When the stone is intended for use on a flat surface, it is called a Bench Stone. On the other hand, small, portable, hand-held stones are referred to as Pocket Stones. Also, because Pocket Stones are smaller than Bench Stones, they are more easily transported but, they also present difficulty in maintaining a consistent angle and even pressure when attempting to sharpen longer blades. Consequently, Bench Stones are commonly used at home or in camp whereas, Pocket Stones are generally reserved for honing an edge in the field.
Though not strictly a sharpening method using stones, the so called ‘scary sharp’ technique has become increasingly popular in recent years. At it’s simplest, a sheet of fine 400g abrasive is stuck to a dead flat piece of float glass and the blade, usually held in a honing guide, is sharpened on the surface. From that simple idea, the system has evolved so that it’s now much easier to apply the abrasive as a whole range of very fine, self-adhesive Hermes Aluminium Oxide papers are readily available. Lubrication is still required to float away the sharpening debris and either a fine machine oil, water or even WD40 (or similar) can be used.
1000 grit is fine for a kitchen knife. Finer grits are for woodworking tools such as chisels and plane irons. Unless you’re carving oak with your filet knife, you should be good. The physics of the cut is different. After honing a kitchen knife on a stone, a butcher’s steel is used to turn a microscopic burr along the edge of the blade, which is what cuts soft stuff like meat and tomatoes. The burr wears down regularly, and taking the steel to the knife turns it again. With practice, you can actually feel and hear when the steel turns the burr. You can feel it with your finger as a slight roughness. Eventually, the knife edge rounds, and you need to re-hone it on the stones. You’ll know it’s time when the steel won’t raise a burr anymore.
The DMTs are on their own scale, since they rate by "Coarse" "Fine" etc. They give micron sizes in their sales literature, so I've added a column for them. When I get home tonight I'll post up the new version that has those. New version also includes the Spyderco Sharpmaker rods, per another request, and the Trizact grading system for the 3M belts. It will also include the grit sizes for the WEPS stock plates.
When a whetstone is used to cut metal, it acts like sandpaper by removing small particles of metal (aka “swarf”) with each pass of the blade over the stone. Therefore, whetstones with more coarse grits cut faster than those with finer grits and, at the same time, soft whetstones cut faster than hard whetstones because each pass of the blade over both types of whetstones not only removes fine particles of metal from the blade, it also removes fine particles from the surface of the whetstone (aka “slurry”) which continuously exposes new cutting crystals. However, if the swarf is allowed to build up on the surface of the whetstone during sharpening, it will clog the stone and drastically diminish its effectiveness. Therefore, some whetstones require water to lubricate the stone and suspend the swarf whereas, other whetstones require oil to lubricate the stone and suspend the swarf.

I would recommend getting a stone with a lower grit (less than 800) after you get a polishing stone, as the main uses of a lower grit stone would be to take off a lot of metal very quickly (removing chips). Its better to get a bit of experience on something a bit slower (1000 grit) and learn to hold a steady angle before diving deep into lower grits. The only time I could have used a stone lower than 800 grit (I used a 500 grit) was when I was completely changing the edge on a Kasumi (59-60HRC) knife.
Therefore, the first step to choosing a whetstone is to determine your intended purpose and then choose your whetstone accordingly. For instance, when sharpening tools that do not require a fine edge, you should choose a relatively soft, coarse, stone such as a Norton Crystolon water stone. However, for sharpening tools that do require a fine edge, a somewhat harder Norton India oil stone would be a good choice. But, for sharpening hunting knives where an exceptionally fine edge is required, a Novaculite or Coticule oil stone would be the best but, most expensive, choice. So, the process of choosing the correct whetstone for any given purpose is to first determine how fast you would like for the stone to cut and how fine an edge you need, and then choose either a soft, coarse, stone or, a hard, fine, stone of the appropriate type and grit.
A blade's sharpness may be tested by checking if it "bites"—begins to cut by being drawn across an object without pressure. Specialized sticks exist to check bite, though one can also use a soft ballpoint pen, such as the common white Bic Stic. A thumbnail may be used[3] at the risk of a cut, or the edge of a sheet of paper. For kitchen knives, various vegetables may be used to check bite, notably carrots, tomatoes, or cucumbers. In testing in this way, any nicks are felt as obstacles.

If you only have one, it would be 1000. Personally, I have one much rougher to rehab knives with chips only. I also have an 8000 stone for final polish and a strop to finish. If you only used a 1000, it would probably work 80% as well as one that was refined a bit more. Does that last bit really matter? Not much, but I find that I can cut onions without tears with a very sharp knife.

Sharpening stones are graded by the size of the individual particles, or grit. In an artificial stone they are all the same. The grit falls through a sieve with a predetermined mesh size. Stones are also categorised in terms of ‘microns’. The classification can be a little confusing. Generally, a 220g stone corresponds approximately to a particle size of 60-80 microns A 1,000g stone is 15-25 microns. A 1 micron is roughly equivalent to a 10,000g finishing stone.
Beginning on the right side of the knife, move from tip to heel and heel to tip, then flip the knife and repeat. For the left side, it’s opposite—start at the top of the stone to reach the heel area completely. So, you will move from heel to tip and then tip to heel. Remember to apply and release pressure as you did earlier, exactly the same as in Step 2, but with light, refining pressure.

Cutlery is essential to the operation of every commercial kitchen, so it is important to know the best techniques for kitchen knife handling and safety. Proper knife training can help minimize the risk of personal injury and keep your kitchen running smoothly. If you are just beginning to learn or simply need to brush up on your approach, keep reading for some helpful knife safety tips. 1. A Sharp Knife Is a Safer Knife When you use a dull knife to cut, you need to apply more force. As a result, the knife is more likely to slip and increases the risk of injury. Keeping your knives sharpened is one of the easiest ways to keep them safe. Simply use a sharpening stone or knife sharpener to maintain the original precision of the blade. If your
This is our most popular knife sharpening service and the option selected for most mid to high end knife brands including Wusthof, Zwilling J.A Henckels, Global, Shun, Messermeister, Chicago Cutlery, Sabatier, Friedr. Dick, Dexter, Miyabi, Berti and many more. Our wet-sharpening service uses water cooled equipment to prevent the steel from overheating; a common problem with knife sharpening. This process is appropriate for all straight edge kitchen knives.
Be careful: Don’t move your fingers laterally along the edge, you’ll cut yourself. Feel for a rough area running from tip to heel. Again, it takes time to know what to expect because the best burr will be subtle. Just know that the bigger the burr, the more metal you are removing—more than necessary. Don’t worry, you won’t ruin the knife doing this. You’re learning here, and mistakes are part of the sharpening journey. Learn from them.
Clamp-style sharpening tools use a clamp with several holes with predefined angles. The stone is mounted on a rod and is pulled through these holes, so that the angle remains consistent. Another system is the crock stick setup, where two sticks are put into a plastic or wooden base to form a V shape. When the knife is pulled up the V, the angle is held so long as the blade is held perpendicular to the base. Several cutlery manufacturers now offer electric knife sharpeners with multiple stages with at least one grinding stage. These electric sharpeners are typically used in the kitchen but have the ability to sharpen blades such as pocket or tactical knives. The main benefit of using an electric sharpener is speed with many models that can complete the sharpening process in one to two minutes. The disadvantage is that the sharpening angle is fixed so some specialized knives, like a Japanese style Santoku, may need additional attention to sharpen to the ideal angle.
Visually, a very sharp knife has an edge that is too small to see with the eye; it may even be hard or impossible to focus in a microscope. The shape near the edge can be highlighted by rotating the knife and watching changes in reflection. Nicks and rolled edges can also be seen, as the rolled edge provides a reflective surface, while a properly straightened edge will be invisible when viewed head-on.

Before you start sharpening, soak the stone in water for around five to 10 minutes, until it absorbs the water and a liquid film appears on the surface. After soaking, splash some water on top, and re-splash during the process if it ever gets too dry. You'll get a dark, splotch of steel and stone building up on the stone while you're sharpening the blade. This is totally normal so just splash the stone with some water to clean it off and allow it to perform more efficiently. 

They are now offered in a very wide range of grits from extra, extra coarse 120g – 120 micron up to extra extra fine 8,000g – 3 micron. The initial cut with diamond stones is very aggressive but this disappears after a while as the stone ‘beds’ in. Some types of stone have a pattern of circular or oval holes across the surface and this is intended to carry away the sharpening swarf more easily. A little more care should be taken with continuous diamond stones, particularly the finer grits as the surface is liable to clog more quickly. Diamond stones can be used without any lubrication, but it’s generally recommended to use either water (make sure to clean and dry it afterwards), a light machine oil or WD40.


Well, I've seen a lot of charts comparing various grit sizes in different systems out there, and at the behest of a friend on another forum, I've started somewhat of an ongoing project. None of this data is mine, it has been compiled from internet sources, and cross-checked where possible. If you spot an error, or have additional data that you would like added to the chart, let me know and I'll revise the tables and post up a new version.

Cross-contamination of food can lead to serious health risks like food poisoning or unintended exposure to food allergens . If your kitchen staff members know how to prevent cross-contamination by correctly storing and preparing food, you can save the time and money that would be wasted on improperly handled food. By making the effort to separate your foods while storing and preparing them, sanitizing your kitchen surfaces and equipment, and practicing proper personal hygiene, you can create a safe and sanitary kitchen environment that is better for your customers, your employees, and your business. What is Cross-Contamination? Cross-contamination occurs when disease-causing microorganisms, like bacteria and viruses, are transferred from on

The Shapton GlassStone HR Series of Ceramic Waterstones is Shapton's most advanced stones for sharpening hard steels and modern steel alloys. They are one of the highest quality stones available at any price. The Shapton GlassStone is a high quality ceramic waterstone that uses uniform ceramic abrasives to provide a consistent and fast cut. The stones are backed with glass (hence the name GlassStone) to provide an exceptionally flat base.


Sharpening stones are graded by the size of the individual particles, or grit. In an artificial stone they are all the same. The grit falls through a sieve with a predetermined mesh size. Stones are also categorised in terms of ‘microns’. The classification can be a little confusing. Generally, a 220g stone corresponds approximately to a particle size of 60-80 microns A 1,000g stone is 15-25 microns. A 1 micron is roughly equivalent to a 10,000g finishing stone.

These "stones" are actually made of metal with a surface of embedded man-made diamond grit. They stay very flat, are long lasting, cut fast and are used with water as a lubricant. They can be used to flatten other stones and can be used to sharpen ceramic knives which have a mohs hardness of 8.5. Diamond has a mohs hardness of 10. The photo specimen is the fine (700 grit) stone I use to finish an edge, and instead of a steel for dressing the edge during use.
NOTES: It is impossible to make exact comparisons between all the different abrasives because different standards are used for average, minimum and maximum size, the percentage allowed outside those limits, and the distribution of sizes within those limits.  Sizes of 240 grit and larger (macrogrits) are determined by sieving, while sizes of 240 grit and smaller (microgrits) are determined by sedimentation. Both ANSI standards have a 240 grit.  European "P" sizes are for coated abrasives; "F" sizes are for bonded abrasives.
Meanwhile, if you want something that you can use to sharpen a variety of knives and edges, including small and pointed tools, you might want to consider the DMT WM8CX-WB 8-Inch Duo Sharp Plus Bench Stone – Coarse/Extra Coarse with Base. For less than a hundred bucks, you can even use it to repair a damaged edge because of its extra-coarse diamonds.
Natural sharpening stones are those that are quarried from the ground as a crude slab of rock, then cut to size to adopt the familiar rectangular shape. At one time, these were the only sharpening stones available and there were many different types, most of which were in use locally in the country where they were produced. Natural stones are still available and command a premium price, for example, Arkansas stones from the USA.

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