Keep your knife razor-sharp with a high-quality sharpening stone. We offer a wide variety of sharpening stones, such as Arkansas stone, Diamond stone, Bench stone, Water stone and more. Whether you own a pocket knife, a hunting knife or a kitchen knife, a sharpening stone is essential for preventing your blade from becoming dull.  Most of our sharpening stones are lightweight and portable, so you can use them at home or take them with you wherever you go.
The humble sharpener tends to elicit more divergent opinions than just about any other type of kitchen tech. Everyone, it turns out, has their own take on which type of sharpener works best and why and most serious chefs aren’t shy about voicing their opinion. As you can imagine then there are a number of things most chefs – both professional and amateur – look for in a sharpener in order to ensure they get the one that’s right for them. These considerations include:
When starting out sharpening, it won’t be long before you hear about the “toothy” vs “polished” edge. It will suffice to know that a 1k stone is going to give you an edge that will perform beautifully as will a knife finished at 5k. There is a belief that a knife that has a highly polished finish, 5k and up will be so polished that it’s toothy goodness will be erased. This knife will not bite into the skin of a tomato for example because the edge is too polished, it will slide over the top. This is not always true, if the knife has been sharpened well, i.e. if Side A and Side B of the blade meet precisely at the Apex of the knife, that edge will slide into a tomato quite beautifully. I have seen many brand new Japanese knives with highly polished 8k edges that no tomato skin can stand up to.
Method 3: Use a Sharpening Stone. This is the best method by far. Not only will it give you the best edge, it also removes the least amount of material. With a fine enough grit, your knife should be able to take hairs off your arm when you've finished. Additionally—and I'm not kidding about the importance of this one—the act of sharpening your knife will help you create a much stronger bond with your blade, and a knife that is treated respectfully will behave much better for its owner. The only problem? It takes a little know-how.

Aesthetics – While it’s true that most people keep their sharpener, (even their expensive mechanical sharpeners) in the drawer until it’s time to use them you’ll still want to be aware of whether your sharpener fits into the overall aesthetic of your kitchen when you do take it out to use. While sharpener designs are fairly limited to be sure you typically have some control over the color and finish of the device as well as design factors like whether the device is boxy or rounded in appearance. With a stone sharpener or a stick however you pretty much get what you get.
★ MOST COMPLETE SET ON AMAZON – Our Sharpening Set is the only kit that comes with both a Flattening Stone and Angle Guide in addition to a Bonus E-Book (for sharpening tips and tricks) and Detailed Instruction Guide. Providing amazing value at a lower price than other sets. A Flattening Stone is a MUST have since all whetstones eventually become uneven and need to be flattened. This set completely eliminates the need to buy one later.
To answer an obvious question: The difference between 15 degrees and 12 degrees is so slight that a 15-degree sharpener is fine for both kinds of bevels. So if a dedicated 15-degree sharpener is all you need (that is, if you own only Asian or post-2011 European knives), we have good news: Chef’sChoice makes the otherwise identical Pronto 463, which contains a single Asian-style sharpening slot. (For the testers at Cook’s Illustrated, the Pronto 463 is the top choice among manual sharpeners.) And if you own older European knives exclusively, the company sells a dedicated 20-degree model, the Pronto 464.
Guided sharpening systems use a holder where you secure your knife, one or several sharpening sticks or conductors. Through the use of the holder, it is easy to select the right angle for sharpening. When using a guided sharpening system, there are two ways to sharpen your knife: a. Sharpening sticks are placed in the holder, after which you pull the knife along the different sharpening sticks, in order to sharpen it. b. The knife is secured in the holder, after which you pull the sharpening sticks along the blade. There are various systems for sale with a sharpening stone grinding the knife under a adjustable angle. The advantage is that you have a nice straight cutting edge. Disadvantage of this method is that it takes more time than grinding on a regular sharpening stone. Moreover, by sharpening with a fixed angle, you are much less flexible. So if you don't want to sharpen the knife in ze pre-fixed angle, you will still have to do it manually. The guided sharpening systems are highly recommendable for sharpening expensive pocket knives, because they provide a very nice cutting edge. By pasting the blade with adhesive tape, you can prevent any scratches caused by the clamping system. For kitchen knives, it is advisable to use a sharpening stone or electric grinder.
A nearly foolproof manual sharpener that looks like modern art, the angle that the knife is inserted into the sharpener determines how aggressive the sharpening is (yes, there is a correct angle for sharpening your knives). You can start by sharpening the knife then hone it to a fine finish in the same slot. If the knife doesn’t need sharpening, you can use this for honing only. This sharpener self-adjusts, and sharpens the knife edge to its original angle, so you don’t need to know the edge angle to sharpen the knife correctly, and there’s nothing to adjust. The tungsten carbide sharpeners will last a long time, but can be replaced when necessary.
The Juuma sharpening and honing stones offer a simplified working principle while at the same time ensuring the highest possible quality in the offered grits. Juuma Cobalt Blue stones are made of an aluminium oxide and a bonding agent. Adding cobalt serves to slow stone abrasion and increase the speed of sharpening. The speed bonus is especially marked when stoning blue steel (blue paper steel that is often used for Japanese planes and chisels). The cobalt gives the stones their blue colour. Juuma is our proprietary brand. Juuma sharpening stones are produced by a renowned Japanese whetstone manufacturer.
A honing rod (also known as a honing steel, knife steel, or sharpening steel) is also highly recommended. These are not sharpeners, although they are often thought of that way. Rather, a honing rod helps keep a blade’s edge keen between sharpenings by straightening out the tiny dings and dents caused by everyday slicing and chopping. Honing is a simple and fast process—it takes just a few seconds—and it can extend the life of a sharp edge for weeks or even months. Eventually, however, the edge gets rounded over and dull; then it’s time for a complete resharpening.
Sharp knives make the culinary world go round but finding the best knife sharpener isn’t as simple as walking into the store (do people still walk into stores?) and grabbing the first sharpener that presents itself. There are different types of electric sharpeners, some that are straightforward and some whose sharpening process involves as many as 3 or 4 stages. If you’re looking to keep things simple by using a sharpening stone well, there are 3 different types of them as well – oil, water and diamond – and they each have their pros and cons. So it can be confusing.
Stones are divided into hard oilstones (often called Arkansas stones), which use mineral oil or kerosene as a lubricant, and soft (often called Japanese) waterstones, which use water as a lubricant. Whereas the hard oilstones rely on directly abrading the knife steel, the soft waterstones wear away rapidly as you sharpen, producing an abrasive slurry that cuts the new edge; they work more quickly, but you have to regularly reflatten them by rubbing them against a sheet of glass. With both kinds, you have to set and maintain the sharpening angle using only your eyes and hands, and any sloppiness can quickly produce a rounded edge that will hardly cut butter. Doing it right is not all that hard once you get the knack, but there’s a difficult initial learning curve. You also need at least two stones, coarse and fine, to do a proper job—and good stones aren’t cheap. And both oilstones and waterstones make a bit of a mess in use and take a lot more time to set a new edge than the sharpening tools we recommend here—10 to 20 minutes versus three minutes or less.

Oil stones have been around a long time, and while not as popular as in the past, they are still a practical option. Not as fast as the other stones, they are easy to use and their lower price makes them a good value for the budget conscious. With oil stones, the relation of the types and grits can be confusing. Our article, Difference in Sharpening Stone Materials, provides a more in depth explanation, but in general an India stone or two combined with an Arkansas stone is a good combination to start with.
Every finished product you serve to your customers goes through a number of steps from growing, harvesting, and shipping to receiving, prepping, and serving. In each one of these steps, potential food safety hazards that might sicken or injure the final consumer are present. However, with careful planning, these hazards can be prevented, reduced to safe levels, or even eliminated altogether. Keep reading to learn what a HACCP plan is and the steps needed to create your own. What does HACCP Stand For? HACCP stands for Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points. It is a system restaurant operators put in place to help them identify and react to dangerous biological, chemical, or physical food contamination. The goal of this food management s
One of the only things we don’t like about the Idahone is the lack of a prominent finger guard where the rod meets the handle. As a result, we highly recommend using the safer “supported” technique for honing a knife, as demonstrated in our guide to chef’s knives. In this method, the rod is held against the counter or cutting board, and blade always moves away from your body and grip-hand, greatly reducing the chance of a nasty accident.
This is a mail-order service. After placing your order online, simply package your knives and mail them directly to Precision Knife Sharpening. Upon receipt, skilled craftsmen will sharpen your kitchen and sport knives to the perfect angle and mail them back to you typically within one business day. You will receive email communications throughout the process informing you of the status of your order. (Note: Customers in the Washington, DC area may drop off their knives in person.)
The DuoSharp Plus stones are nicely sized at 8” long by 2 5/8” wide and have two grits on each stone to maximize value. The Plus in the name refers to an area of continuous grit in the otherwise interrupted grit surface of the stone. This area is for sharpening edges with fine points that might be difficult on the interrupted surface. A coarse/fine DuoSharp Plus stone is a good single stone to start a sharpening toolkit.
The humble sharpener tends to elicit more divergent opinions than just about any other type of kitchen tech. Everyone, it turns out, has their own take on which type of sharpener works best and why and most serious chefs aren’t shy about voicing their opinion. As you can imagine then there are a number of things most chefs – both professional and amateur – look for in a sharpener in order to ensure they get the one that’s right for them. These considerations include:

After testing nine honing rods, both steel and ceramic, we think the Idahone 12″ fine ceramic rod is best for most kitchens. We were looking for a tool that kept knives of all styles sharp, from 4-inch paring knives to 12-inch chef’s knives. We wanted one that worked equally well on German and Japanese blades, which are made of softer and harder steels, respectively. We also wanted to pay less than $40. The Idahone met all our requirements. Its surface was noticeably smoother than that of the other three ceramic models we tried, yet rapidly restored the edges of all the knives we tested. It also removed less material from the blades, which will help to prolong their working lives. And compared with the five steel honing rods we tested, the Idahone was gentler on the blades.
I give it 4 stars because of what it requires to actually sharpen your blade. It requires a setup, soak prep your stones, and there's different settings to adjust for your blade. This isn't just a simple whetstone you drag your knife across and it's occasionally sharp enough to shave with. That being said, the build quality is very nice, and smooth. I've sharpened 3 of my most used kitchen knives after not but a few hours out of the box, already. My knives are even sharper than when they came out of the box, and the edges are beautiful and even. Once you get the little learning curve down and a nice method, it's easy, and your knives will slice through a tomato sideways, without having to hold said tomato, or doing the paper test, you don't need to drag the knife, it literally just drops through the paper. I took a layer of my fingernail off and barely felt it, from being excited, so watch your fingers!!. The price is a bit steep, but the end results are amazing if done correctly, and repeatable a few months down the road if you do a lot of chopping!
The dual-sided whetstone is made from durable silicon carbide and has 400 grit on one side to sharpen the dullest blades and 1000 grit on the other side to create a nice smooth finish once the blade has been sharpened. The stone also forms a nice slurry that helps polish the blade for a superb shine. The stone is meant to be used with water, not oil and for best results, simply soak stone for 5-10 minutes before use, and lubricate with additional water as needed when sharpening.

At Yoshihiro we offer 3 different grades of stones that run the gamut from coarse to fine and are essential tools for proper knife care. A #1000 grit “Arato” stone is best used for repairing damaged and very dull knives. The stone is abrasive which takes off a lot of material for refashioning a dull edge. A #3000 grit “Nakato Shiage” stone is best used for creating a sharp polished edge. This stone is necessary to maintain the blade's edge and is recommended for routine sharpening. An #8000 grit “Shiage” Fine Finishing stone is best used for creating an even more refined and honed edge.


Different knives are sharpened differently according to grind (edge geometry) and application. For example, surgical scalpels are extremely sharp but fragile, and are generally disposed of, rather than sharpened, after use. Straight razors used for shaving must cut with minimal pressure, and thus must be very sharp with a small angle and often a hollow grind. Typically these are stropped daily or more often. Kitchen knives are less sharp, and generally cut by slicing rather than just pressing, and are steeled daily. At the other extreme, an axe for chopping wood will be less sharp still, and is primarily used to split wood by chopping, not by slicing, and may be reground but will not be sharpened daily. In general, but not always, the harder the material to be cut, the higher (duller) the angle of the edge.
The basic concept of sharpening is simple – you're using an abrasive edge to remove metal – but the knife you buy may alter the method you should use. A general rule of thumb is that a waterstone can be used for both Japanese- and Western-style blades, but you should avoid pull-through sharpeners for Japanese knives (or any knife with very brittle blades).

Method 2: Send it out to a professional. This is a good option, provided you have a good knife sharpener living nearby, and are willing to pay to have the services performed. If you plan to sharpen your blades a dozen or so times a year, as I do, this can get quite expensive. All but the best professionals also use a grinding stone that, again, will take away much more material than is necessary from your blade, reducing its lifespan. Want to forge a stronger relationship with your blade? Then you'll want to...
All Yoshihiro knives are handcrafted by Artisans with a lineage spanning centuries. The origins of the techniques used to create Yoshihiro knives dates back to medieval Japanese sword smiths who perfected the technique of handling fire, iron, and water. Our selections are far and wide and is a culmination of seven centuries of tradition intertwining with modern innovation inspired from Japanese ingenuity.
We tend to recommend natural Japanese water stones only to experienced users who are thoroughly familiar with the synthetic Japanese sharpening stones. Natural stones are not to everybody’s taste and there are inevitably many uncertainties with regard to their grit grade, which cannot be determined exactly, their hardness and their suitability for certain types of steel.
A major benefit of sharpening your knives on a sharpening stone is that you can thin out your knife. When thinning out a knife, you grind away extra material on the sides of the blade, making the blade thinner. Thinning of a knife is useful for knives that are often sharpened, as the cutting edge gets fatter when the blade is sharpened more often. Thinning is of great importance for the preservation of good cutting properties.

This knife sharpener has three sharpening slots with three different cutting materials: tungsten carbide, ceramic, and diamond. The diamond slot is used for ceramic knives, while the other two slots for sharpening and honing steel knives. This can also sharpen serrated knives. This sharpener is easy to use and has a handle that keeps your hand safely away from the knife blade.


By combining the best in high tech steels with an elegant traditional cutlery style and Old World sword making techniques, Kasumi knives continues Seki City Japan's tradition of fine cutlery with its line of Damascus-clad blades. Combining strength, beauty, and function Kasumi has achieved harmony in kitchen cutlery, creating stunning collectors' items as well as knives that surpass all else. The Kasumi knives' base blades are crafted of V-Gold No. 10 (VG-10) high carbon stainless steel that has been developed especially for knives. The blades are hardened to Rockwell C59-60 and therefore maintain a sharper edge longer than other cutlery line. A fine damascus stainless steel lies on both sides of the main VG-10 core, adding incredible beauty and strength to the blades. The intriguing Damascus pattern results from the repeated folding and forging of fine stainless steel into 32 multiple layers. As with the fantastic creations of Japan's past, each knife is carefully hand-finished throughout each step of the manufacturing process by the most skilled craftsmen. The beauty of the Kasumi Damascus pattern coupled with the strong laminated black wooden handles make these knives look and perform gracefully in any style of cooking.
Stropping a knife is a finishing step. This is often done with a leather strap, either clean or impregnated with abrasive compounds (e.g. chromium(III) oxide or diamond), but can be done on paper, cardstock, cloth, or even bare skin in a pinch. It removes little or no metal material, but produces a very sharp edge by either straightening or very slightly reshaping the edge. Stropping may bring a somewhat sharp blade to "like new" condition.
I've always wanted to sharpen knives on water stones, and this set gave me the motivation to finally give it a shot. The price is amazing for the quality and content of the set. It comes with all the grits you need to sharpen anything... I usually start on the 400 grit if the knife is very dull, or directly on the 1000 grit if it's not too dull. The 3000 and 8000 grit stones are softer and ideal after the coarser stones. The online learning section is truly amazing, much better than I expected. A convenient place with instructional videos and many articles about knife sharpening. Only downside is that the knives are now so sharp I need to be very careful using them... but that's a good thing! I feel like I fell in love with knife sharpening again.
In recent years, some whetstone manufacturers have started producing ceramic whetstones made from hard, ceramic, powders that are mixed with Aluminum Oxide and then sintered to form a solid. But, rather than using oil or water to lubricate the whetstone, ceramic whetstones are meant to be used without lubrication and thus, they provide a significant advantage for chefs who need to keep their knives sharp but, who do not have either the room or time for using a bench water stone. Thus, they are commonly available as either bench stones, pocket stones, round rods, or triangular rods.
As you continue to repeat strokes on the first time, eventually a tiny burr will form on the other side of the blade. To check for it, place the blade on your thumb, and pull it backwards. If the burr has formed, it should catch slightly on your thumb (with really fine grit stones, say 2000 or above, you won't feel this). This may take up to 30 or 40 strokes, and is the indication that you should switch and start sharpening the other side.
The best knives require special care and consideration. The steel of a knife from Yoshihiro Cutlery was forged with careful attention by master craftsman heated and quenched through many laborious steps. The final product being a steel that is of the appropriate hardness with enough elasticity for inner structural integrity. A key component of knife care is knife sharpening.
DICTUM is about more than just tools - For more than 160 years, DICTUM has been offering an extensive range of tools, including garden tools, materials, finishes as well as knives for the kitchen and for outdoor use that meet the highest standards and requirements. In our opinion, first-class tools are defined by haptics, ergonomics, material and manufacturing quality. That is how inspiring, durable tools are made.
Whichever method you choose, be it a waterstone (also known as a whetstone), or a pull-through (either V-shaped or ceramic wheels) it's important to regularly hone your knife with a honing steel, which we'll also cover below. You'll be pleased to hear that you won't have to reach for the stones too regularly – once every two or three months should suffice. 
When you apply a sharp knife to the surface of a tomato, cucumber, carrot or other food item it should - if you are holding it firmly and applying minimal pressure - sink into the particular item without effort. As such all you really need to work on is your technique and making sure you keep your fingers out of the way. With a dull knife however things aren’t quite so simple. When you apply a dull blade to, say, a tomato it’s not going to slice into the skin. Instead the skin will be able to push back meaning you’ll need to apply ever more pressure to get the knife to penetrate. Increasing the pressure on the knife increases the likelihood of the knife slipping off the offending food item to one side or another. And if it slips to the side where your hand is attempting to hold the vegetable steady you could be in store for a very nasty cut. Because even a dull knife will cause injury if there’s enough force behind it.
A nearly foolproof manual sharpener that looks like modern art, the angle that the knife is inserted into the sharpener determines how aggressive the sharpening is (yes, there is a correct angle for sharpening your knives). You can start by sharpening the knife then hone it to a fine finish in the same slot. If the knife doesn’t need sharpening, you can use this for honing only. This sharpener self-adjusts, and sharpens the knife edge to its original angle, so you don’t need to know the edge angle to sharpen the knife correctly, and there’s nothing to adjust. The tungsten carbide sharpeners will last a long time, but can be replaced when necessary.
✅ SAFETY : We understand the importance of safety when dealing with sharpening tools, your purchase comes with Silicone base for holding the stone inside Non Slip Bamboo base, this setup will ensure the stone is FIXED IN ONE PLACE while sharpening. And knife sharpening angle guide allows you to maintain CORRECT ANGLE and safely apply consistent pressure while sharpening the blade.
If you wish, further polish or even strop the edge to the desired sharpness. This makes the edge better suited for "push cutting" (cutting directly into materials, pushing straight down without sliding the blade across the object) but generally impairs slicing ability: without the "microscopic serrations" left by grinding with a stone, the blade tends to not bite into things like tomato skins.

Its main disadvantage is cost: At about $120, the flagship stainless steel Professional model sits in an uncomfortable middle ground between our main pick and our upgrade pick. That said, an otherwise identical Classic model made of black plastic is generally closer to the price of our main pick. A lesser point, but an important one, is that this design is not completely foolproof, as our other picks are. You have to pay attention and use a steady hand and pressure to get a straight edge. Not hard—but you may need a little practice to master the process.

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