchy side to the edge. Warner's is formed in no time at all; I struggled. Nevertheless, eventually I got there. Once you've got the burr, it's time to move on to step three.
One thing about this stone is that it is very "thirsty." I had a cup of water close by just to add a little water periodically when it felt like it was scraping a little too aggressively. Also, be sure to do as the instructions say and use different parts of the sharpening surface. I wasn't paying attention the first few minutes, and apparently I would end each sharpening pass in the exact same spot, creating a very very small notch on the edge of the stone. So I turned the stone around and made sure to vary the ending spot, and it seemed to buff out that little notch very quickly. My knife is now incredibly sharp--it seems to glide through material rather than "cut" it. I know some people would continue to go even higher with the grit, but for my purposes this whetstone is just perfect. I'll be tackling the kitchen knives next!
Cutlery is essential to the operation of every commercial kitchen, so it is important to know the best techniques for kitchen knife handling and safety. Proper knife training can help minimize the risk of personal injury and keep your kitchen running smoothly. If you are just beginning to learn or simply need to brush up on your approach, keep reading for some helpful knife safety tips. 1. A Sharp Knife Is a Safer Knife When you use a dull knife to cut, you need to apply more force. As a result, the knife is more likely to slip and increases the risk of injury. Keeping your knives sharpened is one of the easiest ways to keep them safe. Simply use a sharpening stone or knife sharpener to maintain the original precision of the blade. If your
You love your set of knives from Food Network; you use them for everything, and it is starting to show. You know it is time for a sharpening stone to be used when you try to slice a tomato and end up squashing it against the cutting board. What once was a great set of knives is now a dull safety hazard, but they can be razor sharp again. Reliable sellers on eBay offer a variety of knife sharpening stone options. You can choose from a diamond sharpening stone, a wet stone, and several other effective options. The sharpening stone is lightweight and easy to ship, so sellers offer a variety of convenient shipping items to deliver your item to you quickly. Once it arrives, read all the instructions, and carefully sharpen each knife. After the dull knives have been honed, your favorite set of knives will cut as easily as they did when you bought them, maybe even better.

When I contact the company customer support, they told me is because the way I sharpen my knives are not correct, I put too much pressure on it, so I asked them if that's true, since I am using the same method to sharpen my knives, why it won't happened to the other side (#8000) and the other stone (400/1000)? They don't even give me any answer to that question at all.

The DMTs are on their own scale, since they rate by "Coarse" "Fine" etc. They give micron sizes in their sales literature, so I've added a column for them. When I get home tonight I'll post up the new version that has those. New version also includes the Spyderco Sharpmaker rods, per another request, and the Trizact grading system for the 3M belts. It will also include the grit sizes for the WEPS stock plates.
I was delighted to discover, on opening my recently purchased Kanpeki knife set, single-edged blades. I had never used single-edged blades in the kitchen. I was pleasantly surprised to find each knife was so versatile. Able to do the most delicate cutting, to the workhorse of basic slicing and dicing. I am pleased to say, I will be purchasing the remaining knives and whetstone.
One of the combinations of stones that I was introduced to several years ago is a unique one, it is a 500, 2,000 and 16,000 grit combination. I was apprehensive when I first tried this, that was thousands of knives ago, it works, it is fantastic combination. It is unique because the traditional way of thinking is that we should be doubling the grit sizes as we sharpen, for example, a 500 grit stone should be followed by a 1,000 grit, then 2,000 grit. This line of thought is meant to be flexible, it is a general rule only, I have broken it countless times.
Conveniently bundled in one affordable set for you, our Sharp Pebble Waterstone (Grit 3000/8000) with Non-Slip Bamboo base. Grit 3000 can quickly sharp the blade while Grit 8000 is used to achieve finely polished mirror finished edge. Flattening Stone is used for leveling of Sharp Pebble Grit 3000/8000 Stone And a Knife Sharpening Guide(eBook) describing how to make the most out of the product.
With its premium series Select II, the whetstone manufacturer Sigma Power Corporation from Tokyo addresses users of high-alloy steels such as HSS. These stones, too, are obviously intended to engender a grinding experience similar to that of natural stones. The special production process is expensive, but the Sigma Select II probably has no equal when it comes to demolishing steel.
Be careful: Don’t move your fingers laterally along the edge, you’ll cut yourself. Feel for a rough area running from tip to heel. Again, it takes time to know what to expect because the best burr will be subtle. Just know that the bigger the burr, the more metal you are removing—more than necessary. Don’t worry, you won’t ruin the knife doing this. You’re learning here, and mistakes are part of the sharpening journey. Learn from them.

As you see in the pictures, it is always very important to keep same angle of about 10' to 15', which is about two coins height between the blade and the whetstone. Gently push the point you want to sharpen with your first, second and third fingers. While keeping the angle and pushing the point with your fingers, stroke the blade until it reaches the other edge of the whetstone. Then pull the blade back until it reaches the edge of the whetstone. This back and forth is counted as one stroke. Repeat it for about five strokes until you can see or feel some small burrs (edge curvatures). Then move the position of your fingers to where you have not sharpened yet, and repeat this five strokes of sharpening processed from the tip to the base of the blade.

Every finished product you serve to your customers goes through a number of steps from growing, harvesting, and shipping to receiving, prepping, and serving. In each one of these steps, potential food safety hazards that might sicken or injure the final consumer are present. However, with careful planning, these hazards can be prevented, reduced to safe levels, or even eliminated altogether. Keep reading to learn what a HACCP plan is and the steps needed to create your own. What does HACCP Stand For? HACCP stands for Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points. It is a system restaurant operators put in place to help them identify and react to dangerous biological, chemical, or physical food contamination. The goal of this food management s
Well made stone. Good quality. The flattening stone was a welcome bonus. The 3000 grit side is perfect for initial sharpening. A caution on the 8000 grit side - It is not remotely close to 8000 grit. It seemed closer to 4000 grit of a quality Japanese whetstone. I purchased a 6000 grit King S1 stone for final polishing. Stay away from the cheaper King 1000/6000 KW65 combination whetstone. That seems to use plastic binder which literally permanently clogs the 6000 grit side.
One other thing is something as a strop. Kitchen knives sometimes form a wire edge as you sharpen them. The wire edge is a thin feather of steel that stays attached to the real edge of the blade as you sharpen it. It will usually break off on the first thing you cut. Dragging the edge backwards on a small piece of leather, canvas or even cardboard can take that weak wire edge off and leave the edge sharper and stronger.
Natural stones are quarried from deposits of a mineral called novaculite. The most available are called Arkansas Stones, and come in soft and hard grades, but Washita (coarser than soft Arkansas) and Queer Creek Blue (variable, but around hard white Arkansas) are also available. Novaculite has a mohs hardness of 6.5, equivalent to Rockwell Rc 69. Most knife blades are around 5.5 (Rc 59).

Natural stones are quarried from deposits of a mineral called novaculite. The most available are called Arkansas Stones, and come in soft and hard grades, but Washita (coarser than soft Arkansas) and Queer Creek Blue (variable, but around hard white Arkansas) are also available. Novaculite has a mohs hardness of 6.5, equivalent to Rockwell Rc 69. Most knife blades are around 5.5 (Rc 59).
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