Manufacturer contacted and sent a new one for replacement. Great customer service but replacement item was nicked on the corner. It was still usable so i didn't bother to ask for another replacement. I would recommend item to be shipped in another box instead of an over-sized yellow envelop which is not adequate protection. Item sharpen my knife pretty good though..
Finally, once you've refreshed the edge on your knife, you need to hone the edge to make it true. What happens when you grind a new edge onto your knife is that the extreme edge of the blade becomes microscopically thin. That is why it's sharp. But being so thin means that it is easily bent to one side or the other, causing the knife to seem dull. It isn't dull, it's what's called out of true.
Oilstones, like the Norton whetstone, can be made out of natural or synthetic material like Novaculite, Aluminium Oxide, or Silicon Carbide. As per the name, oilstones require the use of oil as you sharpen your knife's blade. This type of stone is slower at sharpening or honing a blade and it can be messy and you need to always have some oil on hand but it creates a nice sharp edge and a beautiful polish.
One of the only things we don’t like about the Idahone is the lack of a prominent finger guard where the rod meets the handle. As a result, we highly recommend using the safer “supported” technique for honing a knife, as demonstrated in our guide to chef’s knives. In this method, the rod is held against the counter or cutting board, and blade always moves away from your body and grip-hand, greatly reducing the chance of a nasty accident.

After 15 hours of research and testing, and several adult lifetimes of kitchen experience, we recommend the manual Chef’sChoice ProntoPro 4643 as the best mechanical knife sharpener. It’s impressively simple—almost intuitive—to use: You run the blade back and forth between its diamond-impregnated sharpening wheels to cut and then hone a new edge. The ProntoPro 4643 works on both traditional European and Japanese knives, which use different edge angles, making it universally utilitarian. (Note that we also link to otherwise equivalent but cheaper single-angle sharpeners below.)
The sharpener has come a long way in the past couple of thousand years and yet it hasn’t. That is, while there have been incredible advances in the development of mechanical knife sharpeners the classic and very ancient sharpening stone is still with us and very much in use as you read this. The best knife sharpener for you will be one that meets the needs of your cuisine and your temperament but which, first and foremost, reliably produces the sharp knives (look after your knife!) you need with the least hassle.
Diamond-coated sharpening devices remain permanently plane, and are especially suitable for tools with straight blades as well as for producing plane surfaces (e.g. backs of plane and chisel blades, plane soles, scrapers). Also suitable for carbide coated cutters, tool steels, HSS as well as non-metal materials (glass, ceramic etc.). We recommend moistening diamond-coated sharpening devices with water and grinding with little pressure.
The material is very good for my purpose, and I would have given this a 5 star,but as you can see one is off the base and two are cracked in addition to being off their bases. I won't low ball this rating because I happened to have gorilla glue and clamps at the shop, and the extra effort is fine by me. I would highly recommend to the manufacturer that they choose a stronger apoxy for their products and review their packaging methods.
Start with a #1000 grit stone.Divide the knife into 3 sections (tip, middle, heel). With the edge of the knife facing away, place the Shinogi flat against the stone. Firmly push the blade to the edge (Red arrow). Next, pull the blade back to where you started without applying pressure (Blue arrow). Repeat until a rough edge (burr) is felt on the opposite side of the blade. Continue through to the other sections. (See image #1)
Just to prove that we're not merely sharpening geeks, here's an interesting side note. The word whet pops up in some unexpected places. A small species of owl is called the saw-whet owl because the sound it makes reminded people of the sound made when sharpening a saw with a file. And the phrase "to whet your appetite" comes from the idea of your hunger growing sharper at the thought of food.
Using the strength of industrial high precision superior mono-crystalline diamonds, Diamond Machining Technology (DMT) have created a durable longer-lasting flat sharpening surface that will efficiently sharpen, hone, deburr and polish almost any type of knife or cutting tool. The DMT set contains 3 one-sided whetstones that have extra-fine, fine, and coarse grits which means you have a complete sharpening system at your fingertips.

When starting out sharpening, it won’t be long before you hear about the “toothy” vs “polished” edge. It will suffice to know that a 1k stone is going to give you an edge that will perform beautifully as will a knife finished at 5k. There is a belief that a knife that has a highly polished finish, 5k and up will be so polished that it’s toothy goodness will be erased. This knife will not bite into the skin of a tomato for example because the edge is too polished, it will slide over the top. This is not always true, if the knife has been sharpened well, i.e. if Side A and Side B of the blade meet precisely at the Apex of the knife, that edge will slide into a tomato quite beautifully. I have seen many brand new Japanese knives with highly polished 8k edges that no tomato skin can stand up to.

I am completely satisfied with the quality and value of this product. I have been able to get my kitchen knives "scary sharp". I can slice ripe tomatos almost paper thin with very little pressure. Thank you for the prompt delivery as well. I haven't tried the blade guide yet but I am sure it would work satisfactorily as it has rollers on either side and may even prolong the life of the stone and having to use the flattening stone as often.

Once you get the hang of the sharpener, it works great. I used an digital angle gauge (I'm a woodworker) to set for type of knife. After a few passes each way, moved to next stone and got all blades nice and sharp in very little time. One slight issue is the cleaning of the stones. I had Bar Keepers for pots/pans and used it on the stones. Made a paste, let set on stone a couple minutes, then scrubbed with old toothbrush. Finer stones cleaned more quickly than course.
At Yoshihiro we offer 3 different grades of stones that run the gamut from coarse to fine and are essential tools for proper knife care. A #1000 grit “Arato” stone is best used for repairing damaged and very dull knives. The stone is abrasive which takes off a lot of material for refashioning a dull edge. A #3000 grit “Nakato Shiage” stone is best used for creating a sharp polished edge. This stone is necessary to maintain the blade's edge and is recommended for routine sharpening. An #8000 grit “Shiage” Fine Finishing stone is best used for creating an even more refined and honed edge. 

using an appropriate blade for the task – a thinner blade for more delicate work, and a thicker blade whenever a thinner blade is not required (e.g. a thinner blade might be used to cut fillets, butterfly steak or roast for stuffing, or perform Mukimono, while a thicker one might be used to slice or chop repeatedly, separate primal cuts of poultry or small game, or scrape and trim fat from meat or hide, as these actions would be more likely to cause unnecessary wear on a thinner blade.)
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Best purchase I every made. while my knife doesnt cut a fine layer of tomato without touching it, it became as good as it was when I purchased. I recommend users to learn how to properly sharpen the knife. It took me about 30 minutes to sharpen a single knife to what it is today. The knife gets really sharp. Also, with use, the surface gets uneven. I recommend you draw a grid in pencil and then file using the grinder stone until the grids disappear. This ensures the surface remains flat during all use.
A shinkansen is a Japanese-style pull-through sharpener named after the famous bullet train. It features two sets of ceramic wheels set at the right angle for sharpening a Japanese blade, which takes out the guesswork of the waterstone. Simply hold the handle with your left hand, then saw back and forth gently through the coarser wheel to sharpen, before switching to the finer wheel to polish.
The best knives require special care and consideration. A key component of knife care is knife sharpening. Japanese knives should always be sharpened and honed on premium quality Japanese water stones. A good quality Japanese whetstone not only is the best surface to sharpen and maintain of your knife, but it is also the best tool to preserve and take care of the blade the high quality steel that it is made of. Whetstones can be largely divided into three categories.
Sharpening is really two processes: Grinding and honing. Grinding is simply the removal of metal. Honing is a precision abrasion process in which a relatively small amount of material is removed from the surface by the means of abrasive stones. Once you have the right shape, usually using a more aggressive grit, you then switch to a finer grit to hone the edge.
Sharpening on the other hand is reupholstering the furniture or telling the hair stylist to give you a new look. Material is going to be removed from the edge of the blade. There’s no way around it. How much is removed will be a function of just how dull the knife has become or whether you’re sharpening to compensate for a chip in the edge or because the tip has broken off. If your knife is not damaged and you have it sharpened twice a year very little material will be removed each time, yet it may still be enough for you to notice just by looking carefully with the naked eye.
Be aware that few sharpeners of any type can properly sharpen serrated knives; that’s a job best left to a professional, so we didn’t knock points off our test models if they lacked the capability. Luckily, serrated knives tend to stay sharp for years and years, since it’s the teeth (rather than the edge) that do most of the work. For this review we focused on the sort of knives that sharpeners are designed for: those with standard, straight-edged blades, such as paring and chef’s knives.
We tend to recommend natural Japanese water stones only to experienced users who are thoroughly familiar with the synthetic Japanese sharpening stones. Natural stones are not to everybody’s taste and there are inevitably many uncertainties with regard to their grit grade, which cannot be determined exactly, their hardness and their suitability for certain types of steel.
As the video of our test shows, the Trizor XV took a very dull, very heavy (and slightly bent) 12-inch Wüsthof chef’s knife and made it tomato-slicing sharp. Setting the new edge took about 20 strokes on the coarse wheel; the fine and polishing steps took about 10 and five strokes respectively. All told, the process was perhaps three minutes of work. The motor was impressively powerful, never allowing the sharpening wheels to bog down or “catch” in the metal of the knife. It sharpened blades to within about ⅜ inch of the heel—as with the manual ProntoPro 4643, excellent performance, and a testament to the attention that Chef’sChoice pays to overall design throughout its extensive product range. This sharpening of virtually the entire blade is important. Without it, not only do you lose the ability to cut with the heel of the knife—especially useful when you’re cutting tough root vegetables, where employing the heel provides stability and pressure—but also over time the blade edge develops a “dish,” or dip, that prevents the rear portion of the blade from contacting the cutting board and slicing all the way through a food item.
Once you've sharpened one side, you need to flip over, but don't swap the hand gripping the blade – think of it a bit like going backhand with a tennis racket (see above). Lead with the heel this time, rather then with the blade, but repeat the process in three parts. After five strokes on each third of the blade, it's time to check your knife. It's not an exact science, and it all depends on how blunt your blade was to start with (mine was very blunt indeed). But if you sharpen fairly regularly, it should just take a few strokes. 
I've been using this stone for months and have started to find that, while the fine side does provide a nice sharp edge, the 400gr side is wearing my knives unevenly, which causes me to be unable to finely sharpen the entire length of the blade when moving to the fine side. The logo that is put in the middle of the 400gr side of the knife is causing more material to be removed than the rest of the blade when I'm sweeping across. I even verified this by going straight down the length of the fine side and watching the wear pattern come from the material coming off of the knife onto the stone.

★ SHARPEN ANY EDGE – THE PERFECT GIFT – Our professional grade knife sharpener doesn’t only work its magic on Kitchen and Chef Knives, its versatility extends to virtually any blade! Sharpen Fillet Knives, Sushi Knives, Pruners, Straight Razor Blades, Scissors, Chisels, Pocket Knives, Axes, and Hunting Knives! With so many of these things used in our daily lives, it makes a thoughtful gift for any family member or friend.


I've always wanted to sharpen knives on water stones, and this set gave me the motivation to finally give it a shot. The price is amazing for the quality and content of the set. It comes with all the grits you need to sharpen anything... I usually start on the 400 grit if the knife is very dull, or directly on the 1000 grit if it's not too dull. The 3000 and 8000 grit stones are softer and ideal after the coarser stones. The online learning section is truly amazing, much better than I expected. A convenient place with instructional videos and many articles about knife sharpening. Only downside is that the knives are now so sharp I need to be very careful using them... but that's a good thing! I feel like I fell in love with knife sharpening again.
If you want to start hand-sharpening knives, and you’ve never used stones, this kit has everything you need. It includes a medium-grit stone for sharpening and an Arkansas stone for finishing. It also includes a honing solution that protects and cleans the stone’s surface as well as a small plastic guide to help sharpening novices learn the correct angle for sharpening. This is the classic method for sharpening knives, which takes some time to master, but once you learn how to use a stone, you can sharpen knives to any angle you prefer.
The truth is that there is no one recommendation that we can make that will meet everyone’s needs. Every sharpener’s needs are different and every sharpening toolkit will be different. In order to help beginning sharpeners get started with good sharpening stones to build around, we need to understand their individual needs. So with that in mind, let’s look at the basic needs of a beginning sharpener.
As you continue to repeat strokes on the first time, eventually a tiny burr will form on the other side of the blade. To check for it, place the blade on your thumb, and pull it backwards. If the burr has formed, it should catch slightly on your thumb (with really fine grit stones, say 2000 or above, you won't feel this). This may take up to 30 or 40 strokes, and is the indication that you should switch and start sharpening the other side.
I really liked this whetstone! I had a Smith's pocket sharpener that could get my knife sharp enough for working around in the yard (I have an Opinel no.8). However, in doing a little research I found that the sharpener was only around 600 grit on the finest setting. So this BearMoo 1000/4000 grit looked like the perfect step up, and it turned out to be the perfect stone for me. The pictures are an accurate representation of what you get. The removable rubber base was helpful when switching from one side to the next, and it kept the stone from sliding around. The instructions say that the stone can work with either water or oil, but that water is preferred. It said to leave the stone soaking in water for five minutes, and the stone worked like a champ. I especially liked how the instructions gave you an approximate time of how long the stone takes to sharpen a knife -- it just helped give me an idea that it would take about 15-20 minutes on the 1000 grit side, and then another 10-15 minutes on the 4000 grit. Just turn on a TV show!
Stones are divided into hard oilstones (often called Arkansas stones), which use mineral oil or kerosene as a lubricant, and soft (often called Japanese) waterstones, which use water as a lubricant. Whereas the hard oilstones rely on directly abrading the knife steel, the soft waterstones wear away rapidly as you sharpen, producing an abrasive slurry that cuts the new edge; they work more quickly, but you have to regularly reflatten them by rubbing them against a sheet of glass. With both kinds, you have to set and maintain the sharpening angle using only your eyes and hands, and any sloppiness can quickly produce a rounded edge that will hardly cut butter. Doing it right is not all that hard once you get the knack, but there’s a difficult initial learning curve. You also need at least two stones, coarse and fine, to do a proper job—and good stones aren’t cheap. And both oilstones and waterstones make a bit of a mess in use and take a lot more time to set a new edge than the sharpening tools we recommend here—10 to 20 minutes versus three minutes or less. 

A: Most chefs have their own personal favorite and that’s what it comes down to for just about everybody; personal choice. If you’re the kind who likes to get personally involved in the process you might want to opt for a stone or stick knife sharpener.  These will allow you a certain amount of satisfaction knowing it was your expertise that produced the razor sharp edge. Others, however, are quite content to let the machine do the work and that’s fine too.

Most people don't think about sharpening knives until this vital kitchen tool is no longer sharp. The truth is that nothing impacts the longevity of your knives, or their daily performance, more than regular sharpening and maintenance. A dull knife in the kitchen is more dangerous than a sharp one when employees must force their way through cutting meat and slicing vegetables. As a result, daily sharpening and maintenance is easy, and most importantly, necessary. We're here to show you how to use a sharpening stone, including correct techniques and maintenance. The end result is a more efficient, and safer, set of knives!
This set of two Norton combination waterstones provides four grits and also includes a flattening stone as an added value. The 220, 1000, 4000 and 8000 grit sides will handle everything from aggressive shaping to final polishing. They are 8" long by 3" wide, big enough to handle most knives and tools easily. Our most popular waterstone kit, this has everything you need to both sharpen with waterstones and maintain the stones themselves. A great starter set.

Now that you're holding the handle and the blade is in position, gently apply some pressure to the belly of the blade with your left hand fingers – "roughly the amount of pressure to semi depress a sponge," says Warner. Starting at the tip, glide the blade up and down the stone – around five strokes up and down is a good number. Then move to the middle – five more strokes. Finally five strokes up and down on the heel.
Siliciclastic stone is a clastic, noncarbonate, sedimentary stone that is almost exclusively silica-bearing and exists as either a form of quartz or, another silicate mineral. In addition, hardened clay is also a sedimentary stone but, it is formed from organic materials such as plant and animal matter and thus, it is much softer than Siliciclastic However, when silicon sediment is suspended in a clay matrix and then naturally hardened over thousands of years, it forms an excellent whetstone material; although, it is somewhat softer than Novaculite. Thus, because the geology of Japan once held large deposits of this type of stone it has been used for hundreds of years for sharpening tools, knives, and swords. However, unlike Novaculite, Belgian Blue, and Coticule, both natural and synthetic Japanese whetstones use water for lubrication and thus, they are commonly known as “Japanese Water Stones” because this type of stone is very porous. Thus, natural Japanese Water Stones must be soaked in water for up to twenty-four hours prior to use whereas, synthetic Japanese Water Stones can be soaked for only a few moments.
The unique three stone system features a 6" medium Arkansas, 6" fine Arkansas and 6" coarse synthetic stone mounted on a molded plastic triangle with handles on the end for easy stone selection. The sturdy molded plastic base has non-skid rubber feet for safety, a V-shaped trough to catch oil drippings and easy-to- read stone identification markings.
All Yoshihiro knives are handcrafted by Artisans with a lineage spanning centuries. The origins of the techniques used to create Yoshihiro knives dates back to medieval Japanese sword smiths who perfected the technique of handling fire, iron, and water. Our selections are far and wide and is a culmination of seven centuries of tradition intertwining with modern innovation inspired from Japanese ingenuity.
Functionality – If you have experience with the stick or sharpening stone you likely don’t want or need anything else. If, however, you are in search of an electric-powered sharpener you’ll want to consider how many “stages” you need in your sharpener. In a typical 3-stage sharpener the first stage is the coarsest and does most of the heavy lifting required to turn the edge from dull to sharp. The second stage will have finer grain sharpening wheels. These are used to hone the edge, that is, to smooth out the burrs left by the coarse first stage. A third stage will refine the edge even further and remove any debris left over from the sharpening process.
✅ PREMIUM QUALITY : Our products have been inspected by a reputable third party inspection company. Each product has been checked,put under a durability and functionality test before shipped to you. NO COMPROMISE on quality! This simple-yet-unparalled award winning tool is used by everyone from stay at home moms to various professionals. Don’t forget to buy this as a PERFECT GIFT for your family & friends.
A: We’re all told that a sharp knife is safer than a dull knife yet most everyone knows that merely touching a sharp knife can often result in a painful cut while we can wrap our hand around a dull blade with little worry. So why would anyone in their right mind claim that a sharp one is safer than a dull one? To a certain extent it’s a matter of semantics for sure, because there is no denying you have to be extremely careful around really sharp knives. But at the same time there is a very good reason to consider a dull knife to be more of a safety hazard than a sharp knife.
Sharp knives make the culinary world go round but finding the best knife sharpener isn’t as simple as walking into the store (do people still walk into stores?) and grabbing the first sharpener that presents itself. There are different types of electric sharpeners, some that are straightforward and some whose sharpening process involves as many as 3 or 4 stages. If you’re looking to keep things simple by using a sharpening stone well, there are 3 different types of them as well – oil, water and diamond – and they each have their pros and cons. So it can be confusing.
Now that you're holding the handle and the blade is in position, gently apply some pressure to the belly of the blade with your left hand fingers – "roughly the amount of pressure to semi depress a sponge," says Warner. Starting at the tip, glide the blade up and down the stone – around five strokes up and down is a good number. Then move to the middle – five more strokes. Finally five strokes up and down on the heel.
A honing rod (also known as a honing steel, knife steel, or sharpening steel) is also highly recommended. These are not sharpeners, although they are often thought of that way. Rather, a honing rod helps keep a blade’s edge keen between sharpenings by straightening out the tiny dings and dents caused by everyday slicing and chopping. Honing is a simple and fast process—it takes just a few seconds—and it can extend the life of a sharp edge for weeks or even months. Eventually, however, the edge gets rounded over and dull; then it’s time for a complete resharpening.
Electric sharpeners use rotating ceramic or abrasive-impregnated metal wheels to grind a new edge into a blade. Low-end models, which start at about $25, feature a single set of coarse wheels that produce a rough, if potentially serviceable, edge—it depends on how even the edge is, and that’s a matter of overall design and engineering. Higher-end models can cost $200 or more (and professional models for slaughterhouses can approach $1,000), but they feature stronger motors and multiple grinding wheels—coarse, fine, and often polishing/honing—that when well-engineered can put an extremely keen, durable edge on knives of every style and quality.
The stone – With a sharpening stone, the process is essentially the same as with the stick sharpener. The only difference is that you don’t hold the stone, you place it into its own holder (If it comes with one. If it doesn’t you’ll need to improvise) on a flat surface. Push the knife down the stone several times while holding it at a shallow angle and then flip it and pull it toward you several times to get the other side of the blade.

Aesthetics – While it’s true that most people keep their sharpener, (even their expensive mechanical sharpeners) in the drawer until it’s time to use them you’ll still want to be aware of whether your sharpener fits into the overall aesthetic of your kitchen when you do take it out to use. While sharpener designs are fairly limited to be sure you typically have some control over the color and finish of the device as well as design factors like whether the device is boxy or rounded in appearance. With a stone sharpener or a stick however you pretty much get what you get.
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